Zombie Survival Training (Challenge #55) Posted Friday, October 17, 2014 at 2:01 PM

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At times it seems like a course designer’s work is never done. Whether it’s battling corporate malfeasance, improving vocabulary, solving world health issues, or fixing e-learning mistakes, there’s always a new training opportunity. The weekly e-learning challenges were designed to help course designers develop the skills to take on any training challenge… including the Zombie Apocalypse.


This is no joke. Even the Defense Department has a zombie survival plan in place. It’s called CONOP 888 and it’s a how-to guide for military planners trying to isolate the threat from a menu of the undead—from chicken zombies to vegetarian zombies and even "evil magic zombies"—and destroy them. E-learning just got real! 

 

Scenario planning for a zombie apocalypse is what this week’s challenge is all about. Before moving into the challenge, check out some of the creative, zombie-themed games, and interactions course designers shared in the community.

 

Zombie College: 5 Rules of Lab Safety

A serene college campus in western North Carolina has a dark secret. Watch Zombie College, the short film. Play the mini-game and help Jack and Amy escape! Listen to the song, and download classroom activities.

 

View Zombie College: 5 Rules of Lab Safety

 

 

Rigger Mortis

Community member Jerson Campos shared an illustrated zombie character in the forums. To demonstrate how the character could be used, Jerson created a short interactive story.

 

View Rigger Mortis

 

Zombie Apocalypse Survival: Quiz

Simple but lengthy quiz helps you determine your survival readiness. Lots of good content ideas in this one.

 

View the most comprehensive Zombie Survival quiz

 

Zombie Apocalypse Quiz

How long would you survive a zombie apocalypse?

 

View the Zombie Apocalypse Quiz

 

Zombie Feud?

Okay this game doesn’t exist, yet I can’t help but think that some of the creative demos folks shared in earlier challenges could be used as the foundation for your Zombie survival guide. Dan's E-Learning Feud is begging for a zombie makeover.

 

E-Learning Feud by Dan Sweigert

 

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to design a training interaction, job aid, or mini-course to help learners prepare for and survive the Zombie Apocalypse.

 

Resources

Here are a few resources, templates, and articles that could help your course planning.


Community freebies

Community discussions

More ideas and resources

E-Learning Heroes Freebies: PowerPoint  | Storyline

 

Your starting point doesn’t have to be a zombie-themed template. Instead, try working from a corporate template or game that features the interaction you want. Once you have that in place, you can apply your zombie design.


E-Learning challenges and templates

Check out our free PowerPoint and Storyline downloads for starter templates. The e-learning challenges are another great source for ideas and inspiration.


Branching scenarios and interactions

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your font game or activity.


Last week’s Ebola Training challenge

Before you jump into this week's challenge, take a look at the creative training demos your fellow community members shared in last week's challenge:

 

Rapid Response Training: Ebola Crisis (#54): Challenge | Recap

 

Wishing you a drop-dead terrific week, E-Learning Zombies!

 

More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.

 

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Ebola Outbreak Training (Recap #54) Posted Thursday, October 16, 2014 at 3:26 PM

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Rapid Response Training: Ebola Crisis (#54): Challenge | Recap


Last week’s e-learning challenge asked course designers to create a short training interaction around the Ebola crisis. It was one of our tougher challenges and you responded with amazing examples including prevention tips, statistics, and stories of health workers battling to control the spread of Ebola.

 

New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

View Demo | Download (PowerPoint)  Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff


Jackie Van Nice

 

View Demo | Learn More… | Jackie Van Nice | @jackietrains

 


Kristin Anthony

View Demo | Learn More... | Kristin Anthony | @anthkris

 

 

Joanna Kurpiewska

View Demo | Joanna Kurpiewska | Website | @unicorntraining

 

 

Nick Russell

View Demo | Nick Russell | Benchmark Learning

 

 

Dawn Tedesco

View demo | Dawn Tedesco

 

 

Gerard Friel

View Demo | Learn More...Gerard Friel | @gerardfriel

 

 

 

Jennifer Valley

View Demo | Jennifer Valley | Website | @jvalley0714

Paul Alders

View Demo  | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

 

Tom Kuhlmann

View Demo | Tom Kuhlmann | Website | @TomKuhlmann

 

 

 

 

More about the e-learning  challenges


The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.


