E-Learning Pet Peeves Posted 5 hours ago

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David, do you like e-learning?

 

I absolutely love e-learning. I love building e-learning. I love managing e-learning. And these days, I especially love helping people build their own e-learning. E-learning is perfect.

 

Perfect? 

 

Well, there might be one or two things I don’t miss about building courses. 

 

Like what? 

 

For one thing, the interminable QA cycles. No, I really don’t miss those. I lasted two, maybe three, rounds before getting restless and wishing the project would just end. Thankfully, those projects were rare.

 

So never-ending reviews are like lima beans?

 

Exactly! So what about you? Got any e-learning pet peeves?

 

E-Learning Challenge #43: Interactive Org Charts Posted Friday, July 18, 2014 at 2:44 PM

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As course designers, you’ve likely created a course or two (or more) that introduced learners to key people in your organization. Typical content includes topics like organizational structure, position rankings, leadership bios, and general contact information. New Hire 101, right?


I’ve tracked this type of interaction for a while, but never really thought of using it for a weekly challenge until I saw a Tweet from community member Cecilia Bernal. Cecilia created some fun examples using community resources. I really liked how she reworked the templates for her own Meet the Team interactions.

 

View Meet the Team: Examples for introducing people

 

Org charts, family trees, meet the team, and who’s who are essentially the same diagram. They show organizational structure and the relationships of people and positions. After seeing the Cecilia’s interactions grouped together, I knew this would make a fun challenge.


Before we jump into this week’s challenge, take a look at some variations of org charts. Consider how a similar model could work for your own projects.

 

 

Family Trees

Family trees also use a tree structure to represent relationships. They can resemble a real tree or use simple shapes to show hierarchy.

 

View North Korea's First Family

Labeled Graphics and Markers

Photographs of teams are another way to introduce a group of people. If there are a lot of people or the people are close together, try using interactive markers to identify each person.

 

View Meet the stars of Tech City

Working with Photographs

Sometimes there are so many players, it might make sense to forego the individual callouts and give learners a big picture view. I like the way this courtroom interactive toggles the callouts on and off:

 

View Take a look around the courtroom

Learning Games

Your interactions don’t have to be click-and-reveals. Try making a game out of your org chart by asking learners to identify each role or position. Here’s an example of an interactive who’s who designed for kids:

View Who’s Who in the Executive Branch

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to design an interactive graphic to introduce an organization’s team members or key players.

You can focus on corporate teams, sports teams, or something more playful like comic book characters.

 

Interaction ideas:

 

  • Meet the Team
  • Who's Who
  • Family Tree
  • Organization Charts

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your interactive who’s who or org chart.


Resources

Here are a few resources to get you started. If you know of any good interactions that would support this week's challenge, please include them in the comments section.


Blog posts:

Templates:

Last week’s challenge

Before you introduce yourself in this week’s meet-and-greet, take a look at the smartphone videos your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge.


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you an org-chart-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Related E-Learning Challenges

Post written by David Anderson

 

Recap #42: Smartphone Video Training Posted Thursday, July 17, 2014 at 1:38 PM

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E-Learning Challenge #42: Smartphone Video Training for Course Designers

 

 

Welcome to Recap Thursday. Okay, that’s only a working title but I wanted to give you an update on the new format for the e-learning challenges.


We’ve always tried to promote your challenge demos as much as possible. Whether on Twitter, Facebook, workshops, or Tom’s blog, the best way to thank you is by promoting the projects you share each week. And I think we’ve done a really good job getting the word out. The only thing missing was a visible way to showcase your weekly examples.


Starting today, I’ll post your challenge recaps on Thursdays. This gives me a larger space to showcase your challenge demos. I’ll still post a new e-learning challenge every Friday. And yes, previous challenges are always open. To date, no one’s participated in every challenge <hint>.

 

I hope you like the new format and that it helps more people discover the great work you're doing. Thanks and see you tomorrow, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Recap #42: E-Learning Challenge #42: Smartphone Video Training for Course Designers


Preparing a Parrot ArDrone for Flight

View Michael's smartphone video training example


The only thing quicker than recording smartphone training videos is assembling a Parrot ArDrone for its first flight. Great example of what's possible using a four-year-old phone and natural light.

