Flat Design for E-Learning Graphics (Recap #50) Posted 5 hours ago

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Flat Design for E-Learning Graphics: Challenge | Recap

 

When it comes to creative solutions in e-learning, you can’t beat the Articulate community. This week’s challenge asked course designers to render their real-world office spaces using flat design techniques. The flat examples were anything but flat! Be sure to check out the examples, free templates, and blog posts from your fellow community members.


Special thanks to first-time challengers Zdravko Gunjevic, Eric Kinne, Elearning Locker, Lyn Lucovsky, and Matthew Swift. Thanks for sharing your ideas with the community. We’re really glad you’re here!

 

New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Thanks for a flat-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Gena Hocson

View Gena’s Flat Design

 

Paul Alders

View Demo  | Website | @paulalders

 

Cary Glenn

View Demo | @glenncary

 

 

Nancy Woinoski

Flat design office | Website | @pinchedhead

 

Charles Hamper

View Demo | Website | @cfhamper

 

Melissa Milloway

View Demo  | Mel's Learning Lab | @MelMilloway

 

Allison Nederveld

View Demo | Download (Storyline 2) | Blog Post | @abnederveld

Ana Lucia Barguil

View Demo | @abarguil

 

Andrew Sellon

View Demo | Blog Post | @AndrewSellonNY

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Flat Design Graphics for E-Learning (Challenge #50) Posted Friday, September 12, 2014 at 2:35 PM

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Whether you believe flat design is the right design for e-learning or that it’s another passing design trend, there’s a great deal of interest in DIY e-learning graphics. If you’re a course designer who wants to build custom graphics, the flat style could be a perfect fit.


Flat design emphasizes simplicity over realism. That means you don’t need mad illustration skills to create custom course elements. Using simple shapes and color palettes, you can easily create custom e-learning graphics without impacting production times.

 

Creating flat design e-learning graphics

Last week Tom shared a free learning interaction, template, and assets. After seeing the template and peeking at the graphics he built, I knew this would make a really fun e-learning challenge.

Another Free PowerPoint Template & Learning Interaction

 

If you don’t see yourself as a graphics guru, take a minute to download the StorylinePowerPoint, and editable assets Tom created. 

 

Ungroup the objects (Right-click > Ungroup) and you’ll discover just how quickly you can build graphics using the flat design style. Everything was created using basic shapes in PowerPoint and Storyline.

 

For example, a circle and square is all you need to create paper and push pins:

Take your skills to the next level by adding a rounded rectangle to your graphics repertoire:

 

Getting your graphics in shape

The minimalist style isn't just for office graphics. The design style can also be used to create e-learning characters. Using a limited color palette and basic shapes, Mike Taylor created a series of construction characters and equipment.

Ridiculously Simple Ways to Create Awesome Custom E-Learning Graphics

 

 

If you’re a one-person e-learning team with no budget and limited graphics skills, flat design is worth considering. And that’s what this week’s e-learning challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to design an office or desktop theme based on your own workplace environment. Design as many objects as you like. For variety, try adding both top and front views of your workspace.

 

Extra credit: Share a photo of your office workspace so we can compare it with your flat design template.


Tools

You can use Storyline, PowerPoint, or any other graphics program to create your flat desktop templates.


Flat design templates and resources

Learn more about using flat design in e-learning:

Here are some free flat design templates for PowerPoint and Storyline to get your creative juices flowing.


Storyline templates

PowerPoint templates

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your webcam video.


Last week’s challenge

E-Learning Challenge #50: Webcam Video in Online Learning


Before you go flat out crazy, take a look at the creative webcam videos you and your fellow community members shared in last week’s video challenge.


Wishing you a flat-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!


 


More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Webcam Video in Online Training (Recap #49) Posted Thursday, September 11, 2014 at 1:18 PM

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Webcam Video in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

If you’ve been following this week’s webcam video challenge, you know this was a stretch challenge for some designers. Whether you’re a fan of webcam video in e-learning or not, you’ll want to check out the engaging examples shared over the past week.


And a big E-Learning Heroes shoutout to first-time challenger Erik Germain. Erik’s Terminator impersonation was the perfect ice breaker for this week’s challenge. Well done, Erik!

