One of the nice features that Microsoft added in PowerPoint 2010 is a handy built-in screen capture tool. If you need to include screenshots in your rapid e-learning courses, this tool can save you quite a few clicks. It eliminates the time you'd otherwise spend firing up a separate screen-capture app, grabbing your screenshot, saving the file, and then inserting that file onto your slide. And what's cool is, once you drop your screenshot onto a slide, it behaves like any other image that you insert in PowerPoint. You can crop it, apply affects to it, and even save it as a separate image file if you like. Check out the tutorial below to learn more:

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13 Comments
Mark Dawdy
Steve Flowers
Jeanette Brooks
Jeanette Brooks
Mark Dawdy

There are other screen capture tools that make it easier to make screen captures - SnagIt, as mentioned above, is probably the best featured program. But close runners up are - Ashampoo's Snap 8, I really like it's after capture effects (stamps, numbering, etc) and Movavi's Screen Capture or Studio. What do these programs give as an advantage over "print screen" or PPT? They have their own editors and allow you to easily share with other programs and applications (email, etc). You can save the capture in many different formats and add many kinds of stamps, text, captions, graphical elements, etc. Plus, you can set up staged captures to create steps in a process or how-to's or QRG's (quick reference guides). You can whip out a step-by-step guide in a matter of minutes. You can al... Expand