21 Replies
Diana Myers

Hi Ashley - I get so many of my resources by following the conversations in the Articulate Community forums.  I also follow the different Articulate blogs along with Cathy Moore, Tim Slade, Bruce Graham, Big Dog Little Dog Instructional Design, Jane Bozarth, Learning. Reinvented (Patti Bryant), The eLearning Coach (Connie Malamed), Allison Nederveld, Craig Hadden, Duarte and a few others. 

Then there are the screenr channels that are amazing - can you say Stephanie Harnett?!?

I guess I could follow some of these folks and others on Twitter, but I'm just not the biggest twitter fan, and while I know there are some great eLearning resources posted on Pinterest, I usually get sidetracked with all the yummy recipes and amazing interior design pins...  not enough time in the day. 

Hope this helps a little!

Diana

John Nixdorf

Admittedly this is very old school (He is of what is called the old school -- a phrase generally meaning any school that seems never to have been young...)

But there is one resource the comprehension of which is easily equal to a PhD in Instructional Design:  The Mager Library, along with a single Robert Mager book Developing Vocational Instruction.

Bruce Graham

As a slight aside to this thread...I do get rather confused (probably age...) when I see the term "curation" being used today. It seems that in many cases it is someone gathering together and redistributing a list of stuff that others have produced, in order to for example, drive people to their site or to develop their brand.

Ashley - I am not saying that this is what is happening here, however, learning search engines and how to use existing bookmark functionality seems a much more effective way to "collect" stuff to me.

A curators lists and collections will, to some extent, always be limited to their abilities and perceptions, so I just prefer to use my own.

David Anderson

Bruce Graham said:

A curators lists and collections will, to some extent, always be limited to their abilities and perceptions, so I just prefer to use my own.

 Curation is personal but that's what makes it so valuable. I'm willing to bet that if each of us shared our Top 10 instructional design blogs, we'd see some overlap (Tom's blog, Cathy's blog) and some individual favorites. That type of insight is really valuable for new users.

When RSS took off (10 yrs ago or so) I remember experts sharing their reading lists (.opml) that anyone could import into their aggregators. I loved that because it helped me recognize the most influential ed-tech blogs.

I tend to rely more on Twitter hashtag searches (keywords) than individual blogs or people. Blogs come and go but keywords are always relevant. 

Ashley Chiasson

Bruce Graham said:

As a slight aside to this thread...I do get rather confused (probably age...) when I see the term "curation" being used today. It seems that in many cases it is someone gathering together and redistributing a list of stuff that others have produced, in order to for example, drive people to their site or to develop their brand.


Bruce - The intent is for me to develop some solid resources for personal reference; not necessarily to share (however, if something calls for sharing, I'll certainly do so!) - I don't really want to drive traffic to my site or develop my brand using these resources, I'm looking to have a list (in one spot) of great resources to consult when I'm finding myself questioning something during my work travels.

I have a small group of references that I use frequently, but I thought it would be nice to see where other folks are looking for reference information, that's all.

Gemma Henderson

Ashley, I was actually going to post about ID books, but thought I'd jump in, because books are resources too!

There is this rather neat post from 2011 about ID books. As I've got the reading bug and wanted to see if there are any recent, useful e-learning or instructional design books anyone can recommend?

Rachel Barnum

@Gemma there's a lot going on right now with "doodling" that I think would be exceptional for e-learning. I recently got The Doodle Revolution and while I haven't finished it yet, it's given me some good ideas. I also recently listened to Connie Malamud's podcast with Lee Lefever about explanation, and he wrote The Art of Explanation which I think would be a great resource as well.

If you'd be interested in a business type read, then The Myth of Multitasking is both a great read and one of the best examples of story learning I've ever read. It's a pretty quick read (I read it in about three days). 

I also have this saved on my wishlist for a future read, and I think it's very applicable to e-learning.

Ashley Chiasson

Gemma - I've seen that post (and LOVE Tom's list of books - I've read many of them)!

Rachel - I'm not sure about the doodle revolution - I'm really not much of an artistic person (well when it comes to drawing/doodling)...do I need to be? or does this book show me how to hone my inner creative to optimize my doodles? :P I am however really interested in The Art of Explanation and The Myth of Multitasking, so I'm going to check both of those ones out - thanks!

Steve Flowers

Doodle Revolution is great as is Mike Rhode's Sketchnote Handbook and Dan Roam's books / Napkin Academy.

I don't think it's so much about getting to be a great artist as it is developing your visual vocabulary. It's like learning another language. And like learning another language, some folks will perfect it and some will learn just enough to get by on vacation. Either way, the skill serves its purpose.

The thing about drawing... It's a very primitive human way of communication. Performed live in front of an audience there is a magical arousal of attention. People want to see what you're trying to communicate.  Even when we do it badly. And even when we draw poorly, we can still communicate well.

Bruce Graham

Steve Flowers said:

Doodle Revolution is great as is Mike Rhode's Sketchnote Handbook and Dan Roam's books / Napkin Academy.

I don't think it's so much about getting to be a great artist as it is developing your visual vocabulary. It's like learning another language. And like learning another language, some folks will perfect it and some will learn just enough to get by on vacation. Either way, the skill serves its purpose.

The thing about drawing... It's a very primitive human way of communication. Performed live in front of an audience there is a magical arousal of attention. People want to see what you're trying to communicate.  Even when we do it badly. And even when we draw poorly, we can still communicate well.

+several
Ashley Chiasson

Interesting - I suppose I just know how awful I am at Cranium's Creative Cat drawing activities (seriously - I can't blame my teammates for never being able to guess what I'm drawing!), so I'm visualizing myself doing that on a whiteboard in front of an audience, and them scratching their heads in bewilderment :P

Steve Flowers

"I can't draw"

That's the place where the learning journey begins And it's a fun stage to transition out of because your skill change can be chronicled and your improvements are tangible and can be self assessed.

Dave Gray offers LOTS of great videos that explain and illustrate methods similar to Dan Roam's. You'll see they both use stick figures. But they've practiced their "signature elements" so much that drawing these is as second nature and as consistent as a signature or any example of handwriting. Just takes a bit of practice - like walking, talking, and riding a bike. :)

Take a look at this fellow's journey from "draws relatively poorly" to "holy crap, that's awesome". This guy chronicled his experience from 2002 to 2014. He used an internet resource to get feedback and advice and kept at it. This thread is a really fantastic illustration of how people can learn with drive, feedback, and encouragement.

Rebecca Fleisch Cordeiro