Google Chrome to block Flash toward end of 2016

According to this story, Google Chrome is going to start disabling Flash content by default by the end of the year:

http://www.theverge.com/2016/5/15/11679394/chrome-to-block-flash-later-2016

"Under its current vision, nearly every website would have Flash content blocked by default. Visitors would still be able to enable Flash content on a site-by-site basis, but they would have to specifically choose to do so. Chrome would display a prompt offering to enable Flash; if chosen, Chrome would remember to run Flash on that site for all future visits."

I think this is a very significant factor in the choice of whether or not to include HTML 5 output when publishing. (in other words, I'd say always check that box)

5 Replies
Brian Allen
Will Findlay

I think this is a very significant factor in the choice of whether or not to include HTML 5 output when publishing. (in other words, I'd say always check that box)

We've been using this as a best practice for everything we publish for ~2-3 years now, for exactly this reason. Plus we feel like we'll continue to see more and more users on mobile devices.

What I don't know about the current set up is how exactly does Articulate decide which to server, Flash or HTML5?

It doesn't seem like it is enough just to detect if the user is on a desktop/laptop or mobile device, since a user could be on a desktop or laptop but using a browser that has Flash disabled.

Ashley Terwilliger

Hi Brian and Will,

The specifics of how Storyline or Studio determine which to show is embedded in the story.html file - but if the user accesses it on a device or browser that does not run or have Flash, they'll see the HTML5 output. I know the topic of a full shift to HTML5 has been going on for some time in the forums, and I know it's something our team continues to investigate and keep an eye on - but I don't have any other information to share at this time. We do have the white paper here in terms of mobile deployment which tends to err towards HTML5 - so you may want to review that as well. 

Brian Allen
Ashley Terwilliger

but if the user accesses it on a device or browser that does not run or have Flash, they'll see the HTML5 output

Thanks Ashley for the quick response.

I'm not an expert on this by a long shot, but from what you're saying it sounds like our Chrome users will see the HTML5 version in Chrome, even if they have Flash installed on their computer, if this article is correct: "To further encourage that change, Chrome won't simply be blocking Flash — it'll be pretending like Flash isn't even installed. So if a website has a backup HTML5 player, people using Chrome will see that, rather than a prompt to enable Flash."

Ashley Terwilliger

Hi Brian, 

I'm certainly not an expert on this either! But, yes, that sounds right - as Chrome has a flash plug in currently, so it's not relying on the Flash installed on the individual system nor do I believe it'll look for that.  I believe the same occurs if you were to disable the Flash plug in within Chrome right now that you'd see the HTML5 content if you've published with it included.