Post written by David Anderson


 

 

Rapid Response Training: Ebola Outbreak (Challenge #54) Posted Friday, October 10, 2014 at 5:41 PM

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Rapid Response Training: Ebola Crisis (#54): Challenge | Recap

 

A few years ago, Tom and I participated in the Global Giveback competition. Sponsored by LINGOs, the campaign paired course designers with humanitarian organizations that needed e-learning.  

 

In just over two months, volunteers created more than 40 e-learning projects to help people in the developing world.  It was really cool to be a part of something so meaningful.

 

Quick Guides and Rapid Response Training

Just last month, LINGOs partnered with DisasterReady.org to share a free, Ebola Awareness Quick Guide. It’s a short course that provides basic awareness on the Ebola outbreak. The course is also a good example of rapid response training.

Ebola Awareness Quick Guide


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to design a learning interaction around the Ebola outbreak. You don’t have to create a full course on the Ebola virus. Instead, focus on something short and quick to address one area of the virus.

 

Here are three examples to give you some ideas on how you could approach this week’s challenge.

 

Treating Ebola: By the Numbers

See what’s required to treat a single Ebola patient each day.

View the interactive graphic

Ebola Virus Disease — Current Knowledge

This interactive graphic from NEMJ.org provides information on past and present Ebola outbreaks.

View the interactive graphic

 

History of Ebola outbreaks

Interactive timeline showing the number of outbreaks between 1976 and 2014. The timeline autoplays but can also be dragged for more control.

View the interactive map and timeline

 

 

Topic ideas

Here are a few more topic ideas to get you started:

  • General information about Ebola and the outbreak.

  • How does Ebola compare with other infectious diseases?

  • Safety tips for healthcare and aid workers

  • Facts vs. Myths about Ebola

  • What are typical signs and symptoms of infection?

  • How do people become infected with the Ebola virus?

  • What do Americans (or citizens of your country) need to know?

  • 5 tips for talking to your kids about Ebola

  • How does Ebola affect the human body?

  • Ebola FAQ

  • What can I do? Can it be prevented? Is there a vaccine?

Resources

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your font game or activity.

Last week’s challenge

Take a look at the pictogram characters your fellow community members shared in last week’s e-learning challenge:

DIY E-Learning Characters: Challenge | Recap

 

 

Wishing you a response-ready week, E-Learning Heroes!



 

More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

DIY E-Learning Characters (Recap #53) Posted Thursday, October 09, 2014 at 1:15 PM

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E-Learning Characters with Pictograms: Challenge | Recap

 

Are your e-learning projects in need of a little character? Then you’ll love what the Articulate community shared in last week’s pictogram challenge.  A special thanks and welcome to Kristin Anthony, Bonita Hayes, Christina WorrellMarta Burda, and Dawn Tedesco for jumping into their first E-Learning Challenge! We’re glad you’re here!


New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.


Thanks for a pic-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

Paul Alders

View Pictograms  | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

Download (Forums) | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

Kristin Anthony

View Pictograms | Blog Post | Kristin Anthony | @anthkris

 

Bonita Hayes

View Pictograms | Bonita Hayes | @bonitahayes1

 

Dianne Hope

View Pictograms | Dianne Hope | Website | @DianneHope

 

Richard Watson

View Richard's pictograms | Richard Watson | @rwatsonID

 

Amy Doherty

Download (PowerPoint) | Amy Doherty | Website | @MSHSL_Amy

 

Jackie Van Nice

View and download Jackie's pictograms  | Jackie Van Nice | @jackietrains

 

Kimberly Bourque

View on Kim's blog | Kimberly Bourque | @Kim_Bourque

 

Bill Gates

View the pictograms | Bill Gates

 

Christina Worrell

Download (PowerPoint) | Christina Worrell

 

Cary Glenn

View Cary's ictograms | Cary Glenn | @glenncary

 

Cecilia Bernal

View on Cecilia’s blog | Cecilia Bernal | @intexpliki

 

Linda Lorenzetti

View the Interactive Pictograms | Linda Lorenzetti | @lindalor

 

Allison Nederveld

View the animated pictograms | Blog post | Allison Nederveld | @abnederveld

 

Gerard Friel

View on Gerard's blog | Gerard Friel | @gerardfriel


 

Marta Burda

Download (PowerPoint) | Marta Burda | Website

 

 

Daniel Adeboye

View on Daniel's blog | Daniel Adeboye

 

Matt Guyan

View Demo | Matt Guyan | Website | @MattGuyan

 

 

Dawn Tedesco

View demo | Dawn Tedesco

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges


The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Create Your Own E-Learning Characters with Pictograms (Challenge #53) Posted Friday, October 03, 2014 at 4:38 PM

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E-Learning Characters with Pictograms: Challenge | Recap

 

One of the more popular activities in our PowerPoint workshops is to build custom e-learning characters using basic shapes. To get an idea of the types and styles of characters, take a look at Tom’s recent post on building e-learning characters.

