11 Replies
Jennifer Boettcher

Laura, I'm glad I found this post, since I have the exact same question.  After reading the responses, I'm still not sure I understand the value of using a lightbox versus a layer.  You can have the slide layer dim the base layer as well, so isn't it in effect the same thing? 

I watched this tutorial today, and kept thinking - why not just put each video as a layer? 

Phil Mayor

Jennifer Boettcher said:

Laura, I'm glad I found this post, since I have the exact same question.  After reading the responses, I'm still not sure I understand the value of using a lightbox versus a layer.  You can have the slide layer dim the base layer as well, so isn't it in effect the same thing? 

I watched this tutorial today, and kept thinking - why not just put each video as a layer? 


The dim is only for production it doesn't show when published .  You could of course add a translucent shape to get the same. Effect.  They are two ways of achieving the same effect.

one way I like to use light box slides is as a recap, if you mention something later on you could add a link/button to reshot the slide if the user wanted without them having to search for it. 

eLearning Development

Jennifer;

The best thing about a lightbox slide I have found is that on close it goes back to the slide you were on.  If you have some information that could be pulled up from many places in your file, a lightbox allows you to link to that same slide over and over again but each time it will close back to where you were vs repeating that layer on all of the slides that could draw that info.

Tim

Jennifer Boettcher

Thanks Phil and Tim for your replies. I can definitely see the value in a lightbox if you want to link to an existing slide, or if you want the content available from multiple pages. However, if the interaction is on a single page, I think layers can work just as well.

I was curious, so I created a sample file with two versions of a video media gallery, to mimic the tutorial referenced above. I created one version using layers (and used a semi-translucent rectangle over the base layer of the slide to get the dimming effect - similar to what Phil mentioned above), and the other version using lightboxes. The biggest difference I saw is that the lightboxes dim the entire player, whereas the layers only dim the slide view area.

I'm curious to hear your thoughts on the two sample versions in my file, and which you would prefer for an interaction where you only need the lightboxed slides for a single interaction. (I'm getting an error message when trying to upload, but will try to get it uploaded shortly).

Harri C

Hi All,

Just to chip in....

When designing content with lightboxes remember that the lightbox significantly reduces the screen size. One of the clients i'm working with at the moment has specifically requested that I not use lighboxes as the resulting screen size is too small on the user's laptops. To get around this I've created 'fake' lightboxes using a semi transparent shape to dim out content (as Phil suggested).

Just a consideration....

Jennifer Boettcher

Following back up on this several months later!  Articulate Support finally got back to me to let me know the file was too large to upload, since I was using a bunch of videos.  I changed my sample lightbox vs. layer media gallery to just have photos, not videos.  That significantly reduced the file size! 

Here it is - let me know your thoughts on which one you would use - layer or lightbox. 

Brian Allen

I agree that with this example it doesn't make much of a difference, in fact would probably be easier with layers to be honest.

Situations where I really like to use a lightbox is where I will be referring to the same slide of content over and over throughout the course.  Using a lightbox saves me from having to recreate the layer on every slide where I need to refer to the content.

Additionally, sometimes I will add a lightboxed slide to my player navigation for course info that I want to have available to the learner persistently throughout the course.  Nice to use for something like "Help" or "Instructions", etc...