 

How (NOT) to Parallel Park

View Tim's smartphone video training example


There’s a right way and a wrong way to parallel park. Tim shows you the… Maybe you should just see for yourself.

 

 

 

Duvets Dos and Dont’s

View Ashley's smartphone video training example


Inserting a duvet cover sounds simple right? Evidently there’s a right and wrong way to go about it.

 

 

 

How to Make a Simple Salt Scrub

View Melissa's smartphone video training example

 

You may never purchase expensive scrubs again after watching this practical video tutorial. Thanks, Melissa!

 

 

How to Make Coffee

View Dianne's smartphone video training example

 

Making coffee is easy. Recording videos with smartphones is easy. Creating smartphone training videos has some advantages and disadvantages which you can learn about in Dianne’s detailed recap. Thanks, Dianne!

 

 

 

Making Coffee with Nespresso

View Matt's smartphone video training example


Terrific example combining smartphone video with Storyline. You’ll want to review each step to gain access to behind-the-scene photos.

 

 

 

The Proper Way to Fold a Shirt

View Daniel's smartphone video training example

 

Shirt-folding just got a whole lot easier with this helpful video. Nice use of a simple title sequence to introduce the training video. 

 

 

 

Make Your Own Smartphone Mount

View Paul's smartphone video training example

 

You don’t need to spend a lot of money on fancy camera mounts. In this video Paul shows some practical ways to build your own mount and let us know how it works.

 

 

Protect Your Lunch from Greedy Office Workers

View Stephanie's smartphone video training example

 

Whether you work in an office or your home, this video offers some proven techniques for protecting your favorite snacks.

 

 

 

How to Bust Out of Your Home Office

View Jackie's smartphone video training example

 

There’s a lot we could say and probably shouldn’t say about this one. How about if we say this is worth watching several times!

 

How to Shoot Stop Motion Animation with a Smartphone

View Charles' smartphone video training example

 

Just how much work is it to create stop motion animation? Check out the smartphone video shared by community member Charles Hamper to learn what's involved in this popular animation technique.

 

 

 

Creating Training On the Go


View Allison's smartphone video training example

 

Smartphone video is easy, but it's even easier when your cat lends a hand paw. Great use of smartphone video to demonstrate how to fold an origami box. Allison also shares some good tips and lessons learned in her blog post. 



Making Guacamole with Master Chef Morgan


View Richard's smartphone video training example

 

This smartphone video project is full of flavorful tips and tricks! It also demonstrates how well Storyline and video (and guacamole) go together! Great project, Richard! 

 

 

 

 

 

Post written by David Anderson



More about the e-learning challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.

 

E-Learning Challenge #42: Smartphone Video Training for Course Designers Posted Friday, July 11, 2014 at 12:34 AM

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In last week's challenge, we looked at a hypothetical training world where the only course design tools we had were pen and paper.

 

The samples you shared were nothing less than inspirational. When I shared your examples in my workshop yesterday, several people commented on how they imagined sketching a course could be faster than using images and text. And I totally agree.


So in the spirit of moving faster and looking at non-traditional e-learning tools, I thought it would be fun and educational to take a look at some ways course designers can use smartphones to create video courses and tutorials.


Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to record, edit, and publish a training video using your smartphone.

 

Choose a topic that allows you to record multiple videos for your project. The focus on this challenge is as much about editing as it is recording. 

 

Questions to answer

Whether or not you participate in this week's challenge, I'd love to get your feedback on the following questions. For those who participate, use the comments section or your own blog to answer the questions. This is a hot topic right now so course designers will be interested to hear about your projects.

 

  • What are some advantages and disadvantages to using smartphones for video training?
  • What types of content work well for this type of training?
  • Did you use your camera's built-in recorder or did you use a third party app? Talk about why you went with a different app.
  • What are some tips and best practices for creating smartphone training videos?
  • How long did it take you to create your video?


Possible video course ideas:

  • How to make a cup of coffee or tea

  • How to tie a shoe

  • How to give feedback to employees

  • How to parallel park

  • How to change a tire

Tools

You can use your smartphone’s built-in video camera to record and edit your videos. The emphasis is on using something portable and relatively inexpensive to create training videos.  If you use one or more custom apps, let us know what you used and how it worked for you.

