Page 4 of 5 (132 items)

 

Calling all e-learning folks who work in higher education

Donna Carter

129 posts

Posted Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at 8:07 AM  

I was reviewing Dave Anderson’s Word of Mouth Blog yesterday, and noticed Nita Venter’s post on E-learning in Healthcare.  It occurred to me (as it has many times in the past), that it would be great if there were similar discussions for folks who work in higher education.

 

While I have always benefitted from the general discussions in the forums, there are some issues that I’d love to discuss with others in academia, such as how other institutions are addressing universal design with the Articulate suite of tools and how to address issues regarding instructors who are great SMEs, but not so great when it comes to course design.

 

I’m hoping that there are others out there in higher education that are interested, and look forward to some great discussions.  Let me know what you think and maybe suggest some topics to get us started!


All Replies

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 7:27 AM  

Marti - I thought this presentation was great. I like the idea of giving tips to encourage students to think for themselves about what they need to include, rather than spoonfeeding them. All the information about quality is right there, they just need to piece it together. I teach at one of Ireland's leading universities, and I have to say that a presentation like this would benefit my students too. You've given me inspiration for next semester - thank you!


Sami Hwang

107 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 9:06 AM  

Thank you for your good plan, Donna!

That is why you are the leader of this group. ^^

Another potential topic can be what kinds of technical or policy-wise obstacles we will encounter and how to overcome it to adopt industry standard e-learning tools in higher education environment. We can talk about based upon our own experience and share ideas.

This is the issue that Karen,  Tara, and Rebekah are bringing up.


Nickola Frye

7 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 9:22 AM  

One of the topics that I would love to have input from others is - "How are you assisting user who are still on dial-up or slow Internet connections?"  What tricks do you have for compressing modules, videos, etc. for rapid utilization by these students?

 

An additional topic could be - working with reluctant instructors.  Some of the materials that I am using come from instructors that have been giving a course for decades.  They know what they do, but they have difficulty understanding this new paradigm of instruction.  I frequently have to deal with the concept of - "Just take my PowerPoint and other materials and make it into an online course." "Don't you just provide the information to them like on a website?"  I am sure that this is a topic that many of us are trying to work around.


Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 9:38 AM  

 

Nickola Frye said:

One of the topics that I would love to have input from others is - "How are you assisting user who are still on dial-up or slow Internet connections?"  What tricks do you have for compressing modules, videos, etc. for rapid utilization by these students?

An additional topic could be - working with reluctant instructors.  Some of the materials that I am using come from instructors that have been giving a course for decades.  They know what they do, but they have difficulty understanding this new paradigm of instruction.  I frequently have to deal with the concept of - "Just take my PowerPoint and other materials and make it into an online course." "Don't you just provide the information to them like on a website?"  I am sure that this is a topic that many of us are trying to work around.



Since we are an online only college, we train our faculty to work and teach in an online environment. New faculty don't always have this experience. But since our faculty does not BUILD the courses we don't have the one issues you describe.

 

But the world is changing quickly and if they don't move forward in their thinking, they will be left behind and looking for work. More and more education is moving online and even to mobile devices. If you can't keep up then your career will be minimized. It's not choice, it's a fact.

 


Art Sederquist

11 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 9:56 AM  

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 



Donna Carter

129 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 5:12 PM  

Robin Weber said:

I am excited that you are starting a higher education discussion! I am a technology coordinator in one college and an adjunct instructor at another. I am having trouble getting faculty in the one college to break away from boring online learning and cannot get approval to use Articulate or any other diversified technology inside of Blackboard in the other. It has been very frustrating for me as I have seen and practiced creating all the cool ideas that I find on eLearning Heroes. The folks that I work with seem stuck on boring PPTs, uninteresting videos and formats that have remained static for several years. I would love to be able to use what I have learned to make our offerings more interactive and exciting, but whatever I create never gets used. I cannot advance in my ID skills by using all the great programs that are out there because my colleges won't buy into the technology. From what I have read here, it seems that other colleges are using rapid authoring tools. Is anyone else have the same problems that I am ? Any advice that is out there would be most appreciated! 

 

On another note, I have done some reading about the Quality Matters program. I know that the University of Northern Colorado uses this program and they seem to be doing a fantastic job in their instructional design and curriculum design. 



Robin

 

You mentioned your inability to advance in your ID skills  because you don't get to use your skills on the job.  An excellent way to use all of the great ideas you have, and do some good for others, is to volunteer.  I have volunteered for the last several years in the Global Giveback, and you might want to check it out. jderies@e-learningforkids.org also uses volunteers for their development.  Good luck, and I hope this helps.


