Live Presentation Help Requested.

I am doing a live presentation for an agency in the Federal Government, on business automation. I know the information here is based on online learning.  However, I was wondering...

1. If anyone had any suggestions on how to make great slides for a live presentation. (The audience will NOT be able to press buttons, click triggers or etc).

2. If anyone had any suggestions on what would like nice to add as images beside a copier and a cellphone.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

10 Replies
Cary Glenn

There is nothing inherently wrong with PowerPoint. It is how it is used by people that gives it a bad name. You don't blame a hammer for building a crooked house. Have you read Slide:ology by Nancy Duarte or Presentationzen Design by Garr Reynolds. Either of these books is a great resource for designing great presentations.

Bruce Graham

Cary Glenn said:

There is nothing inherently wrong with PowerPoint. It is how it is used by people that gives it a bad name. You don't blame a hammer for building a crooked house. Have you read Slide:ology by Nancy Duarte or Presentationzen Design by Garr Reynolds. Either of these books is a great resource for designing great presentations.

Completely agreed.
Dave Neuweiler

The greatest slides for a live presentation are those that do these two things:

First, they keep YOU on the track that you've planned for your discussion. As an example, if you get sidetracked, or forget what to say next ... all you have to do is go to the next slide for your own cue.

Second, they can help illicit responses and/or participation from your audience. Think of this in two ways. You can gain insights on the likes/dislikes/needs for office automation from your audience by asking open-ended questions on slides. You can also re-direct the conversation. As an example, one of your slides asks, say, "What's the worst thing that you've seen happen because of office automation?" Participant "A" gives an answer, but perhaps not what you were expecting. You can say something like, "That's an interesting point ..." and then turn to participant "B" and ask, "What do YOU think about that?"

The whole idea is to script and control your presentation.

And don't work about the graphics. If you get a good conversation going, you won't need them, unless you feel the need for eye-candy.

Hope that helps!

Dave