 

New to the e-learning challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Have a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

View Jeff's Webcam Video | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

View Jeff's Webcam Video | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

 

Erik Germain

View Erik's Webcam VideoErik Germain


 

Charles Hamper

View Charles' Webcam VideoCharles Hamper | Website @cfhamper

 

 

Allison Nederveld

View Allison's Webcam VideoAllison Nederveld | A Challenging Challenge | @abnederveld

 

Andrew Sellon

View Andrew’s Webcam Video | Andrew Sellon | Blog Post | @AndrewSellonNY

 

Daniel Adeboye

View Daniel’s Webcam Video | Daniel Adeboye | Website

 

 

Nancy Woinoski

View Nancy’s Webcam VideoNancy Woinoski | Website | @pinchedhead

 

 

 

Nick Russell

View Nick’s Webcam Video | Download: SourceNick Russell | Benchmark Learning

 

 

Paul Alders

View Paul's Webcam Video | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

Ashley Chiasson

View Ashley's Webcam Video | Ashley Chiasson | Blog post | @amdchiasson

 

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Post written by David Anderson


 

Webcam Video in E-Learning (Challenge #49) Posted Friday, September 05, 2014 at 5:05 PM

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Webcam Video in E-Learning: Challenge | Recap

 

In a recent workshop on interactive video, some participants asked me what I thought of using webcam videos in corporate e-learning. While I haven’t done a lot with webcam video, I think it’s one of the easiest ways for designers to make existing courses more engaging.


Course introductions are a great place to start. Rather than narrate a slide of learning objectives and bullet points, try personalizing your intro with a webcam recording. Chapter and summary slides are also another way to integrate webcam videos into your courses. Once your storyboard is approved, you have the content you need to webcam one or more slides.


Though my workshop folks weren’t entirely sure video would work in their organizations, there sure was a lot of interest in it. And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to create a webcam video to introduce yourself and the types of e-learning projects you enjoy most.


This challenge is the third in our portfolio challenges. In previous challenges, you created interactive resumes and shared your e-learning portfolios. This week you'll record a video introduction and highlight some projects you've designed.


Your webcam video should include the following:

  • Full webcam video

  • Screen recording

  • Lower third

You can set up your video anyway you like. Here are some possible ideas and examples:


Option 1: Short introduction

Open with full webcam and lower thirds to include your name and website. Switch to a PowerPoint slide with some info about you and your services.

Option 2: E-learning tips

Expand on the first option by showing us what you’re currently working on. Open a project and share a peek at a project or share an e-learning tip. 


 

Option 3: Project overview

Share your e-learning portfolio and highlight one or more projects. Tell us about a project you worked on or an e-learning challenge you shared. Conclude with webcam and lower thirds.


 

Tools

You can use Articulate Replay (free) or any other video software to create and mix your webcam and screencast video.


Publishing your videos

You can embed your webcam videos in Articulate Studio or Articulate Storyline and share your project like any other course.  Another option is to publish to a video hosting service like YouTube, Vimeo, or even Flickr.


Tempshare is another option. If you want to insert your webcam video into Storyline or Studio ‘13, you can post your files to Tempshare. Note: Tempshare only keeps projects for 10 days. If you need help hosting your project, send me a message through Heroes and I’ll help you out.

 

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. 

  • Twitter: If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • Facebook: Reply to this Facebook post with a link to your webcam video.

 

Replay tutorials

Here are a few articles on creating your own webcam videos with Articulate Replay.

Video tips and resources

Here are a few helpful resources for creating webcam videos. Please feel free to share your own tips and favorite resources in the comments below.

Lighting for a Webcam | Wistia Video Production tips

 

DIY Video by Tim Slade

 

Create Flipped Classroom Content Easily with Articulate Replay

 

 

What you show is up to you. The challenge this week is to help get you started with webcam video. Have fun with it!

 


More about the e-learning  challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson

 

5 Free E-Learning Games for Articulate Storyline Posted Thursday, September 04, 2014 at 2:19 PM

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Looking for some new e-learning game ideas? Here are five more Storyline game templates shared by your fellow community members. Enjoy!

 

More E-Learning Template Recaps

 

 

What’s Your Leadership Style by Stephanie Harnett

If you’ve ever wanted to know more about leadership styles, this e-learning game might provide the answers you’re searching for. This game features six cards with each card representing a leadership style. Choose a card and answer questions to learn if your perceived style matches your actual leadership style.

 

View Demo | Download Template | Stephanie Harnett | Website | @slhice

 

 

Flash Cards by Paul Alders

This e-learning game features a creative use of variables and question banks. Shared by community member Paul Alders, this is an educational template for both kids and Storyline designers looking for advanced concepts.

View Demo | Download Source | Blog Post | @PaulAlders

 

 

Cards for Humanity by Allison Nederveld

This Storyline e-learning game is based on the popular board game, Cards Against Humanity. Shared by community member Allison Nederveld in a recent e-learning challenge, this game was created with Storyline’s convert to freeform option.

View Demo | Download Source | Blog Post | @abnederveld

 

Robot Operation by Gemma Henderson

This e-learning game was shared in a recent e-learning challenge by community member Gemma Henderson. Your objective: Remove the bot’s extra parts by dragging them to the scrap bin. Based loosely on Shocking Autopsy, this game is just as fun only without the electric shocks.

