5 Replies
Andrea Stone

Set Outlook reminders via email or create an Outlook task, so they get a reminder from the system before I have to nag. Make it easy for them with a link. Give due dates and break things up so they don't have to review the whole course at once.  Communicate risks clearly and be transparent. They are the content drivers and stakeholders, so they need to own delays. "In order to make the July 30 deadline, I must have course reviews completed by June 21." Sending updates with a lot of red on them helps. :) Use BaseCamp or other project management tool. Finally, if I can't get people to review on their own, I set up a meeting and we painfully go slide by slide with the whole group. Sometimes a meeting away from their desk is the only time people can focus on something. 

Les Helyes

We set the project timeline pretty much at the kick-off meeting.  Our development calendar runs very tight.  Duh!  When SMEs (and others) commit to doing something at a particular time, we explain to them that any delay on their timeline will impact other projects.  Ultimately, their lack of timely response will delay the deployment of their project since others were on the calendar ahead of them.  It's working for us.  Good luck Rachel.

Cary Glenn

I work as an in-house designer/developer, in my emails I add a line something like, "You prompt feedback is important to this project, we require a response by 'insert date'. If we do not have a reply by then your silence will be taken as consent." I had full backing from my Manager on this and it wasn't very often that I had to use it.