 

The pictogram characters are by far the most popular. Mike Taylor shared this technique in a recent post on creating simple e-learning graphics. That’s one of those posts every course designer should bookmark.


Why is this approach so popular? It’s simple and doesn’t require graphic design skills. And once you see how the basic shapes come together, you’ll never look at pictograms the same.


Think Lego® to Build Pictogram Characters

If you’ve ever played with Legos, you know how basic shapes are combined to create anything imaginable. Building pictograms is a lot working with bricks in digital format.


Let’s look at the 3-step process for assembling a generic pictogram character:

 

Easy, right? The biggest challenge for most users is knowing which shapes to use. That’s where it helps to see like an artist.


How to See Like an Artist

You’ve probably heard that artists see differently. This means they see past the final object and see the lines and shapes that make up the final object. This is a skill anyone can learn.


One way you can learn to see pictograms differently, is to pull apart finished objects. You do that by using PowerPoint’s Ungroup feature. Let’s look at another one of the free pictograms Mike shared.


Select one of the characters and ungroup it like you would regular clip art. Once it’s ungrouped, apply an outline using a contrasting color.

The outlines reveal the shapes and presents a clear view of how the shapes work together. The outline is also a way to add perspective to your characters.


Accessorize Your Characters

Character outfits and uniforms are essential to customizing the characters. You don’t need an extensive wardrobe for your characters. You just need one or two signature pieces that identify your character’s occupation and industry.

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to create your own pictogram characters for a specific industry or learning topic.


You can use the free pictogram characters as your starting point, or you can build everything on your own. The emphasis in this challenge is to customize the characters so they align with an industry.


Possible topics:

  • Medical

  • Science

  • Automotive

  • Military

  • Insurance

  • Education

  • Hospitality

  • Retail

Resources

Here are some resources to help get you started with PowerPoint’s shapes.


PowerPoint graphics

Blog posts and articles

Last week’s challenge

Before you jump into this week’s challenge, check out the interactive slider examples you and your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:

Interactive Sliders in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

Wishing you a pic-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.


Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13, Storyline, or Storyline 2, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.

Post written by David Anderson



 

Interactive Sliders in E-Learning (Recap #52) Posted Thursday, October 02, 2014 at 3:23 PM

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Interactive Sliders in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

Looking to learn more about sliders, or just curious how they can be used in e-learning? You won't want to miss the sliderrific examples shared in last week’s slider challenge.

 

A super big welcome to this week’s first-time challengers:  Frances Steinberg, Robbie Chui, Kawstov FLIP,  Joanna Kurpiewska , Katarzyna HarasymBonnie Jeansonne, Munesh Ramprashad, Pamela DavisonMatthew Mason, and Leon Geschwind. Thanks for joining the challenges and sharing your ideas. We’re glad you’re here!

 

New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.


Thanks for a slide-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

Interactive Screenshot Sliders

Learn more about a software application by dragging the slider to navigate screenshots.

View DemoPaul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

Counting Challenge

Use the slider to find the correct answer to math problems.

View DemoDownload SourcePaul Alders |  Website | @paulalders

 

3D Rotation Sliders

Rotate objects by dragging the slider.

View Demo |Charles Hamper | Website | @cfhamper

 

Stop-Motion Animation Sliders

Drag the slider to view the trotting pig motion.

View Demo |Charles Hamper | Website | @cfhamper

 

Meet Your Team

Interactive office sliders let you meet your new team and view interior and exterior views of your new home away from home.

View Demo |Robbie Chui |  Website | @RobbieChui

 

Storyline 2 Sliders and Radios

There’s a song for everyone in this interactive radio that uses sliders to change stations.