 

View Demo | Download Source | Blog Post | @gemdemhen

 

Game Center by Tom Washam

Inspired by the Xbox One, this Storyline template features customizable word search games, customizable avatars, and player colors. First shared by community member Tom Washam in this forum thread.

 

View Demo | Download Source | Website | @twasham

 


 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Customizing Quiz Feedback Prompts in Storyline Posted Thursday, September 04, 2014 at 11:17 AM

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One of the best ways to take your course designs to the next level is to stop using the defaults. Defaults include, built-in buttons, theme fonts, colors, and quiz feedback.

 

To customize the quiz feedback prompts, you need to work in Storyline’s Feedback Master. There you can customize everything from the colors to fonts to layouts of your quiz feedback layers. You can learn more about the Feedback Master in this tutorial.

 

Here’s a quick video of how it works:



 

E-Learning Heroes Roadshow: Denver! Posted Tuesday, September 02, 2014 at 11:33 AM

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Register for the Denver Workshop (September 10-11)

 

We get it. It takes more than great software to create engaging courses. That’s why we’re bringing the best of the world’s #1 e-learning community to Denver for two days of practical tips, inspirational examples, free downloads, and expert advice. 

 

This will be a fun, friendly extension of our E-Learning Heroes community and we’re inviting you to bring your laptop to get some hands on experience working along with and learning from Tom Kuhlmann, Dave Anderson, and as your fellow community Articulate members. 

 

Who should attend?

You don’t have to be an Articulate customer to benefit from this workshop which has value for any of the following:

  • Subject matter experts who build rapid elearning courses

  • Trainers transitioning to elearning

  • Instructional designers

  • Elearning designers & developers

Why you should attend?

  • Learn how to save time and money with more efficient development

  • Take your courses past the standard click-and-read model

  • Make your courses look like elearning courses & not bullet-point slides

  • Create interactive & engaging courses using reusable models

  • Hundreds of post-conference resources that include tutorials, getting-started documentation, and templates

Day 1 (Sept 10): General Course Design

  • Build Reusable Interactive Models | Tom Kuhlmann, VP, Community, Articulate
  • 5 Tips for Revising Bad E-learning Scripts | Daniel Brigham, Articulate MVP
  • Developing Effective Multiple Choice Questions | Patti Shank, E-Learning Author & Consultant
  • Creating Original Characters for Your Course on a Budget | Chris Perez, Hitachi
  • How to Get the Right Look & Feel for Your Course | David Anderson, Articulate Community Manager
  • Five Ways to Personalize an E-Learning Course | Tim Slade, Articulate MVP
  • How to Build Your E-Learning Portfolio | Ashley Chiasson, E-Learning Consultant

 

Day 2 (Sept 11): Articulate Tools & Applications

  • Create Interactive Video | Tom Kuhlmann, VP, Community, Articulate
  • I Got the Software. Now What? | Ryan Harrison, Colorado Association of School Executives
  • Tips & Tricks to Enhance Your E-Learning | Stephanie Harnett, Articulate MVP
  • Creating Personalized E-Learning with Articulate Storyline | Tim Slade, Articulate MVP
  • Animating Your Scenes Using Stop Motion Techniques | Chris Perez, Hitachi
  • Tips & Tricks to Help Your SME Help You | Gerry Wasiluk, Articulate MVP  

 

Looking Back on A Year’s Worth of E-Learning Challenges Posted Friday, August 29, 2014 at 5:03 PM

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One year ago, we tried something new by posting the first e-learning challenge, which was about showing meaningful comparisons in e-learning. Three people shared demos that week and I considered it an immediate success. If three people shared for a year, we’d have 36 examples to inspire and educate other users.

 

Today, 48 challenges later, you and your fellow community members have shared over 750 e-learning demos, examples, and ideas. That’s more than twenty times what I imagined!

 

I want to thank each and every one of you for sharing examples, source files, ideas, and time for a great first year of challenges. I can’t get over how generous our community is, and I feel like the luckiest guy on earth to be part of it.


E-Learning Superlatives

To celebrate this challenge milestone, you’re now an honorary member of the E-Learning Challenge Yearbook Committee. That means you’re in charge of recognizing your fellow classmates course designers and the demos shared over the past year.


It’s your chance to add a memory or two to the challenge yearbook. Nominate a fellow student designer for a superlative, just like we did in school. Below are some superlatives to get you started. Pull from the list or create your own.


Suggestions for superlatives:

  • Best Use of Humor

  • Most Likely to Post the First Challenge Demo

  • Best Freelance Gig Resulting from a Challenge

  • Most Recognizable Design Style

  • Best Use of an Appendage in a Demo

  • Most Likely to Share Their Source File

  • Most Appealing Narration Voice

  • Most Likely to Avoid the Next Button

You can add your e-learning superlatives in the comments below, or mock up your own photo to add to the yearbook. I’ll kick things off with a superlative I think we’ll all agree on:

 

Most Likely to Complete Every Challenge

Jackie Van Nice joined the challenges five months ago and completed her 48th challenge this week. That’s an accomplishment that deserves some recognition. You can view all of Jackie's challenge demos on her website. Way to go, Jackie!