Donna Carter

129 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 5:29 PM  

Art Sederquist said:

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 




This is a great resource Mike.  Thanks for sharing.


Rebekah Brown

18 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 5:35 PM  

Art Sederquist said:

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 




Thanks so much for sharing that book - much appreciated. I'm looking forward to reading and learning.

 


Michelle Leon

15 posts

Posted Friday, March 30, 2012 at 5:36 PM  

Robin Weber said:

I am excited that you are starting a higher education discussion! I am a technology coordinator in one college and an adjunct instructor at another. I am having trouble getting faculty in the one college to break away from boring online learning and cannot get approval to use Articulate or any other diversified technology inside of Blackboard in the other. It has been very frustrating for me as I have seen and practiced creating all the cool ideas that I find on eLearning Heroes. The folks that I work with seem stuck on boring PPTs, uninteresting videos and formats that have remained static for several years. I would love to be able to use what I have learned to make our offerings more interactive and exciting, but whatever I create never gets used. I cannot advance in my ID skills by using all the great programs that are out there because my colleges won't buy into the technology. From what I have read here, it seems that other colleges are using rapid authoring tools. Is anyone else have the same problems that I am ? Any advice that is out there would be most appreciated! 

 

On another note, I have done some reading about the Quality Matters program. I know that the University of Northern Colorado uses this program and they seem to be doing a fantastic job in their instructional design and curriculum design. 



Hi Robin, there are two things that I suggest:

 

1. Use Articulate's free trial and create something cool to sell use of the program to your desired audience.

 

2. There are some cool things you can do with PowerPoint using hyperlinks. I have been able to create some cool scenarios without even using Articulate. You can create what looks like buttons and hyperlink them to the corresponding slide.

 

A very brief example:

Slide 1: Suppose you are a teacher and a student cheats. How do you address it?

Option A: Scold them in front of the class. (Clicking on this choice takes them to a slide that gives feedback if they chose this)

Option B: Address them privately (Clicking on this choice takes them to a slide that gives feedback if they chose this)

Option C: Don't do anything. (Clicking on this choice takes them to a slide that gives feedback if they chose this)

 

I think the issue isn't just using PowerPoint, the issue is usually PRESENTATION of information, getting students to think instead of just spoon-feeding them via "boring" informational slides.


Posted Saturday, March 31, 2012 at 2:28 AM  

Hi Folks,

          Just check the content of the  book,

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

It seem great. I will do a little summary of the book when I finished reading it.


Posted Saturday, March 31, 2012 at 8:37 AM  

How can you go about convincing faculty, provosts, etc that elearning is the furture?  Any suggestions?


Posted Monday, April 02, 2012 at 8:19 AM  

 

Katrina Garbiel said:

How can you go about convincing faculty, provosts, etc that elearning is the furture?  Any suggestions?



You could use the the CSU-GLOBAL campus as an example (where I work). We have been in existence for roughly 4 years, starting from scratch, and have risen from obscurity to a fully accredited higher ed. institution in that time. We ONLY offer online learning and are growing exponentially every year. If that doesn't help convince your people then I don't know what will. Well, maybe I don't want you to. Less competition that way

 

www.csuglobal.edu 

 


Posted Tuesday, April 03, 2012 at 1:13 AM  

Katrina Garbiel said:

How can you go about convincing faculty, provosts, etc that elearning is the furture?  Any suggestions?

 

Yes, you can the number of people getting internet enable devices everyday and the cost advantage of getting smartphones as well as the number of time people on the internet or computer is increasing at alarming rate. Meaning that for learning to be meaning to 21st audiences, it has to be done not just traditional classroom teaching but on-line which is the school home of 21st learners.

 

Use can also use disruptive innovation theory. Check this article by Intel Nigeria "What does the African Continent really need to take our technology and innovation to the next level?http://memeburn.com/2012/04/what-kind-of-disruption-does-africas-tech-scene-really-need/ 

We can therefore say that What does the Education  really need to take our technology and innovation to the next level?


Claudia H

3 posts

Posted Wednesday, April 04, 2012 at 7:30 PM  

Nickola Frye said:

One of the topics that I would love to have input from others is - "How are you assisting user who are still on dial-up or slow Internet connections?"  What tricks do you have for compressing modules, videos, etc. for rapid utilization by these students? An additional topic could be - working with reluctant instructors.