 


Publishing your videos

You can embed your training videos in Articulate Studio or Articulate Storyline and share your project like any other course. Another option is to publish to a video hosting service like YouTube, Vimeo, or even Flickr. If you need help hosting your project, send me a DM through Heroes and I’ll help you out.


Resources

Here are a few articles on using smartphones to create video. After you publish and share your videos, please share some of your own tips and lessons learned.


The most important smartphone video tip you should know:

 

Vertical Video Syndrome - A PSA


Last week’s challenge

Before you shoot your masterpiece, take a look at the lo-tech, high-speed course designs your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:


  • Jeff Kortenbosch kicked off the week’s challenge by sketching a rapid response process for a fictional flood in the Netherlands. Featuring checklists for do's and dont's and a location map for affected areas, this is a well-conceived project.

  • Melissa Milloway followed with her own emergency response designs for a science lab accident. Sketches include a scenario intro, checklists, step-by-step, and prevention guide. Great job (and handwriting) Melissa!

  • Jackie Van Nice took things in a slightly different direction with her mixed-media abduction survival guide. There’s lots of ransom-iffic goodness going on in this organic and highly tactile “course” design.

  • Kimberly Bourque shared her analog-based hurricane survival guide featuring a locator map, contact numbers, and evacuation decision map. Awesome, Kimberly!

  • Lance Treloar shared a low-tech guide to surviving an alien invasion. It could happen, you know? I really like the way Lance used contrasting line weights to visually group the steps.

  • Richard Watson buzzed through this challenge with a colorful guide to surviving a killer bee invasion featuring FAQs, maps, how-tos, prevention, and removal steps, this is a “sweet” project. Richard took things up a notch by creating an interactive version of his project that caused even more buzz.

  • Daniel Adeboye sketched a colorful step-by-step guide for coping with test anxiety. Simple and elegant solution featuring background information, do's and dont's, recovery and prevention tips. Nicely done, Daniel!

  • Dianne Hope shared a three-step bush fire safety guide that features how-tos for preparing, acting, and surviving. Thanks, Dianne!

  • Allison Nederveld used Sharpies and watercolors to guide users through a hurricane disaster that features shelter news, FAQs and reminders, evacuation routes, and a safety checklist for dos and don’ts. Awesome project, Allison!

  • Hazel Brewer joined her first challenge (Yay!) with a highly relevant zombie survival guide. Featuring branching sticky notes and safety maps, this is another creative example of lo-fi course designs. Thanks for sharing, Hazel!

  • Dan Sweigert sketched a Survivorman-themed survival guide for surviving a cruise ship disaster. Featuring bold graphics and tips for shelter, food, and safety, these sketches are a great solution to pen and paper course design. Thanks, Dan!

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a videotastic week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

 

E-Learning Challenge #41: Low-Tech, High-Speed Course Design Posted Friday, July 04, 2014 at 5:55 PM

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Shortly after the dust storms rolled in last night, most of Phoenix lost power for several hours. Power outages are rare in Phoenix, but they can be scary for cats, dogs, and 5-yr olds. To keep our kid’s mind focused on happy thoughts, we gathered around our candle-lit table and made flower fairies.

 

Back to the basics

While we worked by candlelight, I remembered a story I’d read about the 2011 Japan earthquake and how a town’s newspaper used pen and paper to manually print news of the disaster, shelter information, and general support efforts.

 

“For six consecutive days after the twin disasters, reporters used flashlights and marker pens to write their stories on poster-size paper and posted the ‘newspapers’ at the entrances of relief centers around the city. Six staff members collected stories, while three spent an hour and a half each day writing the newspapers by hand.” Newseum


View the video story at Newseum

 

One reason I think I like this story so much is that it’s a great reminder that technology is only part of the answer. It also highlights the speed at which designers can move when they aren’t focused on technology or any single solution.

 

Power’s out? Pen and paper are in. Back to work everyone!

 

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to create an emergency-response course using pen and paper.


Select a news story or training course that focuses on a disaster or emergency event and create a 3-5 slide course to help learners navigate the event. Because you’re creating everything by hand, you’ll really need to focus on the basics.

 

Consider adding one or more of the following elements:

  • Information - What happened and what do your learners need to know?

  • Checklists - Can you provide steps or procedures for your learners to follow?