Okay, it’s your turn. Whether you shared a demo or simply gleaned some inspiration from a demo, please take this week to recognize each other for the creative and generous ideas they shared over the past year.


About the challenges

Challenge enrollments are always open. If you skipped a challenge or had to drop out for personal reasons, don’t worry! You can always make it up for full credit.

 

To get credit for a challenge, complete a challenge and post a link to your demo in the challenge comments.

 

Stay cool E-Learning Heroes and don’t party work too hard! See you next year week!

 

Recap #48 E-Learning Storyboards Posted Thursday, August 28, 2014 at 2:52 PM

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E-Learning Challenge #48: Storyboard Templates for E-Learning

 

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, storyboards are critical to e-learning success. Whether you’re using text-based storyboards or detailed visual storyboards, there’s a storyboard format for every project and course designer.

 

This week's challenge features free storyboard templates, tips and insights, and even video tutorials! Please take some time to read and comment on the uber helpful storyboard articles your fellow community members shared this week.

 

A big E-Learning Heroes shoutout to first-time challengers Ajay GuptaGena Hocson, and Nicola Redfearn! Thanks for joining the challenges. We're really glad you're here.

 

New to the challenges?

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Have a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

 

Patricio Bustamante

Patricio’s desk and storyboard example | e-Learning Ninja | @patob2000

 

 

Jeff Kortenbosch and Kevin Thorn

Download Storyboard Template |  Serious Learning (Jeff) | NuggetHead Studioz (Kevin) | @elearningjeff @LearnNuggets

 

 

Melissa Milloway

What’s in an e-learning storyboard? | @MelMilloway

 

Jackie Van Nice

The Challenge of Storyboarding (+Free Template!) | @jackietrains

 

Ashley Chiasson

Storyboard Templates for E-Learning | @amdchiasson

 

Donna Carson

E-Learning Challenge: Storyboarding | @ElearninCanBfun

 

 

Jennifer Valley

Storyboard Templates for E-Learning | @jvalley0714

 

Nicola Redfearn

Download Nicola’s Storyboard Template | Nicola Redfearn

 

Gena Hocson

E-Learning Storyboards

 

Daniel Brigham

 

Storyboarding Essentials Screencast

 

 

 

3 Ways to Storyboard Your E-Learning Course

 

Richard Watson

 

Storyboards for e-Learning | @bridgehillLS

 

Ajay Gupta

 

Free Product Tour Template in PowerPoint 2007 | @epiphanylearnin

 

Andrew Sellon

 

Storyboarding 101 – Creating the Blueprint For Your eLearning | @AndrewSellonNY

 

 

 

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

E-Learning Challenges Posted Sunday, August 24, 2014 at 4:30 AM

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The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. 

 

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.


Flat Design Graphics for E-Learning #50

This week your challenge is to design an office or desktop theme based on your own workplace environment. Design as many objects as you like. For variety, try adding both top and front views of your workspace.

Flat Design Office Graphics: Challenge | Recap

 

Webcam Video in E-Learning #49

This week your challenge is to create a webcam video to introduce yourself and the types of e-learning projects you enjoy most.

Webcam Video Training: Challenge | Recap

 

Storyboard Templates for E-Learning #48

This week your challenge is to share an example of your preferred e-learning storyboard, blueprint, or scripting template. We want to see what you use and learn how you use it!

 Storyboard Templates for E-Learning:  Challenge | Recap

 

Call Center Training in Online Learning #47

This week your challenge is to design a call center interaction. You can choose any area of call center training you like. Don’t worry about scripting out a detailed or authentic storyboard.  Prototypes, unfinished interactions, and even sketches are perfectly acceptable.

Call Center Training in Online Learning:  Challenge | Recap

 

Show Us Your E-Learning Portfolio #46

This week’s challenge is all about your e-learning portfolios. We already know you do awesome work, and we want to help others find your awesome work.

Show Us Your E-Learning Portfolios: Challenge | Recap

 

Recording Audio in Online Training #45

This week, your challenge is to share your audio recording deets with the community. We want to know all about your audio recording: your best practices, your gear, your processes, even your quirks and tricks that give your audio that special something. Maybe you record your best audio dressed up in a chicken suit—no worries, we don’t judge how you get it done.

E-learning audio tips challenge | View the audio tips recap

Virtual Tours in Online Training #44

This week, your challenge is to design a virtual tour of a real or fictional location. You can use any photos, illustrations, audio, and video you like to create your tour.