Wow Nickola,

I do not know if I am alone, but you touched two issues that some schools around here (MI) struggle with. There are students who are still living by the Thumb where they cannot have anything but dial-up. It has been suggested the need of "air cards" for students; however, this depends on budget. Some students have smartphones and invest in their data plan, but our courses are not yet "mobile" friendly. To minimize stress on our students we suggest faculty to also make available transcripts of the videos (but not all instructors can comply with this), minimize the length of the recording (some instructors go on with a full 1 hour lecture).

Working with reluctant instructors is a challenge, and it is a topic I would love to hear about from others. I used to work as a computer programmer and I know that building trust with my users helped me to create the program or system they needed. I am new to ID, but little by little I am learning this field. I try to apply what I am learning when preparing training for our instructors, and from time to time I share little bits of course design "good to have" with fellow instructors who welcome the observations. I sit down with them and "learn" their needs. Each and all of them are awesome SMEs, but gaining their trust is a long process. Some of them do not buy in technology, and somehow I understand why; however, if technology is their weakness I offer my service to create a template course for them. They can choose what they need, move, or request necessary changes.

I do feel that online learning might not be a fit for some learners, and the same can be for instructors. Not all instructors are a fit to deliver a course online.

 




Posted Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at 12:52 AM  

Hello everyone.

 

I am a newly employed (2 weeks) e-learning ninja at the University of Oslo, Faculty of Medicine. There are alot of things going on here and e-learning fits like a glove for many of the projects. Good topic this. I am going to subscribe to follow it.

 

Keep up the good work   


Donna Carter

129 posts

Laura Casey

8 posts

Posted Wednesday, June 13, 2012 at 4:38 PM  

Donna Carter said:

 

Art Sederquist said:

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 




This is a great resource Mike.  Thanks for sharing.

 



This looks like a great erso

Art Sederquist said:

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 




Thank you for this - this looks fabulous!


Rebekah Brown

18 posts

Posted Monday, June 25, 2012 at 12:56 PM  

I'd love to go but distance and $$ are against me. If anyone does go any reports will be much appreciated.


Doug Mattson

59 posts

Posted Wednesday, September 26, 2012 at 11:46 AM  

I am new to the academic world. I have spent the last 19 years working in healthcare as an elearning developer, etc. I worked with Nita on the healthcare forum for a short while.

I have only been working in my current IDS job for about 6 weeks and am quickly becoming acclimated to Blackboard. I am noticing that many use Blackboard and all of its tools as the one-stop-shop/end-all. I have done a lot of higher-end work in Articulate and I don't want to lose those skills. That would be tragic. I remain hopeful that I can start developing interactive pieces with Articulate and Storyline to augment the other media used in the blend.

I don't want to just organize course content...I want to design an experience that leaves the learner wanting more.


Claudia H

3 posts

Posted Wednesday, September 26, 2012 at 12:00 PM  

Doug Mattson said:

"I don't want to just organize course content...I want to design an experience that leaves the learner wanting more."


Hi Doug!

Depending on the culture in your organization you may or may not design experiences that leave learners to want more.

1. You need faculty to buy-in on collaborating to develop those experiences. Instructors review textbook publisher's course content and it tends to be easier for them to use the content provided with the textbook. This may not be the case in all educational institutions, but it can be a common denominator.

2. Propose little bits of in-house content development, run a blog or email "spot-line" notes with demos of elearning content created. Is there an elearning committee in your institution? This is the place where you can "show and spread" the word of other elearning alternatives of content that can be imported to the LMS.

I am currently the LMS administrator, but I also collaborate with instructors developing "pieces" of interactive content. It is not easy as it not like if you had to develop a whole elearning course, but somehow, helps to add content that goes beyond the "page flipping"


Lisa AV

1 posts

Posted Wednesday, September 26, 2012 at 12:32 PM  

Do any of you Higher Education folks design/deliver e-learning for Staff? I'm not involved in the student space, but would love to connect with other folks who are targeting staff. It's a very diverse group and often challenging in design.


Doug Mattson

59 posts

Posted Monday, October 08, 2012 at 9:15 AM  

Hi Lisa,

I used to design/deliver e-learning for staff in my previous job. What is the subject matter you are needing to deliver and what are the results you are needing to achieve with the effort?

