100-row, 2-column table: A better way?

Hi Heroes! I have a pretty complex interactivity I'm building and just wondering (maybe even suspecting..) whether there isnt't a better/more elegant way to accomplish it than what I've managed (as a non-programmer). I thought I would check and see if someone might have a few spare minutes to take a quick look and let me know if anything comes to mind. You can probably see pretty quickly in first three rows of attached .story file (also a Review link below) what I'm trying to do, but the requirements are: There is a table with about 100 rows and two columns labeled "OK" and "Fix"in a scroll panel in a base layer (this is an exercise for landlords-to-be doing property checks on new move-outs FYI). For each row, users can select either column or leave both blank. The feedback layer has same table except that the 1st column (labeled "You") will display whatever the learner entered for that row in the base layer (i.e., OK, Fix, or NA if left blank) and the 2nd column will be static/the answer key (not yet included). Attached reflects the way I figured out to do it, i.e. with 8 triggers (5 on base, 3 on feedback layer) and a number variable for each row which translates to about 100 variables and 800 triggers. I wanted to check and see if any of you had perhaps done something similar at some point and might quickly recognize a better way to accomplish the same functionality. This is by no means urgent as I've already figured out a solution that works, but didn't think it would hurt to ask. Many thanks in advance -- and just as a general shout-out, so grateful for the Articulate User Community! Here is a review link:  https://360.articulate.com/review/content/18f0c17b-89c0-4bc4-a62e-3633a36ddb23/review

2 Replies
Bob O'Donnell

Interesting. That is a lot of data! The only alternate option I can think of is to give the users a PDF form to print and fill out. Once ready, you could progress to a feedback screen and provide a pre-filled PDF with the Correct Items that user could compare their notes to. Leaves room for explanations why an item should be fixed as well.

If there's a more elegant way I would like to see it as well. We have requests like this come up with our client's all the time.

Bill King

Hi Bob, thanks for the reply. A lot of data indeed! I ended up building out the full data entry table - all 97 rows/500 triggers.. - using the settings/approach in the sample I included above. The biggest challenge once I got started was my machine (2017 / ASUS N550JV / Intel Core i7-4700HQ 35) handling all the triggers. It slowed to a crawl after about the first 300. One quick thing I think I learned about building pages with 100's of triggers:  using a blank master slide instead of a templated/branded one seemed to speed things up noticeably/more than I would have thought. Feel free to let me know if you think I can help - happy to share - with any similar needs you may run into.