E-Learning Challenge #33

Happy Friday, E-Learning Heroes!

Last week we took a fun—and slightly painful—look at common e-learning mistakes. You came up with some classic mistakes that we’ve all made at one time or another.

This week, it’s time to clean up your mess. Yep. You made the mess, now you clean it up!

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to give your slides a proper makeover. Assume the bad slide designs were given to you by your client and that it’s your job to make them right.

If you listed the mistakes you made, use that list to guide your makeover. Tell us how you addressed each mistake in your makeover.

This is a great opportunity for you to demonstrate your design approach while helping new users see how to fix similar issues.

Alternative Challenge

What if I missed last week’s challenge?

If you skipped last week’s challenge, you can still participate!  Here’s what you can do:

  1. Create a slide or two showing common e-learning mistakes
  2. List the mistakes you made in the comments section below or on your personal blog
  3. Correct your mistakes in a new slide and tell us what you did to fix the slides

Be sure to include the mistakes you made in the comment section so other folks can focus easily on your specific mistakes.

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to clean up your e-learning mistakes.

Last week’s challenge

Before you start cleaning house, take a look at some of the silly mistakes e-learning designers make:

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.

Wishing you a mistake-free week, E-Learning Heroes!

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

48 Comments
Dan Sweigert
Nick Russell

A timely reminder, Bruce of the good old 'W-H' questions. But your admonition was too harsh; please give us our Q3 bonuses back! Loved your scenario-based training concept Dan. I was even quite keen on your bad version because you had a good story to tell and draw the user into a real dilemma. But your makeover version was really classy. I liked the contrast of the characters in color set against a monochrome background The office/warehouse backdrop has a lot of depth and creates further interest and realism. It’s also great to see you use photo-characters that are not part of the Storyline default suite; they seem more real with their wrinkles and imperfections. I’m not sure about the need for a tapescript. You have great narration skills and I guess, unless your users are non-native... Expand

Nick Russell

In my original drag and drop exercise I had a dig at some of the simplistic and pointless learning interactions that I’ve seen over the years; quite often they are to do with healthy eating or recycling and are usually commissioned by local government or health authorities, They frequently make the mistake of treating their ‘clients’ like kindergarten children or worse like morons. In my 'before' version. my stage-props were misaligned and grossly out of scale; I used the boring default grey player, buttons, and stock photo-character; all very clichéd. I also added some inane background music and exaggerated sound effects. In my ‘improved’ version I was inspired by the beautiful countryside in spring of my native East Sussex to make a more emotional appeal. http://benchmarkengli... Expand

Nick Russell

In my original drag and drop exercise I had a dig at some of the simplistic and pointless learning interactions that I’ve seen over the years; they are usually to do with healthy eating or recycling and quite often commissioned by local government or health authorities, They frequently make the mistake of treating their ‘clients’ like kindergarten children or worse like morons. In my ‘before’ version, objects were misaligned and grossly out of scale; I used the boring default grey player, buttons, and stock photo-character; all very clichéd. I also added some inane background music and exaggerated sound effects. In my ‘improved’ version I was inspired by the beautiful spring countryside of my native East Sussex to make a more emotional appeal. http://benchmarkenglish.net/pat2/st... Expand

Dan Sweigert

I know this is a bit off topic, but I just wanted to share this great quote from Theodore Roosevelt, because you guys here in the e-learning community, participating in these challenges and getting on the forums to help your fellow e-learning designers/developers are the "doers" of this world. Here it is: "It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends hims... Expand