9 Replies
Natalia Mueller

Hi Holly,

This was a good question. It reminds me of a conversation some of us had a little while back. We were talking about getting feedback/edits from SME's, but it was the same main idea. What format did we all use to collect the feedback. Someone shared their template, someone else had the great idea of using a wiki. Here the link to that discussion if you'd like to see some of those ideas.

Steve Flowers

Here's an add-in that lets you collect feedback from inside a Presenter publish. The upside is it's convenient to the user and tracks to the slide. The downside is it's not shared so other reviewers can't see all of the feedback. This drops to a Google spreadsheet, this format is generally easily transformed, filtered, sorted and extended.

https://elearningenhanced.com/products/collect-and-send-feedback-google-docs

The example (use the Review Notes tab):

http://elearningenhanced.com/demos/FeedBackWidget/player.html

Back in 2004-ish I built a consolidated tool that connected boards with discrepancy reports with status streams that indicated approved, ready for review, issues, revised. This worked pretty well but I dropped it since it was early in the "stuff in the cloud" days and not many people used it... Maybe it's time to crack open my design docs, enlist some help and turn it into a service

Holly MacDonald

Hi Steve - that is a cool looking widget and if you want a tester for your idea, let me know. I think it's too big for the stage I'm at - I went with surveymonkey embedded in the last slide, but still want to figure out how to leverage evernote shared notebook in this way. I am sharing a notebook with the client for relevant links/content, design elements and other bits, and it is working pretty well so far. Thanks all, Holly

Simon Perkins

You might like to check out Google Docs and draft something in either Document or (yes, I know you don't want to) Spreadsheet.  Share the link and have people access it from wherever they're based with live updating.  

It also helps to publish drafts that include either slide numbers (in the scrub bar) or the nav bar in full.  The latter is particularly useful for enabling reviewers to access slides (to review) that might otherwise not be accessible if the links to them are incorrect.  Most of my courses have custom nav so it's important to bug test all links - and including the nav bar at this stage really helps with that. 

I think Tom once did a Screenr on using a Google Form to collect/email slide-by-slide feedback too.