View Demo |Richard Watson | Learn More | @rwatsonID

 

 

Paper Doll Sliders

Drag the slider to try on different doll clothes and accessories.

View Demo | Jackie Van Nice | Learn More | @jackietrains

 

Sliders with Storyline & JavaScript

View Demo |Download Source |  Kawstov FLIP | Website

 

 

Slider Cookies

Customize your cookie order using sliders.

View Demo | Joanna Kurpiewska | Website

 

Slider Demos

Creative slider examples for before-after photos and menu options.

 

View Demo | Gena Hocson | Learn More

 

Superstitious Sliders

Drag the kitty to cross the avatar’s path.

View Demo | Katarzyna Harasym

 

 

iDecorator

Customize your room’s wall colors and floor styles using sliders.

View Demo | Allison NederveldLearn More | @abnederveld

 

 

Pizza, Sliders, and Storyline 2

Use sliders to choose your avatar, order drinks, and customize pizzas.

View Demo | Melissa Milloway | Learn More | @MelMilloway

 

Slider Challenge (Presenter ‘13)

Creative idea using Presenter 13’s seekbar to slide animated objects on the slide.

View Demo | Amy Doherty | Website | @MSHSL_Amy

 

 

Jean Sliders

Creative concept using image sliders to reveal objects hidden in pockets.

View Demo | Bonnie Jeansonne | Website | @_Ms_J

 

 

Slider Zoom

Control zoom levels using sliders.

View Demo | Nick Russell | Benchmark Learning

 

 

Fire Starter Slider

Drag the slider to make fire with sticks.

View Demo | Nick Russell | Benchmark Learning

 

 

Slider Gluten Meter

Drag the slider on the gluten meter to get an idea how the “gluten count” can go up during the day.

View Demo | Rebecca Fleisch Cordeiro | Website | @refco27

 

Sliders Game

Math games using multiple sliders to enter answers.

View Demo | Sol Moh

 

 

Self-Evaluation Sliders

Drag the slider to rate your comfort level at the end of each module. Review tips and guidance are provided based on the learner’s comfort level.

View Demo | Elearning Locker | Download (SL1) | Website | @elearninglocker

 

 

Lightswitch Sliders

Control the lighting and room vibe using interactive sliders.

View Demo | Linda Lorenzetti | @lindalor

 

 

Furniture Instruction Sliders

Self-paced technical instructions using sliders. Could also be used for software tutorials.

View Demo | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

 

Workplace Safety Sliders

Drag the slider to learn more about site safety equipment.

View Demo | Tom Kuhlmann | Website | @TomKuhlmann

 

 

Rating Sliders

Drag the slider to rate your interaction with another person and enter your comments in the section below.

View Demo | Frances Steinberg | Website

 

 

Website Customization Sliders

Drag the sliders to customize your websites background, fonts, and color scheme.

View Demo | Download (SL2) | Ashley Chiasson | Learn More | @amdchiasson

 

 

iPhone 6 Product Slider

Product tour using interactive sliders.

View Demo | Munesh Ramprashad | @MRamprashad

 

Global Temperatures

Drag the slider to view the effects of climate change.

View Demo | Gem Henderson | Learn More | @gemdemhen

 

 

Bert's Sliders

No one makes the slider like Bert's! Test yer slider-fryin' skills in this "well done" interaction by Dan.

View Demo | Dan Sweigert | Blog post | @elearningwdan

 

Tree Slider

Cool concept using sliders to demonstrate the steps a plant goes through from seed to fruit.

View demo | Pamela Davison | Website

 

Risk Matrix

Drag the sliders to view levels of risk.

View demo | Matthew Mason | Website | @iDesignTraining

 

 

Leon Geschwind

Drag the sliders to view the rotating canoe.

View demo | Leon Geschwind

 

Nicola Redfearn

Drag the sliders to learn how adjusting the relative proportions of pigment and binder changes the properties of paint.

View demo | Learn more |  Nicola Redfearn

 

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges


The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Using Interactive Sliders in E-Learning (Challenge #52) Posted Friday, September 26, 2014 at 2:28 PM

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Interactive Sliders in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

One of the most exciting new features in Storyline 2 is the interactive sliders. In short, sliders are really easy to create and customize.


I know there are a lot of folks out there who want to start using sliders, or are curious to know how sliders can be used in e-learning. If either one of those sounds like you, you’re going to love this week’s challenge.