  • Resources - Are there any additional resources available to learners?

Note: This challenge is not about prototyping. This one’s all about designing an analog course using basic drawing tools. 

 

Tools

You can use crayons, markers, pencils, or any non-digital drawing tools to create your mini-course. You can digitize your handwritten slides any way you like.


Suggested ways to share your images:


Last week’s challenge

Before you pencil in some time for this week’s challenge, take a look at the instructional design quizzes your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a poster-riffic week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.



 

Recap #39: E-Learning Interviews with the Articulate Community Posted Saturday, June 28, 2014 at 3:27 AM

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Last week we asked industry experts (that’s you!) to share their opinions about everything from designing and evaluating e-learning to mobile development to the future of e-learning. 

 

As usual, you guys rocked this challenge. I seriously think this is my favorite challenge. I really appreciate all the time you put into recording your interviews. Thank you.

 

For those who missed the podcast challenge, you’ll find the full interviews below. Hope you enjoy listening to the podcasts, and here’s reminding you that you that the e-learning challenges are always open. If you feel like recording your own interview, we’ll update both the recap post and this highlights post to feature your podcast.

 

 

 

Tim Slade

Profile: Tim Slade

Website: Tim Slade

Twitter: @sladetim

 

 

Allison Nederveld

Profile: Allison Nederveld

Website: Allison B. Nederveld

Twitter: @abnederveld

 

 

Ashley Chiasson

Profile: Ashley Chiasson

Website: Ashley Chiasson

Twitter: @amdchiasson

 

 

Nick Russell

Profile: Nick Russell

Website: Benchmark Learning

 

 

 

Dan Sweigert

Profile: Dan Sweigert

Website: E-Learning With Dan

Twitter: @elearningwdan

 

 

 

 

Nicholas Sargent

Profile: Nicholas Sargent

Website: Healthy Connections Medicaid

 

 


Dana Dutiel

Profile: Dana Dutiel

 

 

 

Jackie Van Nice

Profile: Jackie Van Nice

Website: Jackie Van Nice

Twitter: @JackieTrains

 

 

 

 

Nancy Woinoski

Profile: Nancy Woinoski

Website: Pinched Head

Twitter: @pinchedhead

 

 

 

Richard Watson

Profile: Richard Watson

Website: Bridgehill Learning

Twitter: @bridgehillLS

 

 

 

Rebecca Fleisch Cordeiro

Profile: Rebecca Fleisch Cordeiro

Website: eLearning eLements

Twitter: @refco27

 

 

 

 

Daniel Adeboye

Profile: Daniel Adeboye

Website: All4Krist

 

 

 

Daniel Brigham

Profile: Daniel Brigham

Website: Brigham Communications

Twitter: @danielbrigham

 

 

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

Profile: Jeff Kortenbosch

Website: Serious Learning

Twitter: @elearningjeff

 

 

 

Paul Alders

Profile: Paul Alders

Website: Eyespirations

Twitter: @PaulAlders

 

 

E-Learning Challenge #40: Instructional Design Quizzes Posted Friday, June 27, 2014 at 1:54 PM

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Formative vs. summative? Pedagogy vs. andragogy? Formal vs. informal? Flipped classrooms? Bloom vs. Gagne vs. Werner? Huh?!?

 

When you’re first getting started in e-learning, it’s easy to be confused — and daunted — by the terms floating around the online training industry. It’s hard to sift through the theories, styles, and expert opinions to get to the heart of what you really need to know.


In a recent e-learning challenge, you guys shared some amazing instructional design activities. Topics included everything from general models, theories, and concepts. Wouldn’t it be nice to know if your fellow community members learned anything from the activities you designed? Sounds like a great challenge!

 

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to create a quiz that tests learners on an instructional design principle, model, researcher, or theorist.


You can create any type of quiz you like. Go with the timeless multiple choice or true-false questions, or create something more playful using a custom quiz. You can make the quiz as simple or challenging as you like… Just keep it fair and practical.


Keep in mind the objective is to reinforce basic instructional design principles using interactive quizzes. It’s more about the content this week.

 

Ideas for quizzes

  • Instructional design myths - What are some common myths in our industry? Present learners with a myth or fact and ask them to identify whether it’s fact or fiction.

  • Terms and definitions - These are always easy to create and there’s no shortage of instructional design terms.

