Rise 360 HTML export, javascript API

We're starting to look at Rise360 to build eLearning courses. We want to be able to export these as HTML and include into our platform using an iFrame. We'd also like to be able to track when certain parts of the learning has been accessed. Is there any kind of javascript API embedded into the learning, perhaps events are fired when learning content is viewed that we can hook into and use to track?

I haven't been able to find any docs related to any of this.

Thanks in advance

12 Replies
Steven Oddy

Hi Alyssa,

Thank you for this, I'm aware that we can export as web only, we've done this and got hosted on AWS S3 so that part is all good. The question was more referring to the javascript API part? Once we have the exported web version of the course, how do we tap into what the learner has viewed?

Thanks

Steve

Matthew Bibby
Steven Oddy

The question was more referring to the javascript API part? Once we have the exported web version of the course, how do we tap into what the learner has viewed?

The easiest way to do that is to publish the course for Tin Can API and to either purchase or build a system that can capture the statements being sent by the course.

Any other method is going to take a lot of custom work (and involve editing the published output which for an undertaking like this is not advisable).

The beauty of Tin Can is that the content can be stored wherever you want (e.g. S3) and will still be able to send the messages back to the LRS.

To learn more about Tin Can API, see here (note that xAPI is another name for Tin Can API). 

Dave Cox

Hi Crystal,

As a corporate developer, we always have the concern of backing up files for future updates. We don't always know who will do those backup, and the players often change as people come and go. Therefore we need the ability to download the source files, and all assets to a repository where we keep them for future development activities. The person who performs an update may be a new person with the company, or might not even know the original developers, so we can't depend on the ability to copy a file from one developer to another. What we need is the ability to download the entire contents from one developer to the repository. Then at a later time a different developer would need to upload to their account to continue development for any required updates. Instructional design is a very volatile profession, and many developers are only short time contractors, that move around a lot, so there is high turn over of developers.