Before you slide into the challenge, check out some of the slider examples and freebies community members shared over the past week:

 

Examples of Slider Interactions in Storyline 2

Michael was creating sliders in Storyline before there were sliders in Storyline. If you’re looking for advanced slider interactions, you should check out Michael’s blog and tutorials.

View example | Read more about this project | Michael Hinze

Sliding Along with Storyline 2

Customize your sliders to look any way you want. Allison shares some creative ways to use sliders for navigation, calculations, and character state changes. Be sure to check out her blog post to learn more about sliders and download the Storyline source file.

View examples | Read more about this project | Allison Nederveld

Photo Sliders

I like how Richard customized the slider with a camera icon to create this photo slider. You can learn more about this creative project and download the Storyline source file from Richard’s site.

View example | Read more about this project | Richard Watson

 

 

Video Slider Carousel

Creative example from Brian Allen on using sliders to browse video clips. You can download the Storyline file in this forum conversation.

View example | Download source | Brian Allen

 

Sliders with Story Lion

The Story Lion returns to demonstrate “slider-tastic” ways to use sliders for creative storytelling.

View the slider example

 

 

Moodometer

Another example of using sliders to change object and character states.  This type of slider is ideal for interactive surveys that evaluate how learners feel about a particular question or topic.

View example | Robbie Chui

 

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to show creative ways to use sliders in online learning. You can focus your slider on functionality or visual design.

 

Optional: Because sliders are new to all of us, please consider sharing your source files so we can learn from one another.


Here are some possible slider topics to get your creative juices sliding:

  • Navigation - How can sliders be used for navigating a slide or series of topics?

  • Data manipulation - How can you use sliders to control numeric variables for interactive scorecards, financial interactions, or mathematics learning?

  • Cause-and-effect relationships - How can you use sliders to show relationships between two or more objects or concepts?

  • Custom sliders - How can sliders be aligned visually with your course design?

Slider examples and source files

Slider tutorials

Tools

This is our first challenge based on a software feature. If you don’t already have Storyline 2, you’re welcome to use a trial version.


Do you have an idea for a slider interaction but aren’t able to use Storyline 2? You’re welcome to use PowerPoint or any other tool to share your slider examples. We really just want to see how you’re using sliders in e-learning.


Last week’s challenge

Check out the font-tastic typography games your fellow community members shared over the past week:

Font Games and Interactions for E-Learning Designers: Challenge | Recap

 

 

 


Wishing you a slideriffic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 


More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Font Games, Quizzes, and Examples (Recap #51) Posted Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 2:00 PM

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Font Games and Interactions for E-Learning Designers: Challenge | Recap

 

Terminal vs. hook? Shoulder vs. ear? Counter vs. loop? Arial vs. Helvetica?  If you’re a course designer looking to get a handle on font basics and terminology, you’ll really enjoy the font-tastic examples your fellow community members shared in our Typography Challenge.


New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.


Thanks for a font-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

 

Fontcracker Suite

View Demo |  Jackie Van Nice|  Blog Post | @jackietrains


 

Eight Milestones of Typography

View Demo |  Blog Post | Richard Watson | @bridgehillLS

 

 

Font Pairings

View DemoDownload | Tim Slade | Website | @sladetim

 

 

So You Need a Typeface

View Demo | Download | Ana Lucia Barguil | @abarguil

 

 

Font Game

View Demo | Gerard Friel | Blog Post | @gerardfriel

 

 

Fontastic

View Demo | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

 

 

Font Game

View Demo | Amy Doherty | Website | @MSHSL_Amy

 

 

Font Challenge

View Demo | Donna Carson | Website | @ElearninCanBfun

 

 

Font Challenge

View Demo | Gena Hocson | Blog Post

 

Typography

View demo | Nick Russell | Benchmark Learning

 

 

Font Game

View demo | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

Cary Glenn

View Demo | Cary Glenn | @glenncary

 

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges


The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Font Games and Interactions for E-Learning Designers (Challenge #51) Posted Friday, September 19, 2014 at 4:45 PM

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Font Games and Interactions for E-Learning Designers: Challenge | Recap

 

One of the things I enjoy most about instructional design is finding the right visual voice that reaches learner and helps them understand a new skill or concept. That’s why I found Tom’s recent post on font learning games so engaging.


