12 Replies
Natalia Mueller

Hi Stewart, 

A warm welcome to the community! I imagine you'll get a range of answers since some of it comes down to preference. There are always exceptions but my preference is that I use layers when I'm building graphics on a slide and the next screen(s) will be using some of the same graphics), building an interaction or adding feedback.

I find this easier because the functionality of Storyline layers makes the above reasons pretty easy to execute. Plus it creates a logical grouping for me in the project. In the end it's just about what works for me in the design process. I'm driven by what each section needs and am not so much worried about how many of each I end up with.

Again, welcome to the group! I hope to see you around the forums some more!

Natalia

Tim Shelton

There are many ways to tackle a problem like this: states, layers and slides. We tend to develop using a mixture of all three, breaking content up into subjects or learning objectives makes this process easier.

Groups of information, quizzes or subjects should be defined as slides as this is the most logical way to break up the content.

Once you know what you need to say on a given slide we create the design learning point. If we have surplus information or we want to link to text from an interaction we use layers to expand on the main layout.

You may also wish to show something in sequence within the same object/space in which case states work best.

Miranda Verswijvelen

I always tend to make that decision based on whether the info provided is about one concept/partial concept, process etc. If the material you want to provide really belongs together and is basically inseparable, I use layers. Otherwise I will always choose an extra slide. Click- and-reveal can be a bit overused in our industry and I see that learners are experiencing a certain tiredness towards the 'click here to learn more' stuff, which often disguises the fact that you have too much text and too little action.

Daniel Brigham

Hi, Stewart: Sort of depends on background to some extent. If you are coming from PowerPoint and Studio 09 background, you may be more comfortable with a greater number of slides. If you've been working with Storyline from the past few years, you'll probably be using more layers.

If I can keep information all one one slide, I will do that.

Edie Egwuonwu

I agree with a lot of what has been said here... my thinking is around subliminal messaging to the learner. Like Miranda, I want self-contained content to be self-contained on the slide. So if in my outline/design structure there is content that should be related to a singular concept in the learner's mind, I try to keep it to a single slide. I somehow feel like "next" buttons send a subliminal message of "next" concept.

Jerson  Campos

Miranda Verswijvelen said:

I always tend to make that decision based on whether the info provided is about one concept/partial concept, process etc. If the material you want to provide really belongs together and is basically inseparable, I use layers. Otherwise I will always choose an extra slide. 


I tend to follow this concept stated by Miranda.  

Meridith Litton

Don't forget that you also have Scenes to assist in chunking concepts.  I start with determining what concepts are needed to be taught, which sets my Scenes.  From there, I usually add an Introduction to the first slide of each Scene, setting the stage for the concept.  After that, if I'm using a video/screen capture, that goes to a separate slide and,depending on the amount of narration and animation needed on a slide, I'll use one slide or multiple slides to continue the lesson.  Yes, you can build an entire course on one slide, but trying to revise layer 6 of 15 layers is almost impossible.

Stephan Sinka

Lloyd Dennington said:

Yes, you can build an entire course on one slide, ..... but trying to revise layer 6 of 15 layers is almost impossible.

Impossible?? Editing a layer it’s no different than a slide. In fact I’ve come to see layers as a subset of slides that have no next button to initiate their viewing. Instead I get to ‘trigger’ them into appearing from any object,action (click, hover, state change etc.) or just the timeline. I’ve even had layers trigger other layers! The creative possibilities seem endless. That’s why Storyline is so exciting…..finding new interactive ways to show information making it responsive to the learners immediate needs, wants or curiosities-whatever motivates their learning. After all you can always remember a great story especially if you were part of the telling of it. That’s what our courses should be; great stories that involve the audience fostering a ‘tell me more’ spirit of learning!

Stephan Sinka

Tim Shelton said:

There are many ways to tackle a problem like this: states, layers and slides. We tend to develop using a mixture of all three, breaking content up into subjects or learning objectives makes this process easier.


Since the ultimate goal is smooth user experience does anybody have any thoughts on the efficiency of states vs layers vs slides?

I would love to get some feedback as to speed of execution (i.e. no delays in display or long uploads) when for example using strictly multiple object states  or layers vs many slides. I can only guess that there may be some advantage of using layers on a single slide as all the information would be uploaded together vs multiple slides. But at some point the scale must tip ( for example +20 layers on a single slide?) Please look at this previous  post  http://community.articulate.com/forums/p/49443/265938.aspx#265938

some more thoughts on this.

Cheers