7 Replies
Alyssa Gomez

Hi Michael!

The fill-in-the-blank question type is great for questions that have a single-word or a short phrase correct answer. 

If you're looking for an open-ended, free-text question, I suggest embedding a survey from a third-party tool (like Google Forms or Survey Monkey) using a Multimedia Embed block. 

Use this iFrame code format for easy embedding!
<iframe src="URL HERE"></iframe>

Joan York

I am wondering about the same thing, so thanks for the question & answer.   I have courses that need "reflection" questions.  I tried the survey options and they work, but they're not perfect for my purpose.  Couldn't a Storyline slide be brought in for this?

I've also tried using the fill-in-the-blank knowledge check for this purpose.  The only problem is that the feedback always says "Incorrect".  If there were a way to turn this off, that might work too.

Andreas Bak

"Joan York 

I've also tried using the fill-in-the-blank knowledge check for this purpose.  The only problem is that the feedback always says "Incorrect".  If there were a way to turn this off, that might work too."

I've got similar experience. I really want the learner to pause, and think. For this I use the fill in blank. In the end, I'm not interested in exactly what they write, instead I offer a more general remark as feedback. Thing is, displaying "Incorrect" feels like you did something wrong.

If that message, and icon, could be altered, or just disabled, that would make my week.

Renz Sevilla

Hi Andrea, thanks for your feedback! 

If you're looking for an open-ended, free-text question, I suggest embedding a survey from a third-party tool (like Google Forms or Survey Monkey) using a Multimedia Embed block. 

Use this iFrame code format for easy embedding!
<iframe src="URL HERE"></iframe>

That being said, we're tracking requests for a survey block. If we make any changes that help, we'll be sure to update this thread.

Doug Bedinger

To provide an opportunity for learners to reflect on an idea or topic, I have used a variable field in Storyline.  After the learner fills it in, I can display it later on an other slide to provide a summary of all their thoughts on a single slide that they can print out for future reference.