2 Replies
Jesse Anderson

One of the breakout sessions at DevLearn last week focussed on using these as a part of Design Thinking. I thought they were a unique brainstorming idea that could prove quite helpful. We were only given a few minutes to sort through the 100+ cards to identify what might be most helpful in a specific scenario, which made it a little overwhelming. If I had one complaint it would be that some of the cards seem redundant or overly broad. 

I could see them as a tool I could used when trying to identify the best technique for delivering information to my organization. I don't think i'd go through every card for every project, but especially if I was struggling to nail down what the best training tools for a given project might be. From a strictly eLearning perspective, I don't think they would be quiteas useful.

Alison  L.

From a strictly eLearning perspective, I don't think they would be quiteas useful.

I thought this was an interesting insight, especially when the LBC site touts that 60 of their 108 are good for digital.

I just stumbled on this in over halfway through 2021, so I wonder if they've ever been updated. 

Also, I don't think I've ever heard Nick Floro talk about them at DevLearn (though there are a couple of DevLearns I've missed in the past 6 years- like 2015 & 2017 (SIDE NOTE: I am so going to DL'21 even if I have to bring a respirator!- i got one for last years..) 

I also wonder, just because it says "X" that doesn't mean you can necessarily go out and DO it. eg. While "checklist" is an easy one, "Game" is another.  

Seems like something that sounded like a good idea, but never really got off the ground (used in wider circles)