Future of eLearning authoring tools: where are things headed?

Posted Friday, April 19, 2013 at 7:27 AM  

Good morning-

 

I'm working on a presentation for my leadership team. The topic is on eLearning authoring tools and where things are going.

 

We recently purchased Storyline and are  excited about the interactive and mobile experiences we can deliver. I'm trying to prepare some Q&A topics around where the industry is going. 

 

Is HTML5 the future? Are desktop or cloud-based services the future?

 

What do you think?


All Replies

Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 at 7:50 AM  

HTML5 has the great potential to be the future, however it has a long road ahead. Perhaps, the buzz in the industry around HTML5 is mostly the momentum. Every application in the web out there (e.g. youtube.com) has already adopted to HTML5 or adopting at this point.The tech industry is changing fast and adopting to HTML5 much faster probably than any other technology invented in the past.

 

However when it comes to e-learning, it's not about just playing one piece of audio or video. We need to provide a full learning experience with a tons of content well-organized. 

 

Achieving a great learning experience that we have been doing with Flash over the years cannot be replaced with HTML5 overnight. There are tons of limitations and compatibility issues and our learners don't bother which technology or tool we use all they care (esp. at the corporate level) about trouble free learning.

 

So my recommendation is take one step at at time and be very cautious before planning big transitions with HTML5: 

 

I also invite to read my post about HTML5 (i am also planning to write more articles concentrating the HTML5 and E-Learning in specific)

HTML5 is a real game changer for the tech industry?


 

 


User Rank Tim Slade

354 posts

Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 at 8:10 AM  

I think HTML 5 will be one aspect of the future...but, like any standard, it will change/evolve over time.

In terms of eLearning authoring tools specifically, I think we will continue to see a great emphasis on the ability to create highly interactive and dynamic content with no need for coding. Storyline is a great example of this and I think it will only continue to skyrocket.  

Also, I think mobile learning (mLearning) will make a greater presence. Tablets are becoming more popular for quickly obtaining information…it only makes sense for learning to be delivered this way as well. Again, Storyline is doing a good job of this and it will only continue. I think the biggest obstacle here, is getting LMSs to be mobile friendly.

I’m sure I missed a few other things, but these are just some ideas off the top of my head.

-Tim

 


James Klark

1 posts

Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 at 9:47 AM  

html5 has been around since quite long still its hasn't established as it should have.


User Rank Steve Flowers

3,926 posts

Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 at 10:02 AM  

The way ahead, in my opinion, is breaking the default molds and changing expectations for packaging. Slide-based presentation shells are a great choice for some situations but not for all. Unfortunately, most tools target the slide-based pattern with little choice for supporting alternatives. I think this is part of the reason HTML5 hasn't been consistently successful with e-learning outputs. We seem to have this expectation of pixel perfect placement that gets in the way of what HTML5 was really meant to do... The base unit of HTML5 is the element / tag -- built to be enhanced with *just enough* css or JavaScript to get the job done. We're twisting that pattern when we build complicated JavaScript assembly to try and get everything to behave just right on a slide (and it rarely does because of browser differences).

 

The future is smaller things that can be mixed, matched, and remixed depending on the context or need. Stuff I call connectables that could end the behemoths and monoliths of content worship that we've trained ourselves to expect Yep, I build these too sometimes (even as it kills my soul to design this way). 

 

Pathways, trailheads, artifacts, and power-ups that appear when needed, can be combined into more powerful formations on the fly, and can be folded based on participant and performer preference to serve up "just the facts, just the steps, or just a little extra assistance" to get someone within the range of what they need to do or further up the path to proficiency.

 

Slide-based package defaults are not the future. They are part of the future. But we gotta get past the mindset to see what's next.


Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 at 10:50 AM  

Couldn't agree with you more! May be HTML5 is not meant for the slide style e-learning, and we are forcefully using it that way unfortunately (whether we like it or not). It also happens because many clients expressing their 'resistance' for such creative changes :(

 

Steve Flowers said:

The way ahead, in my opinion, is breaking the default molds and changing expectations for packaging. Slide-based presentation shells are a great choice for some situations but not for all. Unfortunately, most tools target the slide-based pattern with little choice for supporting alternatives. I think this is part of the reason HTML5 hasn't been consistently successful with e-learning outputs. We seem to have this expectation of pixel perfect placement that gets in the way of what HTML5 was really meant to do... The base unit of HTML5 is the element / tag -- built to be enhanced with *just enough* css or JavaScript to get the job done. We're twisting that pattern when we build complicated JavaScript assembly to try and get everything to behave just right on a slide (and it rarely does because of browser differences).

 

The future is smaller things that can be mixed, matched, and remixed depending on the context or need. Stuff I call connectables that could end the behemoths and monoliths of content worship that we've trained ourselves to expect Yep, I build these too sometimes (even as it kills my soul to design this way). 

 

Pathways, trailheads, artifacts, and power-ups that appear when needed, can be combined into more powerful formations on the fly, and can be folded based on participant and performer preference to serve up "just the facts, just the steps, or just a little extra assistance" to get someone within the range of what they need to do or further up the path to proficiency.

 

Slide-based package defaults are not the future. They are part of the future. But we gotta get past the mindset to see what's next.



 


Todd Thornton

122 posts

Posted Monday, April 22, 2013 at 3:15 PM  

I predict the future of e-learning tools will be as clear as this math explanation. 

 


Posted Monday, April 29, 2013 at 12:17 PM  

That is a great question.

And one I'm hoping to have answered in June.

Why June, well that is when my ASTD Chapter (ASTD Golden Gate) is starting it's Summer of eLearning with a panel of thought leaders looking at what is the state and the future of eLearning.

Other events will see a certain well know Hero from this community doing a couple of workshops as well as monthly meetings on topics such as How to create a mobile learning strategy and What eLearning designers need to know about HMTL5.
Details will be on the ASTD Golden Gate web site very soon. (http://astdgoldengate.org )


 


David Becker

106 posts

Posted Monday, April 29, 2013 at 5:15 PM  

Learner initiated learning moments - Google glass, augmented reality apps etc

Full body immersive simulated learning environments - Occulus Rift, LeapMotion etc

Better analytics that isolates and aligns the impact of learning something with better performance (eg I could do 10 billing processes per hour on SAP before the course, now directly after the course I can do 15)

Personalised learning - Using AI to build learning pathways on the fly or pathways that change to suit my learning needs, learning style, time of day - http://www.knewton.com/ etc

Cognitive measurement and enhancement through pharmaceuticals, TransCranial Magnetic stimulation, brainwave measurement etc

 


Eric Gibson

2 posts

Posted Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at 2:48 PM  

In addition to the evolution of HTML5, I am particularly interested in how standards will evolve to keep up with technology.

 

I appreciate the forward thinking of the great folks at Articulate in being early adopters of the TinCan API and I am excited to see that in action.  With the release of version 1.0 of the standard, I'm hoping that some of the Larger LMS organizations will step up their plans to add this the their product development roadmap....Oracle/Taleo, ahem...

 

While HTML5 does have some success in the mobile world, TinCan promises to expand on that capability.

 

Check out tincanapi.com if you haven't had a chance to yet