Fonts are one of those elements we all use but know little about. Rather than overloading users with theory, he uses the games to engage learners of all skill levels by getting them to interact with the letters.


I liked the KernType game so much I rebuilt the game in Articulate Storyline. Here’s how it turned out:

View the Storyline version of KernType | Video tutorial | Source file

 

I was able to recreate the same options for adjusting letter spacing, viewing my result, and comparing my result to an expert solution. The only thing I couldn’t do was constrain the drag motion horizontally. That’s okay because I had still captured the overall essence of the activity using the tools I had available.


When you’re designing, you are rarely—if ever!—going to be creating a constraint-free course. The key is to master your tools and get a little help from the Articulate community.


Before we get into this week’s challenge, take a second to browse a few more games and interactions designed to help you learn more about fonts and typography.

 

Shape Type

If you’ve struggled using (or pronouncing) bezier, this is the perfect time to practice creating curves with the pen tool.

Shape Type


 

Interactive Typography

Designed and coded by Aaron Bloom & Erin Kendig, this interaction helps students learn basic type anatomy and classification.

Interactive Typography

 

Cheese or Font

If you love cheese as much as you do fonts, you’ll love this cheesy font game.

Cheese or Font

 

As course designers, you don’t need a degree in type design, but you should have a fundamental understanding of how type works. And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to create an interaction that teaches one or more basic principles of typography. This is a slightly bigger challenge than usual because it requires some content and interaction design. 

 

Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Type terminology - Create an interactive glossary to introduce learners to common vocabulary terms.

  • Anatomy of a typeface - Create an interactive guide using markers or callouts.

  • Font quiz - Ask learners to identify fonts by name. Games like Arial vs. Helvetica are a great way to learn.

  • Leading, Kerning, and Tracking - Create a learning game to help learners apply basic adjustments to line and letter spacing.

  • History of type - Create a timeline interactions to let learners explore the history of type.

  • Combining typefaces - Quiz learners on appropriate font combinations.

Tools

You can use Storyline, Studio ‘13, or PowerPoint, to design your font game or interaction.


Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your font game or activity.

Font Resources, Games, and Infographics

 

Last week’s challenge

Before you type out this week's challenge, take a look at the creative webcam videos you and your fellow community members shared in last week's flat design challenge.

 

Flat Design for E-Learning Graphics: Challenge | Recap

 

 

Wishing you a font-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!



More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Flat Design for E-Learning Graphics (Recap #50) Posted Thursday, September 18, 2014 at 12:52 PM

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Flat Design for E-Learning Graphics: Challenge | Recap

 

When it comes to creative solutions in e-learning, you can’t beat the Articulate community. This week’s challenge asked course designers to render their real-world office spaces using flat design techniques. The flat examples were anything but flat! Be sure to check out the examples, free templates, and blog posts from your fellow community members.


Special thanks to first-time challengers Zdravko Gunjevic, Eric Kinne, Elearning Locker, Lyn Lucovsky, and Matthew Swift. Thanks for sharing your ideas with the community. We’re really glad you’re here!

 

New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Thanks for a flat-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Gena Hocson

View Gena’s Flat Design

 

Paul Alders

View Demo  | Website | @paulalders

 

View Demo  | Website | @paulalders

 

Cary Glenn

View Demo | @glenncary

 

 

Nancy Woinoski

Flat design office | Website | @pinchedhead

 

Charles Hamper

View Demo | Website | @cfhamper

 

Melissa Milloway

View Demo  | Mel's Learning Lab | @MelMilloway

 

Allison Nederveld

View Demo | Download (Storyline 2) | Blog Post | @abnederveld

Ana Lucia Barguil

View Demo | @abarguil

 

Andrew Sellon

View Demo | Blog Post | @AndrewSellonNY

 

Nick Russell

View Demo | Benchmark Learning

 


Jennifer Valley

View Demo | Website | @jvalley0714

 

Gem Henderson

View Demo | Blog Post | @gemdemhen

Matt Guyan

View DemoWebsite | @MattGuyan

 

 

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Flat Design Graphics for E-Learning (Challenge #50) Posted Friday, September 12, 2014 at 2:35 PM

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Flat Design for E-Learning Graphics: Challenge | Recap

 

Whether you believe flat design is the right design for e-learning or that it’s another passing design trend, there’s a great deal of interest in DIY e-learning graphics. If you’re a course designer who wants to build custom graphics, the flat style could be a perfect fit.