  • Instructional methods - Present your learners with a scenario and challenge them to select the appropriate instructional methods.

  • ADDIE - Create your quiz around ADDIE or a specific phase

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your instructional design quiz.

 

Resources


Here are some resources you can use for your quiz. If you have a favorite resource that you’d like to share, please feel free to share in the comments section.

 

Instructional design

Creating quizzes

Examples of quizzes


Last week’s challenge

Before you put your skills to the test in this week’s challenge, take a look at the e-learning interviews your fellow community members recorded in last week’s podcast challenge:

 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.

 

Wishing you a quiztastic week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Related E-Learning Challenges

 

E-Learning Challenge #39: Podcasts for Learning Posted Friday, June 20, 2014 at 6:27 PM

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I've always been a big fan of audio podcasts for everything from learning to entertainment. One of my favorite audio projects comes from StoryCorps. Specializing in capturing oral history, StoryCorps travels around the country setting up MobileBoothsrecording studios housed in Airstream trailers.

 

 

They invite pairs of people to interview each other for 40 minutes about the most important moments in their lives. StoryCorps keeps a copy and provides participants a CD copy of the interview. They even offer a free Do-It-Yourself Instruction Guide for capturing and recording your own interviews.

 

 

While their focus is on storytelling and oral history, there’s plenty of interviewing techniques course designers can apply to their own training projects.


So I thought it’d be interesting in our challenge this week to switch gears from a visual focus, and instead play with our audio sense to design a podcast.


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to record your answers to the following 10 interview questions:


E-Learning Podcast Interview Questions:

  1. Tell us a little about yourself and the types of e-learning projects you most enjoy.

  2. How did you become an e-learning or instructional designer?

  3. What are the essentials of good e-learning design?

  4. Tell me about your most successful e-learning project.

  5. What are the most important criteria in evaluating e-learning?

  6. What are some common mistakes new course designers make and how can they avoid them?

  7. How is designing mobile learning different than designing for the desktop?

  8. How do you evaluate whether your course was effective?

  9. How do you keep up your skills and stay current in the industry?

  10. What is the future of e-learning?

Save each audio clip as its own file. Use a naming convention that makes it easy to identify each audio file to the corresponding question. You can use numbers (1-10) or any format that works best for you.

 

In the comments section or on your own blog, link to each of your 10 audio clips. I’ll compile each of your questions into an interactive audio project.

 


 

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, Audacity, or any other audio recording program to record your podcast.


Last week’s challenge

Before you sound off in this week’s challenge, check out the amazing game templates your fellow community members shared in last week’s template challenge:


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a safe and sound week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

 

E-Learning Challenge #38: Steal This E-Learning Template Posted Friday, June 13, 2014 at 6:07 PM

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E-learning Conundrum: Modifying Templates

You’ve Googled, Bing’d, and even asked Jeeves, but still haven’t found the right template for your project. It’s not like there aren’t enough options.


If only this game weren’t a western theme. This one might work if the menu were on the left. I like this one but the colors aren’t in season. Pfft, this one is too outdated for my learners. And who creates pirate training?

 

We hear this all the time and it’s totally valid. I mean, it’s not like you open a template and press the Convert Template to Match My Course Design button and voilà, your template is ready to go.


Basic customizations like changing the template’s colors and swapping placeholder graphics are easy. For most course designers, the real challenge is seeing the template for more than its intended purpose.


A Quest for the Perfect E-Learning Template

A few weeks ago, community member Jackie Van Nice shared a really fun game template for Storyline. The template was based on a custom project Jackie created for an earlier e-learning challenge


What’s really helpful is to compare the before-after (or is it after-before?) examples:

 


 

You can read all about both projects on Jackie’s blog. She even recorded some video tutorials to help you get started with the template.

 

Seeing both the template and custom versions reminded me of the importance of leveraging existing course assets for one's own e-learning projects. And that's what this week's challenge is all about!


Challenge of the Week

This week your challenge is to repurpose the Create Your Own Quest template into something of your own.


“Wait! The Quest template is only available in Storyline so I guess I can’t participate this week. Thanks a lot, David.”


You can totally participate! In fact, not having the same software is exactly the type of constraint this challenge is all about. The objective here is to leverage the essence of the template into something for your own needs.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to create your template makeover.