Virtual tours in e-learning challenge | View the virtual tours examples

 

Interactive Org Charts and Meet the Team #43

This week, your challenge is to design an interactive graphic to introduce an organization’s team members or key players. You can focus on corporate teams, sports teams, or something more playful like comic book characters.

View the org chart challenge | View the org chart examples

 

Smartphone Video Training #42

This week, your challenge is to record, edit, and publish a training video using your smartphone. Choose a topic that allows you to record multiple videos for your project. The focus on this challenge is as much about editing as it is recording. 

Smartphone video training | View the smartphone video examples

Low-Tech, High-Speed Course Design #41

This week, your challenge is to create an emergency-response course using pen and paper.

 

Select a news story or training course that focuses on a disaster or emergency event and create a 3-5 slide course to help learners navigate the event. Because you’re creating everything by hand, you’ll really need to focus on the basics.

Rapid sketch design in e-learning

Instructional Design Quizzes #40

This week your challenge is to create a quiz that tests learners on an instructional design principle, model, researcher, or theorist. You can create any type of quiz you like. Go with the timeless multiple choice or true-false questions, or create something more playful using a custom quiz. You can make the quiz as simple or challenging as you like… Just keep it fair and practical.

 

Keep in mind the objective is to reinforce basic instructional design principles using interactive quizzes. It’s more about the content this week.

Instructional design quiz

 

Podcasts for Learning #39

This week your challenge is to record your answers to the following 10 interview questions.

View the Podcast Challenge

 

Steal This E-Learning Template #38

This week your challenge is to repurpose the Create Your Own Quest template into something of your own.

E-learning template makeover | View the templates recap

 

Spelling Bees and Interactive Vocabulary Quizzes #37

This week your challenge is to build an interactive vocabulary quiz. You can focus your interaction on spelling, pronunciation, comprehension, or anything else.

Interactive spelling bees

 

Interactive Step Graphics in Online Training #36

This week your challenge is to build a step graphic to tell a story or communicate a process. Choose any topic you like and see if you can find creative ways to present the step graphic navigation.

Interactive step graphics in e-learning

 

What’s In Your Course Design Toolkit? #35

This week your challenge is to share your favorite, free tools that make your course design easier.

E-learning toolkits for designers

Instructional Design Learning Activities #34

This week your challenge is to create an interaction that introduces an instructional design principle, model, researcher, or theorist. Interactions can be anything from simple Engage interactions that present terms and definitions to custom games created in Storyline.

Instructional design practice activities

 

Fix Your E-Learning Mistakes #33

This week your challenge is to give your slides a proper makeover. Assume the bad slide designs were given to you by your client and that it’s your job to make them right.

Fix your e-learning mistakes challenge

Death, Taxes, and E-Learning Mistakes #32

This week, your challenge is to design one or more slides featuring common course mistakes. Yes, mistakes. Unleash those pet peeves and visual nightmares. Don’t hold back. Amplify the mistakes. Let us feel the pain of bad e-learning.

E-learning mistakes

 

Creative Resume Templates for E-Learning Portfolios #31

This week, your challenge is to design an interactive resume or portfolio showcasing your e-learning work. You can show all your work or highlight only a couple of your favorite projects.

E-learning portfolios challenge

 

What Do E-Learning Designers Really Do? #30

This week, your challenge is to design a visual chart using the “What People Think I Do / What I really Do” meme.  You can choose any job role you like: instructional designer, course designer, Super Hero, or any other title that interests you.

What do e-learning designers do?

 

Summary and Resource Slides in Online Courses #29

This week, your challenge is to design an e-learning conclusion or summary slide. You can focus your entry on instructions for closing the course, job aids to support the course, or even additional resources for learners to continue learning.

 

This week’s challenge is all about design ideas for presenting summary slides and resources. You don’t need to build out a working interaction—but I know many of you will, and that’s totally cool, too.

Summary and resource slides

 

Top 10 Things Learners Need to Know About Storyline #28

This week your challenge is to put together a Top 10 list of “getting started” tutorials for any area of Storyline development you like.

Top 10 Articulate Storyline tips

 

Visual Storytelling with Photo Collages #27

This week, your challenge is to create an interactive story around a photo collage. You can use placeholder photos and graphics, or rework an existing project into a photo collage.

Visual storytelling with photo collages

 

Interactive Screenshots for Online Training #26

This week, your challenge is to create an interactive screenshot for an application’s UI or specific features.

Interactive screenshots in e-learning

 

Instructional Design Tips That Really Pop #25

This week your challenge is to design a poster around your favorite education or instructional design quote. Your quote can be serious, playful, or even a little snarky. The text is simply the vehicle for your favorite tip designed as a typography poster.

