35 Replies
Cary Glenn

The "10% of what we read" meme is a myth. Will Thalheimer explains the issues about it here. http://www.willatworklearning.com/2006/05/people_remember.html

I've come to learn to never trust statistics that end up in nice round numbers; not without at least seeing the original research. Statistics just don't play nice that way.

And William Glasser had nothing to do with it at all.

Phil Mayor

Motor Skills are closely associated with Cognition

  • There is a clear connection in the circuitry of the brain between areas controlling fine motor skills and areas controlling cognition.
  • These areas are developing simultaneously, with exceptional speed during early brain development.
  • Motor skills are a proven indicator of future math and reading success.

My instructor will always say "learn one skill well instead of 4 badly, it could save your life!"

Melanie Sobie

The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.

                                                                                                    - Hans Hofmann

You are done creating your presentation when there is nothing else that can be taken out.

                                                                                                   - Author Unknown

OWEN HOLT

Melanie Sobie said:

The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.

                                                                                                    - Hans Hofmann

You are done creating your presentation when there is nothing else that can be taken out.

                                                                                                   - Author Unknown

I think I am going to use that last one in an upcoming presentation on presentations. Thanks Melanie.

And thank you to everyone else sharing your thoughts here. Keep them coming!

Joshua Roberts

“A game is an opportunity to focus our energy, with relentless optimism, at something we’re good at (or getting better at) and enjoy. In other words, gameplay is the direct emotional opposite of depression.” 
― Jane McGonigalReality Is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World

Some gamification words...

john faulkes

"What people take notice of when you communicate with them is 7% the words you say. 30% your tone of voice. 63% your body language". Often used by trainers, sometimes even quoting the researcher, Albert Mehrabian. He didn't quite say that and it's totally out of the context he originally studied. Nevertheless, if you don't take the figures too literally, it's a pretty useful message.

"A class year at Harvard was once studied and it was noted that 3 of the students committed their life goals to paper. The others did not. Some twenty years later, the whole class was followed up and it was found that each of these 3 individuals was worth more than all of the 'others' put together." I've seen this used on several occasions by trainers. Quite an inspirational story, quite well known. Unfortunately a complete myth. But nevertheless, fairly sound advice!

Robert Dilts was one of the acolytes of Bandler and Grinder, who developed and popularised NLP. He is credited with developing the 'Logical Levels' model. One of the assertions of this is that 'beliefs' are embedded in one's personality at a lower and more fundamental level than learned behaviours. Therefore, attempts we all make to change and develop can easily be scuppered by 'stuck' beliefs about ourselves. Never in the field of human disagreement, debate and academic/scientific anger have I read so much vitriol and scorn being poured on a model as was levied against this one. Nevertheless, it works very well for me, and very many people I've talked to!