Resources

Here are some articles that will help you think through your template design. If you get stuck on ideas, just ask in the comments below and we’ll share some more ideas.


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a customized week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

11 Free Tabbed Navigation Templates for Articulate Storyline Posted Thursday, June 12, 2014 at 7:50 PM

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Inspired by folder and file cabinet metaphors, tabs interactions are a great way to present related content on a single slide. This makes it easy for learners to explore the material without having to branch to new slides for each piece of content.

 

As course designers, you’ll want a range of  tab designs in your template library. Below you’ll find some of the most popular Storyline templates your fellow community members have shared.

 

And if you’d like to learn more about building your own tabs interactions in Storyline, check out this video workshop.

 

Web Style Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction

 

Here's a simple yet creative tabbed interaction shared by Phil Mayor in this community thread. The interaction features colorful tabs and customizable Twitter and email options.Learn more about how to customize the template in this blog post.

 

 

5-Step Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction

 

Here's an elegant tabs interaction shared by Super Hero Kevin Thorn in this weekly challenge. The tabs interaction features animated tabs an an easy-to-modify layout.


 

iPhone Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction


This tabs timeline interaction was shared by community member Montse Anderson. This template features image-based tabs and offers a creative way to present timeline-based topics.


Tabz

View the tabs interaction

 

This animated tabs interaction features a creative use of entrance and exit animations. Created by community member Przemysław Hubisz, this tabs template is fully editable so you can use in your own e-learning projects.



Tabs Challenge

View the tabs interaction

 

In this creative example, community Matt Guyan shares a humorous take on types of tabs interactions.


Animated Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction

 

A fast-paced, animated tabs interaction shared by community member Andrzej Rudnik in the tabs e-learning challenge.


 


Puzzle Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction

 

This puzzle-themed tabs interaction was shared by community member Sanjib Nanda.


4-Step Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction

 

Process interaction template shared by community member Anand Timothy. The template is fully editable so you can customize for your own e-learning projects.

 

 

Evaluation Tabs Interaction

View the tabs interaction

 

Here's a fun, unique tabs interaction that was shared by Storyline user Montse Anderson in this forum thread. The graphical tabs in this interaction allow learners to explore evaluation data on any groovy character they choose.


 

Composition Book Tabs

View the tabs interaction

 

Here’s a fun tabs interaction designed around the popular overhead desktop theme.


Tabs Challenge

View the tabs interaction

 

In this creative example, community Matt Guyan shares a humorous take on types of tabs interactions.


Post written by David Anderson

 

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More Free E-Learning Templates

 

E-Learning Challenge Recap: 37 Weeks of E-Learning Demos, Templates, and Inspiration Posted Friday, June 06, 2014 at 2:44 PM

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I don’t know about you, but I get such a kick out of seeing what you guys come up with each week. I try to imagine what kind of e-learning pro I’d be if I had a community of experts like you when I first started in this industry.


No challenge this week. Instead, use the time to review the amazing demos you and your fellow community members shared over the past three months. You can also use the time to catch up on a challenge or two you missed.

 

About the challenges

Miss a challenge?

Challenges are always open—there's never a deadline to submit an idea. If you missed a challenge, just add your demo to the comments and we'll update the weekly recap and the quarterly recap to include your samples. The best way we know how to thank you for sharing is by promoting what you do.

 

Got an idea for a challenge?

I'm always taking ideas for future challenges. I think our editorial calendar is filled through June, but I can always move things around for the right challenge. If you have an idea for a challenge, I definitely want to hear it.


Looking for previous challenges?

You can find the first 12 challenges in this recap post and the next 13 challenges in this recap post.


Here are summaries and links to the latest 12 weekly challenges:


Spelling Bees and Interactive Vocabulary Quizzes


Interactive Step Graphics in Online Training



What’s In Your Course Design Toolkit?



Instructional Design Learning Activities



Fix Your E-Learning Mistakes



Death, Taxes, and E-Learning Mistakes



Creative Resume Templates for E-Learning Portfolios




What Do E-Learning Designers Really Do?