Instructional Design Tips

 

Create a Simple E-Learning Game #24

This week your challenge is to build a simple e-learning game in either Storyline or Quizmaker.

E-learning games challenge

 

Decision Map to Branching Scenarios #23

This week your challenge is to build a branching interaction based on the What Kind of Leader Are You? infographic.

 

This challenge is all about interpreting an existing simulation map and bringing it to life. Use whatever design style you like. This can include using characters, boxes and arrows, LOL Cats or anything else you can dream up. We just want to see what you can come up with using the infographic as a starting point.

Interactive branching scenarios challenge

 

Design an Olympic-Themed E-Learning Template #22

This week your challenge is to design an e-learning template for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. You can design a general template for the Winter Olympics, or focus your template around a specific country or event.

Olympic theme templates

 

Beyond the Basic Drag-and-Drop Interaction #21

This week your challenge is to build a drag-and-drop interaction based on one of the three examples above. Don’t have time to put an activity together? No problem. Just share some ideas for ways to use drag-and-drop in non-quizzing activities. We’ll pull the ideas together and use them for a future challenge!

Advanced drag-and-drop interactions in e-learning

 

Ask Your Learners to Prove They’re Learning (NEXTCHA) #20

This week your challenge is to build your own NEXTCHA solutions that help reinforce learning content while preventing learners from mindlessly clicking the Next buttons.

In the challenge, you don’t have to limit NEXTCHA to text entry fields, but please limit your demos to text-based interactions.

NEXTCHA in e-learning challenge

 

Screencasts and Software Simulations in Online Training #19

This week your challenge is to record a screencast or software simulation. You can choose any type of topic that interests you.

Screencasts and simulations in e-learning

 

Using Characters in E-Learning #18

This week your challenge is to show us how to use characters in e-learning. You can create static slides that show character-based ideas, or build something more dynamic to show the interaction between characters

Characters in e-learning challenge | View the community examples

 

Using Job Aids in E-Learning #17

This week your challenge is to show us how to use job aids in e-learning. You can share examples of job aids that were used in place of courses, integrated into courses, or offered as course alternatives.

E-Learning job aids

 

Creating Custom Drag-and-Drop E-Learning Interactions #16

This week your challenge is to show some creative ways to use drag-drop interactions.

Custom drag-and-drop e-learning interactions

 

Create a Radiant Template with Pantone’s Color of the Year #15

This week your challenge is to use Radiant Orchid as the base color for your e-learning templates. Include at least three different content slides, and more if you’d like. Your slides can be static or built out as working interactions. Your goal is to work from a single color and show how you will carry that color across your design templates.

Create an e-learning template using Pantone's radiant orchid

Give Your Quiz Results Slides a Makeover #14

This week, your challenge is to show us your best, your most creative quiz results designs. Show us as many makeover designs as you can imagine.

Customize your e-learning quiz results

 

Interactive Timelines for E-Learning #13

This week, your challenge is to rebuild Big History Project’s interactive timeline.

 

This is our first challenge where everyone is working from the same source project. The tool you use to recreate this project will impact your design considerations. For example, the dynamic menu effect is not possible with most tools. You’ll want to capture the essence of the effect, whichever tool you choose.

Interactive timelines in e-learning

 

Transform Infographics Into Interactive Graphics #12

This week your challenge will be to take a static infographic and rebuild it as an interactive infographic.

Creating interactive graphics from infographics

 

Design a Comic Book Theme for Your E-Learning Course #11

This week, your challenge is to design your own comic book e-learning template. Try to include multiple slides so you can show how the template will carry through your content.

Comic book theme designs in e-learning

 

Shoot Your Own E-Learning Background Graphics #10

Create a shot list of possible images and shoot your own background graphics using your office or work area as the primary location. When you share your photos, please include your shot list and at least one original photo so we can compare the before and after.

Create your own e-learning graphics

 

Design an Ethics Course Template with Clip Art #9

Using clip art Style 1368, design a course template for a corporate ethics e-learning course.  Include at least three content slides and two quizzing slides. Your slides can be static or built out as working interactions. We just want to see how your template carries across your project.

Create an ethics e-learning course from clip art

 

Create an E-Learning Template from Clip Art #8

Show and share your clip art-inspired template using one or more clip art objects. Create one or more e-learning template slides using free clip art objects.

Creating e-learning templates from clip art

 

Converting Static Content to Interactive Knowledge Checks #7

Show and share your interactive makeovers using an existing slide from one of your projects. Convert an existing content slide and convert it to an interaction using one of the Storyline’s six free-form questions.

Convert static content into interactive knowledge checks

 

Bring This Medical Training Course Back To Life! #6

Show and share your re-design ideas for a medical e-learning course template. Using the source files provided, create a clean, flat, medical design theme. Try to work within the provided color requirements (included in the forum thread and the source files) and comp out 2-3 slides for this design.