Flat design emphasizes simplicity over realism. That means you don’t need mad illustration skills to create custom course elements. Using simple shapes and color palettes, you can easily create custom e-learning graphics without impacting production times.

 

Creating flat design e-learning graphics

Last week Tom shared a free learning interaction, template, and assets. After seeing the template and peeking at the graphics he built, I knew this would make a really fun e-learning challenge.

Another Free PowerPoint Template & Learning Interaction

 

If you don’t see yourself as a graphics guru, take a minute to download the StorylinePowerPoint, and editable assets Tom created. 

 

Ungroup the objects (Right-click > Ungroup) and you’ll discover just how quickly you can build graphics using the flat design style. Everything was created using basic shapes in PowerPoint and Storyline.

 

For example, a circle and square is all you need to create paper and push pins:

Take your skills to the next level by adding a rounded rectangle to your graphics repertoire:

 

Getting your graphics in shape

The minimalist style isn't just for office graphics. The design style can also be used to create e-learning characters. Using a limited color palette and basic shapes, Mike Taylor created a series of construction characters and equipment.

Ridiculously Simple Ways to Create Awesome Custom E-Learning Graphics

 

 

If you’re a one-person e-learning team with no budget and limited graphics skills, flat design is worth considering. And that’s what this week’s e-learning challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to design an office or desktop theme based on your own workplace environment. Design as many objects as you like. For variety, try adding both top and front views of your workspace.

 

Extra credit: Share a photo of your office workspace so we can compare it with your flat design template.


Tools

You can use Storyline, PowerPoint, or any other graphics program to create your flat desktop templates.


Flat design templates and resources

Learn more about using flat design in e-learning:

Here are some free flat design templates for PowerPoint and Storyline to get your creative juices flowing.


Storyline templates

PowerPoint templates

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your webcam video.


Last week’s challenge

E-Learning Challenge #50: Webcam Video in Online Learning


Before you go flat out crazy, take a look at the creative webcam videos you and your fellow community members shared in last week’s video challenge.


Wishing you a flat-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!


 


More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Webcam Video in Online Training (Recap #49) Posted Thursday, September 11, 2014 at 1:18 PM

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Webcam Video in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

If you’ve been following this week’s webcam video challenge, you know this was a stretch challenge for some designers. Whether you’re a fan of webcam video in e-learning or not, you’ll want to check out the engaging examples shared over the past week.


And a big E-Learning Heroes shoutout to first-time challenger Erik Germain. Erik’s Terminator impersonation was the perfect ice breaker for this week’s challenge. Well done, Erik!

 

New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Have a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

View Jeff's Webcam Video | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

View Jeff's Webcam Video | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

 

Erik Germain

View Erik's Webcam VideoErik Germain


 

Charles Hamper

View Charles' Webcam VideoCharles Hamper | Website @cfhamper

 

 

Allison Nederveld

View Allison's Webcam VideoAllison Nederveld | A Challenging Challenge | @abnederveld

 

Andrew Sellon

View Andrew’s Webcam Video | Andrew Sellon | Blog Post | @AndrewSellonNY

 

Daniel Adeboye

View Daniel’s Webcam Video | Daniel Adeboye | Website

 

 

Nancy Woinoski

View Nancy’s Webcam VideoNancy Woinoski | Website | @pinchedhead

 

 

 

Nick Russell

View Nick’s Webcam Video | Download: SourceNick Russell | Benchmark Learning

 

 

Paul Alders

View Paul's Webcam Video | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

Ashley Chiasson

View Ashley's Webcam Video | Ashley Chiasson | Blog post | @amdchiasson

 

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Post written by David Anderson


 

Webcam Video in E-Learning (Challenge #49) Posted Friday, September 05, 2014 at 5:05 PM

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Webcam Video in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

In a recent workshop on interactive video, some participants asked me what I thought of using webcam videos in corporate e-learning. While I haven’t done a lot with webcam video, I think it’s one of the easiest ways for designers to make existing courses more engaging.


Course introductions are a great place to start. Rather than narrate a slide of learning objectives and bullet points, try personalizing your intro with a webcam recording. Chapter and summary slides are also another way to integrate webcam videos into your courses. Once your storyboard is approved, you have the content you need to webcam one or more slides.