Summary and Resource Slides in Online Courses



Top 10 Things Learners Need to Know About Storyline




Visual Storytelling with Photo Collages




Interactive Screenshots for Online Training


Post written by David Anderson

 

12 Free E-Learning Games for Articulate Storyline Posted Tuesday, June 03, 2014 at 5:43 PM

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It seems like every time you turn around, someone in the Articulate community is giving away a cool new template. If you didn’t have a chance to keep up with all the free e-learning game templates shared over the past year, no worries!

 

Here’s a recap of 12  e-learning games your fellow community members shared.

 

Hugs ‘n’ Kisses

Here’s a creative version of everyone’s favorite childhood game. Shared in the community by Kevin Thorn on Valentine’s Day, this e-learning game is a great opportunity to learn advanced Storyline techniques.


 

Matching Game


Here’s a creative matching game template created by Articulate community member Przemysław Hubisz for a recent e-learning challenge.


 

Memory Game


Add memories to your bird book in this memory game interaction shared by Articulate Super Hero Stephanie Harnett in thisforum thread. Stephanie also recorded a quick Screenr to help you learn more about using this game template.


 

Hangman Game


Simple and fun Hangman game shared by Articulate community member Jade Kelsall in this forum discussion.


 

Pirate Wars


Arrr! Here’s a fun e-learning quiz template featuring a creative pirate theme. Shared by Rıdvan Saglam in this community thread, this game is easily updated so you can use with your own projects.



Trivia Game


Fast-paced trivia game template for Articulate Storyline. Designed by Tim Slade, this e-learning template features editable graphics and colors so you can use in your own projects.


 

Connect the Dots


Simple connect the dots game built in Storyline. The game features options for enabling and disabling the number guides.


 

Bananas Game



Variables, slide layers, and triggers power this amusing math game, which includes just three slides: an introduction, bank of 12 questions, and a result slide. Answer a randomly presented question correctly to bump the monkey up the tree. Get five right and the monkey eats breakfast. Who knew variables could be so fun?

 

 

 

Farkle Game


Community member Matthew Kliewer shared this game in the forums back in 2012 and it’s still one of my favorites. While this game is not fully built out, it features advanced use of triggers and variables.


 

Bingo Game


Here’s a fun Bingo game template shared by Articulate community member Montse Anderson. The game features customizable bingo cards so you can use in your own e-learning projects.


Christmas Game


Here's a fun e-learning game shared by Articulate community member Paul Alders. Based on the popular game Mind Master, this Storyline game uses advanced variables, slide layers, and triggers.


 

Tic Tac Match

 

 

Here’s a fun version of Tic Tac Toe created by Articulate community member John U in this forum thread.


Post written by David Anderson

 

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Related E-Learning Templates

 

E-Learning Challenge #37: Spelling Bees and Interactive Vocabulary Quizzes Posted Friday, May 30, 2014 at 2:49 PM

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The 2014 National Spelling Bee competition kicked off this week. Spellers from around the world will compete for the crown in one of America’s most enduring celebrations of academic excellence.


While the children are buzzing about spelling words most of us can’t pronounce, I thought it would be fun to pull together a few interactive audio packages that could inspire some practical applications for course designers. Knowing most of you have an affinity for the written word, I thought this would also make a great e-learning challenge.


Before we jump into this week’s challenge, take a look at some innovative spelling projects to get a sense of what’s possible.

 

National Spelling Bee: Public Sample

Test your spelling skills to see if you could qualify for the Semifinals. Featuring audio pronunciations and text entry fields, this format is great for practicing your spelling.

 

Are you a word whiz? Test your spelling skills!

 

 

USA Today: Could you win the National Spelling Bee?

This quiz includes audio pronunciations and options for visitors to learn more about the definition and origin of the word and to hear the word used in a sentence.

 

Notice any similarities to the previous example? Most of the same options are provided but rather than pushing everything on the slide, the USA Today interactive used a pull approach giving visitors more control over their experience.

Click to test your skills!

 

 

Annenberg Learner: Spelling Bee

This audio quiz uses a story-based approach to spelling bees. Visitors listen to a story and then spell the words from each story.

 

Clicking the text entry fields pauses the story so visitors can repeat the words. Very clever interaction. I’m hoping several of you take on this model for your challenge demo.

View the Spelling Bee Quiz

 

 

 

The Guardian: National Spelling Bee

This spelling quiz doesn’t use audio—it’s entirely text based. It’s a good option for course designers who face multimedia constraints where audio isn’t an option.