Medical course design makeover in e-learning

 

Desktop and Office Theme Designs #5

Create an office or desktop course template. Include at least three different content slides, and more if you’d like. Your slides can be static or built out as working interactions. The objective is to show how us how your design will carry across your project.

Desktop office themes in e-learning

 

Flatten Up Your Course Design Skills #4

Show and share your best flat design template ideas for e-learning. Create a flat design course template. Include at least three different content slides, and more if you’d like. Your slides can be static or built out as working interactions. The objective is to show how your flat design will carry across your project.

Flat design in e-learning

 

Gate Screens in Online Courses #3

Design a two-slide interaction that includes a content screen and a gate screen. The content screen can be a placeholder screen. The key is to show how your gate screen will load and close in relation to the course.

Gate screens in e-learning

 

What’s Your Best Tabs Interaction? #2

Design a 5-tab interaction. Tabs should be on the left or the right and need to be persistent over slides or layers. 

E-Learning Tabs Interactions

 

How Would You Show Meaningful Comparisons? #1

Design an interactive graphic to show relative sizes for a series of airplanes. Check out this Wikipedia entry on giant aircraft for inspiration.

Showing Comparisons in E-Learning:  Challenge | Recap

 



Post written by David Anderson

 

 

Share Your Social Networks with the E-Learning Community Posted Friday, August 22, 2014 at 9:02 PM

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If you’re like most course designers, E-Learning Heroes is a major hub of your online presence. Day in and day out, you and fellow community members build relationships by sharing expertise, solving problems, and giving away really cool stuff.  However, chances are you’re always looking for new ways to extend your online presence and grow your network. 

 

If you Tweet, Like, Pin, Connect, +1, or blog, please share your social networks (with links) in the comments below. You don’t need to share everything—just the networks you use professionally.

 

To get things started, here's where you can find Articulate:

 

Blogs:

Social Networks:


Post written by David Anderson

 

E-Learning Challenge #48: Storyboard Templates for E-Learning Posted Friday, August 22, 2014 at 3:57 PM

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Whether you prefer scripts, blueprints, or rapid prototypes, chances are you’re using some type of storyboard to plan and organize your e-learning projects. In most cases, successful projects depend on the designer’s use of a storyboard.


Storyboards are also one of the most popular discussions in our forums. New designers ask to see examples, download templates, and learn more about workflows and using storyboards. Experienced designers share their favorite tools and tips while debating the use of storyboards and prototypes.


Regardless of your experience, storyboards are a critical element in the course design process. And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to share an example of your preferred e-learning storyboard, blueprint, or scripting template. We want to see what you use and learn how you use it!


Share your storyboard templates

Do you have a storyboard template you’d like to share with the community? Great! Share your template in the comments and we’ll feature it in our downloads gallery.


Questions to answer

Whether you share a template this week or just want to join the discussion, I’d love to get your feedback on one or more of following questions:

  • How do you define scripting, storyboarding, and prototyping? Which method do you prefer?

  • Do you use different types of storyboards? When do you use each?

  • How do you storyboard interactivity?

  • What are your top three storyboard tips for new course creators?

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to create your e-learning storyboard examples.


Resources

Here are a few resources to get you thinking about storyboards.


Storyboard templates:

Blog posts:

Forum discussions:

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your e-learning storyboard and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your e-learning storyboard.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your e-learning storyboard process. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. 

  • TwitterIf you share your e-learning storyboards on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • FacebookReply to this Facebook post with a screenshot of your e-learning storyboard and a link to your template or blog post.

Last week’s challenge

Before you storyboard this  week’s challenge, take a moment to check out the e-learning call center demos your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:

E-Learning Challenge #47: Call Center Training in Online Learning

 

 


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Recap #47: Call Center Support in E-Learning Posted Thursday, August 21, 2014 at 2:10 PM

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E-Learning Challenge #47: Call Center Training in Online Learning

 

Howdy E-Learning Heroes! I hope you're enjoying this week's challenge.

 

After seeing what you folks come up with week after week, I think the slogan "There's an app for that" should be changed to "There's an E-Learning Hero for that!" You guys are amazing amazing. Thanks to everyone who shared a demo, source file, or supportive feedback this week. 

 

Interested in sharing a call center demo?

We'd love to see your work. Just add a link in the comments below and we'll update this post to include your example. And if you share your challenge demos on Twitter, use #ELHchallenge so your tweeps can find your e-learning coolness.You're also welcome to share your call center demo on our Facebook call center challenge page.