Though my workshop folks weren’t entirely sure video would work in their organizations, there sure was a lot of interest in it. And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to create a webcam video to introduce yourself and the types of e-learning projects you enjoy most.


This challenge is the third in our portfolio challenges. In previous challenges, you created interactive resumes and shared your e-learning portfolios. This week you'll record a video introduction and highlight some projects you've designed.


Your webcam video should include the following:

  • Full webcam video

  • Screen recording

  • Lower third

You can set up your video anyway you like. Here are some possible ideas and examples:


Option 1: Short introduction

Open with full webcam and lower thirds to include your name and website. Switch to a PowerPoint slide with some info about you and your services.

Option 2: E-learning tips

Expand on the first option by showing us what you’re currently working on. Open a project and share a peek at a project or share an e-learning tip. 


 

Option 3: Project overview

Share your e-learning portfolio and highlight one or more projects. Tell us about a project you worked on or an e-learning challenge you shared. Conclude with webcam and lower thirds.


 

Tools

You can use Articulate Replay (free) or any other video software to create and mix your webcam and screencast video.


Publishing your videos

You can embed your webcam videos in Articulate Studio or Articulate Storyline and share your project like any other course.  Another option is to publish to a video hosting service like YouTube, Vimeo, or even Flickr.


Tempshare is another option. If you want to insert your webcam video into Storyline or Studio ‘13, you can post your files to Tempshare. Note: Tempshare only keeps projects for 10 days. If you need help hosting your project, send me a message through Heroes and I’ll help you out.

 

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. 

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your webcam video.

 

Replay tutorials

Here are a few articles on creating your own webcam videos with Articulate Replay.

Video tips and resources

Here are a few helpful resources for creating webcam videos. Please feel free to share your own tips and favorite resources in the comments below.

Lighting for a Webcam | Wistia Video Production tips

 

DIY Video by Tim Slade

 

Create Flipped Classroom Content Easily with Articulate Replay

 

 

What you show is up to you. The challenge this week is to help get you started with webcam video. Have fun with it!

 


More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson

 

5 Free E-Learning Games for Articulate Storyline Posted Thursday, September 04, 2014 at 2:19 PM

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Looking for some new e-learning game ideas? Here are five more Storyline game templates shared by your fellow community members. Enjoy!

 

More E-Learning Template Recaps

 

 

What’s Your Leadership Style by Stephanie Harnett

If you’ve ever wanted to know more about leadership styles, this e-learning game might provide the answers you’re searching for. This game features six cards with each card representing a leadership style. Choose a card and answer questions to learn if your perceived style matches your actual leadership style.

 

View Demo | Download Template | Stephanie Harnett | Website | @slhice

 

 

Flash Cards by Paul Alders

This e-learning game features a creative use of variables and question banks. Shared by community member Paul Alders, this is an educational template for both kids and Storyline designers looking for advanced concepts.

View Demo | Download Source | Blog Post | @PaulAlders

 

 

Cards for Humanity by Allison Nederveld

This Storyline e-learning game is based on the popular board game, Cards Against Humanity. Shared by community member Allison Nederveld in a recent e-learning challenge, this game was created with Storyline’s convert to freeform option.

View Demo | Download Source | Blog Post | @abnederveld

 

Robot Operation by Gemma Henderson

This e-learning game was shared in a recent e-learning challenge by community member Gemma Henderson. Your objective: Remove the bot’s extra parts by dragging them to the scrap bin. Based loosely on Shocking Autopsy, this game is just as fun only without the electric shocks.

 

View Demo | Download Source | Blog Post | @gemdemhen

 

Game Center by Tom Washam

Inspired by the Xbox One, this Storyline template features customizable word search games, customizable avatars, and player colors. First shared by community member Tom Washam in this forum thread.

 

View Demo | Download Source | Website | @twasham

 


 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Customizing Quiz Feedback Prompts in Storyline Posted Thursday, September 04, 2014 at 11:17 AM

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One of the best ways to take your course designs to the next level is to stop using the defaults. Defaults include, built-in buttons, theme fonts, colors, and quiz feedback.

 

To customize the quiz feedback prompts, you need to work in Storyline’s Feedback Master. There you can customize everything from the colors to fonts to layouts of your quiz feedback layers. You can learn more about the Feedback Master in this tutorial.

 

Here’s a quick video of how it works: