152 Replies
Tess Farley

Here's a list of some programs that I found a while back when I was looking.  I just add to it as I find more.  Some of them are degree programs and some are certificate.  Not all of them are online.

Leah Hemeon

I've been investigating this too and in Canada found several programs that would be appropriate. I have a colleague who completed the Masters of Learning and Technology at Royal Roads University (Victoria, BC, Canada). She highly recommends the program. They also offer a certificate version - same program but for the certificate you stop after the first year. You can do the program online for the most part with a two week residency at the beginning of each program year.

http://www.royalroads.ca/program/learning-and-technology-ma

Steve Flowers

I'll second James'  recommendation for Boise State. I work with someone that graduated from BSU and the quality of the program shines through regularly. I also know one of the instructors in the program and you can't go wrong.

I know plenty of folks from the Florida State and San Diego State pipeline as well. I've participated in the San Diego program. These, along with Indiana are well respected programs. Each of which, I believe, offers a certificate program. All of which are listed on Tess' list above.

I think the best approach is to figure out what types of tasks and outcomes you're most interested in attaining and shop for a program that matches this most closely. Curricula vary greatly from school to school.

@Tess -

That's a great list

Laura Fried

I have really enjoyed the two pre-conference Certificate Programs that I've taken with the eLearning Guild offers prior to Learning Solutions or DevLearn.  I find that 8 hours with a subject matter expert and a small group of like-minded professionals gives me a lot of learning for a reasonable price, and the best part is that I actually learn something and can apply it to my work (and even remember something a year later!)  

Steve Flowers

$12518 seems fairly low. I'm guessing that's for in-state.  Costs per credit hour can be as high as $750-$1250. That would make that same graduate degree 24k - 45k. In my opinion, that's not really reasonable. Some would disagree, considering that career prospects and pay are likely to increase. Either way, 12.5k seems attractive in comparison

James Brown

If you can get on as a SA, your tuition is waived. I personally fronted the cost and I for one will tell you for an online course it's not easy by any means but it was worth the time and money. One learning theory course I took involved ton of research and writing and by the time the course was over I was burned out. However that course really did a nice job preparing me for my final comprehensive exams. Here's the nice part. Since I graduated from Boise, I only need 1 year to complete my Ed D and I'm actually shooting for a free scholarship or to employment as a SA for one of my previous  instructors. Anyway that's my next goal. Plus Boise is accredited and they do not charge out of state tuition as many other universities do. It's truly an awesome program and I only have positive things to say about my instructors.

Phil Weber

I came here to ask a similar question and found this thread. I'm looking for something a bit more specific: I'd like to take some online courses that are not mired in 50-year-old theory: Bloom, Mager, ADDIE, "learning styles", etc. Instead, I'd like classes that cover the latest thinking: Michael Allen's Context, Challenge, Activity, Feedback method, for example, and Cathy Moore's Action Mapping approach. Do such courses exist?

David Anderson

I talked to a few people who found Rio Salado's online certificate program helpful http://www.riosalado.edu/programs/elearning/Pages/default.aspx

At the time - year+ ago - the program taught from E-learning by Design and Graphics for Learning. so I think it balanced theory and real-world projects.

The people I talked to were  ILT trainers and a project manager who were transitioning (involuntarily) into instructional design/elearning roles. 

Rachel Reed

James Brown said:

If you can get on as a SA, your tuition is waived. I personally fronted the cost and I for one will tell you for an online course it's not easy by any means but it was worth the time and money. One learning theory course I took involved ton of research and writing and by the time the course was over I was burned out. However that course really did a nice job preparing me for my final comprehensive exams. Here's the nice part. Since I graduated from Boise, I only need 1 year to complete my Ed D and I'm actually shooting for a free scholarship or to employment as a SA for one of my previous  instructors. Anyway that's my next goal. Plus Boise is accredited and they do not charge out of state tuition as many other universities do. It's truly an awesome program and I only have positive things to say about my instructors.


I looked at the Boise State site, and maybe this is a silly question (or maybe i'm looking in the wrong place) but it lists a Masters of Educational Technology and a Masters of Science in Ed. Tech.  Is this there version of Instructional Design...or does the fact it mentions Technology mean something more? 

I guess what I'm trying to ask is...does the "technology" in the name just mean it focuses on e-learning and learning using technology as mediums...or does it mean you actually become a guru on the technical aspects of the technology?

Evette Minns

I am currently an elearning student at Rio Salado Community College.  Here is a link to the program specifics: http://www.riosalado.edu/programs/elearning/Pages/certificate.aspx .  Don't let the inexpensive fees deter you from a quality education. Just take a look at the great source materials used in the program: Elearning by Design- William Horton; Designing Effective Instruction - Morrison, Ross and Kemp;and elearning and the Science of Instruction: Proven Guidelines for consurmers and designers of multimedia.  

Joe Fournier

I started as of last Fall working on my PhD in Instructional Design and Technology via distance at Old Dominion University (Norfolk, VA). Great program with some of the leading thinkers in our field (both students and faculty). As grace would have it, I ended up learning about my current job through a classmate and got hired by a firm in Virginia Beach. So, I'm still a distance learner, but I'm close enough to show up for class every now and then--which I think has great benefits for networking and collaboration.

Kris Talynn

Let's here it for Boise State!  I'm a graduate student in their program right now and I LOVE IT!!!  They offer two different e-learning type certificates, a human performance technology certificate and a masters.  The instructors/professors are knowledgeable and the resources are great.  It's also very reasonably priced for a masters program.  I'd highly recommend it.  If anyone is interested, I'd be happy to give you contact info to any of the profs or the dept secretary.  She's outstanding!

Joe Deegan

I'm getting close to finishing my Masters in Ed Tech at San Diego State and have learned a ton along the way and have made some connections that have already helped in my career.  I started by earning the Certificate in Instructional Technology and have transitioned into the Masters program.  Great thing is all the units I earned in the certificate program count towards the Masters.  It's a ton of work but well worth it for the knowledge you will gain and connections you will make with others in the field.

Kris Talynn

Josh, I'm not sure what the workload in the MET program is.  In the M. IPT program, it's manageable while working full-time.  I also work full-time while going to school.  I've been in the program for four semesters thus far and I've taken two classes per semester like you plan to do.  It takes a lot of hard work and dedication but it's worth it.  My classes are all online which offers a ton of flexibility but requires committment.  When I started I told myself that I'd go to "school" two nights a week and then a certain number of hours on the weekend.  What I've found is that it works better for me to just remember deadlines and work with those because my schedule doesn't allow "school" on dedicated nights.

Joe, the BSU masters program also has three different certificates that all count towards the masters.  By the time I'm done I'll have a graduate certificate in human performance technology, a graduate certificate in workplace e-learning performance support and my masters.