8 Replies
David Anderson

How many slides are you talking about? I've seen projects with 400+ slides that performed as well as 10-slide projects.  

Once published you don't have anything to worry about. The only concern could be how  your authoring experience might be if your slides are really loaded, say with high-res images or videos. Your computer setup will also affect performance 

I say go for it-). Insert > save > publish > rinse and repeat. And let us know if you run into any issues. 

Geert De Rycke

Hi Instructional Designer,

The most slides I've ever imported was 824. It took about 4 hours to import, yet I worked fine, what didn't work, was saving it. There was just not enough memory to save it. I kicked out all applications from memory and was finally able to save it.

The main issue with huge slide numbers is the system speed. Although there’s no theoretical limit in the number of slides, there is a practical one. Each time you go into the story view, it’ll take ages (1.5 hours) for it to get rendered.

I have abandoned the idea of having 1 huge story-file that caters for all possible types of training needs my audience may have.

All is cut up in little eatable chuncks and it is my LMS taht caters for linking the modules together in course programmes

Cheers

Geert

Connie Malamed

There will be around 200 slides and I can see that it's taking forever to save. I'm working on a new souped-up computer so I don't think RAM or hard drive space/speed is an issue. If it really does take an excessive time to save, then I can see that that's a performance issue for the developer. That would mean every time I need to make a minor revision, I'd have to wait awhile until it saves. This is interesting because there is no audio or video but lots of graphics. So maybe I'd be best cutting it in half into a Part I and a Part II.

Have you heard anything from the engineers regarding why the save time is so slow?

UPDATE: So the save time varies from rather quick to 5 or more minutes.

Geert De Rycke

Hi ID,

no feedback from the developers on the slowness of saving, simply because the question wasn't asked. 

Yes you are correct, with the huge project I had, every minor change took me at least half a day. The most time was lost rendering the story view. What I now do, is I develop my scenes as separate story files. 

When I need a course, I create a new project, and I import only those I need. This way I have small manageable courses... When a scene needs modifying it just takes a few hours. I delete the old part and reimport the amended one...

cheers

Geert

Geert De Rycke

Hi ID,

we deal a lot with revisions too. Its a lot of logistics to get the aggregated view I admit. 

Nevertheless sometimes there's a need to first educate the client. 

That is showing the advantages of a modular approach. As you already have your scenes in story files you can convince your client that with the material you developed he can have more than 1 tailored course. And even have ad hoc training courses. The latter is how I I educated my customers. Now they are happy with the approach and see courses being developed for audiences they never thought of. 

Cheers

Geert

Connie Malamed

Actually, it turns out it that putting all files into one aggregate improves usability for the poorly designed LMS. That's the only reason why. I'm going to submit a support ticket and see what the techies have to say. Maybe there's a maximum number of slides they recommend. Thanks for your interest and help!