How would you fare in the National Spelling Bee?

 

 

 

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to build an interactive vocabulary quiz. You can focus your interaction on spelling, pronunciation, comprehension, or anything else.

 

Look for interaction opportunities to capture learner responses. You’ve seen how text entry and multiple choice interactions can work. What else would work?

 

Need vocabulary content ideas?

 

Last week’s challenge

To avoid an interactive dry spell, check out the interactive steps your fellow community members took in last week’s e-learning challenge:



More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a spellbound week, E-Learning Heroes!

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

10 Free E-Learning Games for Articulate Storyline Posted Tuesday, May 27, 2014 at 12:43 PM

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A sure-fire way to hone your Articulate Storyline skills is to deconstruct projects built by other course designers. Thankfully, there’s no shortage of free templates in the Articulate community that will help you crank out sharp, engaging projects in a jiffy.


Here are 10 free e-learning game templates your fellow community members shared over the past year.

 

Hub and Spoke

Learn the basics of telemedicine in this challenge game by Keith Freeman. This e-learning game gives learners the option to choose their own avatar, starting skill level, and reclaim links for retaking missed questions.


Create Your Own Quest

Take your learners on a learning quest in this travel-themed game by Jackie Van Nice. Derived from Jackie’s Oktoberfest Quest game, this template features a game-board design, animated progress meters, and fully customizable objects.


 

Quizzify Game

Quizzing template based on a popular game show quiz. Shared by Jacinta Penn, this template features a grid-based layout that includes weighted questions in three categories. This quiz is trackable in your LMS.


Find the Big Five Matching Game

Test your memory in this safari-themed matching game by Bastiaan Timmer. The template is fully editable so you can customize it for your own projects.


Question Challenge

Concept game idea shared by Przemysław Hubisz in a recent e-learning challengethis game template features keyboard navigation and custom quiz questions.  While this template isn’t fully developed, it does provide users a peek at some advanced options in Storyline.


Penalty Shootout Game

I love how the Articulate community shares and builds upon great ideas. The football game was first shared by Darrell G in the forums. Later, Rıdvan Saglam leveraged Darrel G’s idea to build a his own version.

 



Just Joking

Simple click-and-reveal game based on the popular trivia series by National Geographic. The template is fully editable and leverages Storyline’s states and slide layers for questions and feedback.

 

Crossword Puzzle Game

Here’s a fun and simple crossword puzzle designed for children. Shared by Nick Russell, this template is fully editable and features an option for audio hints.

 

Visual Logic

Test your lateral thinking in this brain teaser game by Montse Anderson in this community discussion. The discussion is a great example of the power of community feedback in product development.


 

Gunslinger

Test your reflexes in this fast moving, first-person bottle shooter game designed by Articulate Super Hero Phil Mayor. This template is editable so you can customize everything using your own graphics and objects.


 

Post written by David Anderson

 

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More Free E-Learning Templates for Articulate Storyline

 

E-Learning Challenge #36: Interactive Step Graphics in Online Training Posted Friday, May 23, 2014 at 5:06 PM

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Step graphics are interactive explanations that make it easy for learners to sequentially walk through a process, workflow, procedure, or related items. They can be used for all types of learning interactions, from procedural training to interactive storytelling.

 


Navigating Step Graphics

Using numeric pagination, step graphics are great for chunking complex information into step-by-step explanations that visually organize each step of a process.

 

One of my favorite step graphic examples comes from the Washington Post.

Step Graphic: Why short guys can dunk

 

Simple Pagination

Step graphics can use simple previous and next buttons to move learners through each step like this stepper from Jornal de Notícias:

Step Graphic: Reconstructing the Death of Berto Maluco


Timeline Pagination

Timelines can also be used to step learners through a series of sequential events like this stepper from El País:

Step Graphic: Plane crash in the Atlantic

 

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to build a step graphic to tell a story or communicate a process. Choose any topic you like and see if you can find creative ways to present the step graphic navigation.

 

Examples

Here are some more examples of step graphics.

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to create your interactive step graphic.


Last week’s challenge

Before you step up to week’s challenge, take a look at what your fellow community members keep in their e-learning toolkits:


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a step-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson


______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.