Video Editing Software for eLearning

What are all of you using and what do you like?  I am a PC user and am budgeting money for 2012 for video editing software.  Wanting the best bang for my buck.  Currently looking at CyberLink Power Director 9 Ultra but it seems to crash alot and I've read the support is bad.  However, it has great product reviews for a consumer software program.

Suggestions welcome!  Certainly want green screen functionality and a nice library of transitions/effects.

18 Replies
Steve Flowers

I haven't used it since I switched to Mac but I remember having great luck with Vegas / Sony:

http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/moviestudiohd/compare

This contains a decent library of transitions and effects and also supports Chromakey. Not bad for $49. And they offer a time-limited trial if you want to give her a whirl.

Steve

David Steffek

If all you're looking to do is basic editing (simple cuts, etc.) then the Movie Maker program included with Windows should suffice.

If you're looking for more power with not a lot of expense. I've been using Pinnacle/Avid Studio for years. Multi-track audio/video, motion title generator, soundtrack generator, chroma key, lots of plugins/effects.

ben almeer

MoviePlus is an ideal software package for beginners, MoviePlus Starter Edition is the amazing free Video editing software from Serif. This version is to keep so just download it right now and start creating your very own videos today!  With some amezing features..

  • Import, export and edit (WMV, AVI & MOV)
  • Add transitions and effects
  • Includes pan and zoom effect
  • Cut and Trim
  • Easy drag-and-drop editing

Regard's

Ben Almeer

Nitrotek

Rich Johnstun

Looks like this thread is a little late, but I highly recommend Sony Vegas Pro. I currently have Adobe Premier, Final Cut Pro and Sony Vegas Pro installed on my machine and Vegas is the one I use daily. It's well priced for the feature set, has a intuitive work flow and there is a lot of YouTube support. 

Jerson  Campos

It really depends on what you want to be able to do with the software. I've never used Vegas Pro, but I have used Premier, Premier Elements, and After Effects. Both Premier and After Effects are professional level editing software Premier is mostly just video editing, while After Effects is to create special effects, but you can still edit video quite easily. Both have steep learning curves. If you want to test the waters and go with a beginner version, I would suggest getting Premier Elements. Its quite powerful and you can export to a variety of formats and sizes and its only a $100.

Rich Johnstun

Jonathan Workman said:

Good discussion here!  I actually ended up going with Sony Vegas Pro.  Having some video editing experience in the past, this wasn't too hard of a transition and what I couldn't figure out, I just went to YouTube and let a 12 year old kid teach me (no kidding).


That same 12 year old kid teaches me all the time as well  

Are you running 11 or 12?  I'm still running 11 and haven't seen any big reason to jump to 12.  I did find out this weekend that if you are working with .mov files in Vegas 11, you don't want to upgrade Quicktime past 7.7.1 as Vegas apparently doesn't like the codec.  I had to downgrade my Quicktime to work with the video I shot on my iPhone. 

ben almeer

Blender is a a 3D graphics video creation program which hosts a variety of features. These include modeling, animation, rendering, post-production and real-time interactive 3D, as well as  game creation. Playback with cross-platform compatibility for Blender is also included along with support for Windows, Mac and Linux.

Regard's,

Ben Almeer,

Click Here For More Info

Eric Nalian

Simple question - I plan on getting Serif in a few days.  I plan on using it for the most basic video editing - cutting out the mistakes.  Can it do that?  Does it do the audio at the same time, or does that have to be edited separately?

Windows Movie Maker just isn't cutting it anymore.

-Eric

Jacinta Penn

AVS Video Editor is incredibly cheap and very easy to use. The video that comes out is good quality, and the software isn't too complex, like some of the above, good for a video editing beginner such as myself, who doesn't want to do a lot of fancy stuff.  They also have a video converter, great for making flv files.

Rich Johnstun

Since this just popped up again, the newest version of Camtasia is actually a decent video editor. I wouldn't spend the money on it just for that, but if you have it already it's worth messing with. 

I've also been recommending Sony Movie Studio to my friends for cutting together their home movies and such. It would work fine for the vast majority of what people are doing and can be had for well under $100.