Using Interactive Sliders in E-Learning #52

Interactive Sliders in E-Learning #52: Challenge | Recap

One of the most exciting features in Storyline is the interactive sliders. In short, sliders are really easy to create and customize.

You can use interactive sliders to:

  • manipulate data
  • explore cause-and-effect relationships
  • control other objects

Learners won’t be able to resist slider interactions.

Examples of Slider Interactions in Storyline 2

Michael was creating sliders in Storyline before there were sliders in Storyline. If you’re looking for advanced slider interactions, you should check out Michael’s blog and tutorials.

View example | Read more about this project | Michael Hinze

Sliding Along with Storyline 2

Customize your sliders to look any way you want. Allison shares some creative ways to use sliders for navigation, calculations, and character state changes. Be sure to check out her blog post to learn more about sliders and download the Storyline source file.

View examples | Read more about this project | Allison Nederveld

Photo Sliders

I like how Richard customized the slider with a camera icon to create this photo slider. You can learn more about this creative project and download the Storyline source file from Richard’s site.

View example | Read more about this project | Richard Watson

Video Slider Carousel

Creative example from Brian Allen on using sliders to browse video clips. You can download the Storyline file in this forum conversation.

View example | Download source | Brian Allen

Sliders with Story Lion

The Story Lion returns to demonstrate “slider-tastic” ways to use sliders for creative storytelling.

View the slider example

Moodometer

Another example of using sliders to change object and character states.  This type of slider is ideal for interactive surveys that evaluate how learners feel about a particular question or topic.

View example | Robbie Chui

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to show creative ways to use sliders in online learning. You can focus your slider on functionality or visual design.

Optional: Because sliders are new to all of us, please consider sharing your source files so we can learn from one another.

Here are some possible slider topics to get your creative juices sliding:

  • Navigation - How can sliders be used for navigating a slide or series of topics?

  • Data manipulation - How can you use sliders to control numeric variables for interactive scorecards, financial interactions, or mathematics learning?

  • Cause-and-effect relationships - How can you use sliders to show relationships between two or more objects or concepts?

  • Custom sliders - How can sliders be aligned visually with your course design?

Slider examples and source files

Slider tutorials

Tools

This is our first challenge based on a software feature. If you don’t already have Storyline 2, you’re welcome to use a trial version.

Do you have an idea for a slider interaction but aren’t able to use Storyline 2? You’re welcome to use PowerPoint or any other tool to share your slider examples. We really just want to see how you’re using sliders in e-learning.

Last week’s challenge

Check out the font-tastic typography games your fellow community members shared over the past week:

E-Learning Challenge #52: Challenge | Recap

Wishing you a slideriffic week, E-Learning Heroes!

More about the e-learning challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.

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Andrew Sellon
David Anderson
David Anderson
Paul Alders
Paul Alders
Allison Nederveld
Paul Alders
Robbie the eLearning Man
Richard Watson
Richard Watson