 

Doug


Robin Weber

6 posts

Posted Monday, October 08, 2012 at 10:32 AM  

I do training/workshops for staff and faculty at UNC currently. You are right it can be challenging, but I have had fairly good success so far. I use electronic evaluations after each workshop to find out if I am meeting their needs or not. These have been very helpful. I start off with the basics of whatever software/technology I am teaching and then add features/uses based on the feedback that I get. 


Posted Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 2:43 PM  

Lisa AV said:

Do any of you Higher Education folks design/deliver e-learning for Staff? I'm not involved in the student space, but would love to connect with other folks who are targeting staff. It's a very diverse group and often challenging in design.


Hey Lisa

 

I deliver e-Learning content to Staff/Faculty/Administrators. Its very challenging. My grammar and spelling is judged on a regular basis. lol. I'm having a challenging time now, because our college has baby boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials. So, the technology levels vary.


christine kent

23 posts

Posted Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 8:30 PM  

 

Rebekah Brown said:

 

Art Sederquist said:

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 



 


Thanks so much for sharing that book - much appreciated. I'm looking forward to reading and learning.

 



This is a great list.  I would like to see a group of us work out Articulate processes that work to deliver each of these options.

 


Art Sederquist

11 posts

Posted Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 8:38 PM  

 

christine kent said:

 

Rebekah Brown said:

 

Art Sederquist said:

Here's a great book published under Creative Commons that I think the group will appreciate.  The book offers a series of case studies dealing "with the design of distance eduation at an emerging dual-mode university ... offering both on-campus and online courses."


The book was written from the point of view of an instructional designer working alongside ten univeristy faculty members dealing with preparing them and their instruction for use online.

 

A Designer’s Log

Case Studies in Instructional Design

Michael Power, 2007

 

http://www.aupress.ca/books/120161/ebook/99Z_Power_2009-Designers_Log.pdf

Also, be sure to explore the appendices; Appendix C, in particular, provides examples of teaching activities used in distance education and online learning. 



 


Thanks so much for sharing that book - much appreciated. I'm looking forward to reading and learning.

 



This is a great list.  I would like to see a group of us work out Articulate processes that work to deliver each of these options.

 

Interesting idea Christine.  Could you elaborate? 

 



 


christine kent

23 posts

Posted Tuesday, October 16, 2012 at 10:58 PM  

It is easy to make Articulate do easy things, but I am not yet convinced of its usefulness to achieve higher ed or vocational ed learning outcomes.  

 

Articulate has put out some gorgeous samples of making Articulate do fancy things, but it would make my life easier if I could put together a library of Articulate "coding" to achieve the various types of learning activity suggested in appendix 3 of the recommended text above or something similar - I am talking a tagging taxonomy here.

 

I am looking at how to develop vocational ed courses for on-line delivery.  In Australia these courses are centrally designed and come with not only specified performance criteria but also specified skills.  It can be difficult to keep both cross sections of a total course in mind while designing and developing the course.  Performance criteria are relatively easy to teach to and to demonstrate that the competency has been achieved. However, qualitative skills outcomes are much more difficult to demonstrate.  This is an example of the skills outcomes for a level 4 course I am looking at.

 

  • communication skills to provide effective support and motivation to a team and overcome communication barriers
  • literacy skills to:
  • ◦ read and interpret a wide range of operational workplace information
  • ◦ write clear and articulate team plans
  • planning and organising skills to ensure activities and initiatives important to team development are integrated into own work planning
  • problem-solving skills to identify skill deficiencies and provide opportunities for individual development
  • self-management skills to take responsibility for team outcomes
  • teamwork skills to represent team interests in the wider organisation environment.

One simple way to manage both cross sections (performance criteria and skills) is to cover content according to performance criteria and then include activities that are pitched to the appropriate skill level.

 

To manage course development on a large scale we need to be able to library anything slick we develop, for future re-use, so we would tag "objects" in groups that demonstrate performance criteria but also as single activities tagged according to the skill demonstrated by the activity.  That list of activities above is a good start towards achieving a taxonomy for tagging and re-usability, although the one we work with in the Australian VET sector is more complex.

 

From an IDs point of view it would be so nice to be able to say, oh, I should do a "something or other" activity, and then just pick up a slick really well designed set of slides already sitting in the library that have done just that for another course, and re-use them.  

 

So has anyone tagged all those examples of really slick "coding" put out by Articulate according to a stated taxonomy so that we can search for and find relevant examples.  At the moment I find myself cruising through examples and seeing how I can show off by using them, rather than finding what I need to solve a given problem - it's fun but it is not going to "sell" Articulate as a serious course development tool.

 


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