 

Keep up the amazing work, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

Call Center Software Training

View Jackie's Call Center Interaction | Jackie Van Nice | Blog post | @JackieTrains

Call Center Training Demo

View Tim's Call Center Training Example | Download Source | Tim Slade | Blog Post | @sladetim | Pinterest

 

Dealing with Irate Callers

View Dealing with Irate Callers Demo | Nick Russell | Website

Call Centre

View Tracy's Call Centre Demo | Tracy Parish | Blog Post | @TracyParish

 

Call Center Training for Concierges

View Donielle's Training Demo | Donielle Bell

 

Call Center Comic Book Game

View Andrew's Comic Book Game | Andrew Sellon | Blog Post | @AndrewSellonNY

 

Handling Difficult Calls

View Handling Difficult Callers | George Aston | @georgeaston

 

Call Center Interactive Training

View Daniel's Interactive Demo | Source File | Daniel Adeboye | Blog Post

 

Call Center Training - Studio ‘13

View Jeff's Studio '13 Demo | Source File | Jeff Kortenbosch | Serious Learning | @elearningjeff

 

Taxi Tasks

View Mellissa's Taxi Tasks Interaction | Melissa Milloway | Website | @MelMilloway


Call Center Training Challenge

View Gerard's Call Center Demo | Gerard Friel | Blog Post | @gerardfriel

 

Call Center Scenario

Download Jennifer's PowerPoint File | Jennifer Valley | Blog Post | @jvalley0714

 

Call Center Training

Call Center Training Example  | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

 

Call Center Interaction

Call Center Training Example | Nagarjuna Veeramallu | Pixentia | @pixentia

 


 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

10 Fresh and Free E-Learning Templates for Articulate Storyline Posted Tuesday, August 19, 2014 at 7:45 PM

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I'm constantly amazed by all the generous course designers who share freely their source files in the Articulate community. Every time I jump into the forums it seems someone's sharing another free template. Below you'll find 10 fresh and free e-learning templates for Articulate Storyline.

 

More E-Learning Template Recaps

 

 

 

Interactive Org Chart: Apple’s Leadership Team

View Interactive Org Chart | Download Template | Tim Slade | Blog Post | @sladetim

 

 

 

Virtual Tour Template

Virtual Tour Example | Download Template | Jackie Van Nice | Blog Post | @jackietrains

 

 

Guided Image Interaction

View Guided Image Interaction | Download Template | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

 

History Timeline

View Interactive Timeline | Download Template | David Glow | Website | @CriticalLearner

 

 

E-Learning Challenge #47: Call Center Training in Online Learning Posted Friday, August 15, 2014 at 2:59 PM

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Update: View the call center examples from this week's challenge

 

One of our most popular interactions is the call center scenario that ships with Storyline. It’s not popular because it’s the world’s best-looking interaction—it isn't.  

 

It’s a popular template because call center training is a popular topic. Almost every company has some degree of customer support training and this template is the go-to template for call center training.

As the saying goes, if the only call center template you have is the built-in Two-Person Scenario, then that's the one you use. Hopefully not after this week's challenge! 

 

What Do Call Centers Look Like?

Spoiler alert: Call centers all look the same. At least most of them do.

 

Don't believe me? Try searching for “call center” in any stock photo site and you’ll find the typical images for call centers.

Stock photography won't always help us personalize interactions for a specific industry. 


Two Ways to Personalize Your Call Center Designs

I'm guessing most call center employees dress business casual and work from offsite locations that look roughly the same across industries. To personalize your slides to your topic, you need to play off your topic's visual voice and that involves a wardrobe and set change. Here are some quick examples:


Uniforms create context

If you don't have the right stock characters for your project, try giving them a wardrobe change. The good news is you don't need much to transform a business character's look and feel.


Backgrounds create context

Background images are the largest image on your slide making them one of the best ways to establish context and a sense of location.

A quick background change can transform an air transportation theme into a medical theme:


Support training is a big part of e-learning. Finding creative ways to create call center training is what this week's challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to design a call center interaction. You can choose any area of call center training you like. Don’t worry about scripting out a detailed or authentic storyboard.  Prototypes, unfinished interactions, and even sketches are perfectly acceptable.

 

Do you design call center training?

That's great. Feel free to share examples you’ve already built. This week's challenge is all about sharing creative ideas and we'd love to see what you've created.

 

Need some ideas to get you started?

Feel free to use use placeholder content for your interaction. The topics below are only ideas to guide your use of placeholder content.


  • Call center training for broadcast & internet companies

  • Anatomy of a call center

  • Reducing wait times

  • Dealing with angry customers

  • Rebuild Storyline's two-person scenario interaction

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to design your call center interaction.


Resources

Here are a few resources to help kickstart your creative juices:

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. 

  • TwitterIf you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • FacebookReply to this Facebook post with a screenshot of your project and a link to your demo.

Last week’s challenge

Before you dial into this week’s challenge, take a break to check out the e-learning portfolios your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:


E-Learning Challenge #46: Show Us Your E-Learning Portfolio

 

 


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson