10 Fresh and Free E-Learning Templates for Articulate Storyline Posted 4 hours ago

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I'm constantly amazed by all the generous course designers who share freely their source files in the Articulate community. Every time I jump into the forums it seems someone's sharing another free template. Below you'll find 10 fresh and free e-learning templates for Articulate Storyline.

 

More E-Learning Template Recaps

 

 

 

Interactive Org Chart: Apple’s Leadership Team

View Demo | Download Template | Tim Slade | Blog Post | @sladetim

 

 

 

Virtual Tour Template

View Demo | Download Template | Jackie Van Nice | Blog Post | @jackietrains

 

 

Guided Image Interaction

View Demo | Download Template | Jeff Kortenbosch | Website | @elearningjeff

 

 

History Timeline

View Demo | Download Template | David Glow | Website | @CriticalLearner

 

Interactive Org Chart

View Demo | Download Template | Paul Alders | Website | @paulalders

 

Interactive Org Chart

View Demo | Download Template | Nick Leffler | Website | @technkl

 

Matching Template

View Demo | Download Template | Kawstov FLIP | Website

 

Colors Menu Storyline Template

View Demo | Download Template | Nick Leffler | Website | @technkl

 

Progress Meter

View Demo | Download Template | Bruce Graham | Website | @brucuk

 

Interactive Timeline

View Demo | Download Template | David Lindenberg | Website | @dvdlindenberg

 

 

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

E-Learning Challenge #47: Call Center Training in Online Learning Posted Friday, August 15, 2014 at 2:59 PM

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One of our most popular interactions is the call center scenario that ships with Storyline. It’s not popular because it’s the world’s best-looking interaction—it isn't.  

 

It’s a popular template because call center training is a popular topic. Almost every company has some degree of customer support training and this template is the go-to template for call center training.

As the saying goes, if the only call center template you have is the built-in Two-Person Scenario, then that's the one you use. Hopefully not after this week's challenge! 

 

What Do Call Centers Look Like?

Spoiler alert: Call centers all look the same. At least most of them do.

 

Don't believe me? Try searching for “call center” in any stock photo site and you’ll find the typical images for call centers.

Stock photography won't always help us personalize interactions for a specific industry. 


Two Ways to Personalize Your Call Center Designs

I'm guessing most call center employees dress business casual and work from offsite locations that look roughly the same across industries. To personalize your slides to your topic, you need to play off your topic's visual voice and that involves a wardrobe and set change. Here are some quick examples:


Uniforms create context

If you don't have the right stock characters for your project, try giving them a wardrobe change. The good news is you don't need much to transform a business character's look and feel.


Backgrounds create context

Background images are the largest image on your slide making them one of the best ways to establish context and a sense of location.

A quick background change can transform an air transportation theme into a medical theme:


Support training is a big part of e-learning. Finding creative ways to create call center training is what this week's challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to design a call center interaction. You can choose any area of call center training you like. Don’t worry about scripting out a detailed or authentic storyboard.  Prototypes, unfinished interactions, and even sketches are perfectly acceptable.

 

Do you design call center training?

That's great. Feel free to share examples you’ve already built. This week's challenge is all about sharing creative ideas and we'd love to see what you've created.

 

Need some ideas to get you started?

Feel free to use use placeholder content for your interaction. The topics below are only ideas to guide your use of placeholder content.


  • Call center training for broadcast & internet companies

  • Anatomy of a call center

  • Reducing wait times

  • Dealing with angry customers

  • Rebuild Storyline's two-person scenario interaction

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to design your call center interaction.


Resources

Here are a few resources to help kickstart your creative juices:

Share your e-learning work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project and blog post.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published demo.

  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. 

  • TwitterIf you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

  • FacebookReply to this Facebook post with a screenshot of your project and a link to your demo.

Last week’s challenge

Before you dial into this week’s challenge, take a break to check out the e-learning portfolios your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:


E-Learning Challenge #46: Show Us Your E-Learning Portfolio

 

 


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Recap #46: E-Learning Portfolios Posted Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 12:47 PM

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E-Learning Challenge #46: Show Us Your E-Learning Portfolio

 

No matter what types of e-learning you build, there’s a lot to learn from reviewing work from other designers. I can’t tell you how much I’ve enjoyed checking out your portfolios. Thanks to everyone who shared their work this week.

 

Want to share your e-learning portfolio with the community? Add a link to the comments below and send me the header graphic you’d like to use to promote your work. The image dimensions should be: 550x275.

 

If you share your portfolio on Twitter, use #ELHchallenge so we can find your work.You're also welcome to share your portfolio on our Facebook portfolio page.

 

Keep up the amazing work, E-Learning Heroes!

 

 

 

Jackie Van Nice

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Blog post | Twitter | Pinterest

 

Richard Watson

 

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Twitter | Pinterest

 

Dan Sweigert

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Twitter

 

 

Keith Freeman

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio

 

Nancy Woinoski

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Montse Anderson

 

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Joe Gray

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio

 

Dianne Hope

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Matt Guyan

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Ashley Chiasson

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Nick Leffler

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Trina Rimmer

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Melissa Milloway

 

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

 

Tim Slade

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter | Pinterest

 

Simon Perkins

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio

 

Josh Stoner

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Stephanie Harnett

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Mary Beth Faccioli

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Jennifer Valley

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Farrah Faruqui

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Daniel Adeboye

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Blog Post

 

Allison Nederveld

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Andrew Sellon

ELH Profile | Online PortfolioTwitter

 

Nick Russell

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio


Bryan Jones

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Twitter 

 

Phil Mayor

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Twitter 

 

Donna Carson

ELH Profile | Online Portfolio | Twitter 

 

 


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

E-Learning Challenge #46: Show Us Your E-Learning Portfolio Posted Friday, August 08, 2014 at 5:32 PM

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“You had me at hello.”

There’s an interesting post at the Guardian this week. Evidently it takes a half a second for people to judge whether you’re trustworthyAssuming that’s true, how long do you think it takes someone to judge your e-learning trustworthiness?

 

Portfolios are like e-learning selfies

Just like book covers, movie posters, and every other type of product packaging, your e-learning screenshots convey an impression. How you present them matters.

 

Disagree? Ask yourself how many times you’ve changed your Facebook profile picture in the last year. What about your LinkedIn picture? I think it’s time course designers spent the same amount of time on their portfolio pictures as they do on their social media pictures.


And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about!


Be deliberate when you show your work

You don’t need a portfolio of award-winning courses to be judged, “e-learning trustworthy.” Your goal should be to present the projects you have as if they’re award-winning courses. There’s a difference and I’ll show you an example.


Earlier this week one of our community members wrote me to review his portfolio. I can’t show his work here so I’m using one of our demo courses to illustrate the point.

 

In one example, he had a project for a well-known company. But the screenshot he used was from an Articulate Engage interaction.


There’s nothing wrong with Engage, but Engage interactions are templates that are mostly built for you. So even with some slick color and font skinning, the interaction is already shaped by the software. He should have led with one of the more custom slides he built.

 

Remember, what you show matters.


Give a crop about screenshots

Most e-learning courses are created around a 4:3 aspect ratio with a slide size of 720x540. That’s the standard, but there exceptions.


If your online portfolio's thumbnails are based on the same aspect ratio, then you don’t have a problem. But if your portfolio page is based around a different aspect ratio, you need to get creative in how you show your work.

 

Show the full slide

The most common way users display their work is by grabbing a screenshot of the entire slide. It’s an easy technique because it doesn’t require any additional editing. As long as your portfolio page or template uses the same aspect ratio, this format is perfect.

 


Find interesting elements

Another approach is to show creative or interesting elements from a slide. This means you won’t show everything at once. I do this for your challenge recap posts each week.


This works great when you’re limited on space or want to show a lot of thumbnails on the page. You can see a working example in our Storyline downloads. Nearly all the templates are 4:3 but our site's thumbnails are displayed in landscape mode.

 

Rebuild the screens

Have you ever noticed that movie posters are always shown in portrait mode while the movies are filmed in landscape mode? Clearly it would have been easier to take a still from the movie and use it for the poster. Instead, designers create custom designs—in portrait modeto promote the movie. That's something course designers can do, too!


There’s nothing wrong with creating a custom screenshot for each space where you share your projects. It’s a bit more work, but it’s the best way to control your screenshots across different social channels.

 


Challenge of the week

This week’s challenge is all about your e-learning portfolios. We already know you do awesome work, and we want to help others find your awesome work.


There are four parts to this week’s challenge:

 

Part 1: Share your e-learning portfolio

Using the comments section below, include a link to your e-learning portfolio page. This should take you less than one minute. Woot!

 

Part 2: Create the header image for next week’s recap post

That’s right! I’m taking the week off from photo editing. This week you’re creating your header image for the recap post. 

 

You can show a single project or pull together a collage of projects. Use a screenshot of your website. Or use your logo. Or use a cute kitty. It’s up to you what you show. Check out last week’s recap post for an example.


  • Screenshot dimensions: 550x275. That’s a 2:1 aspect ratio.

NOTE: This part could get spammy, so I’m reserving editorial control to ensure submissions are viewer-friendly.

 

Part 3: Create portfolio screenshots for Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest

We’re getting a long way from the 4:3 aspect ratio, now. Facebook and Twitter both use landscape modes. This means your 720x540 e-learning screenshots aren’t optimized for Facebook and Twitter. Pinterest is a little more flexible.


The emphasis in this part is on adapting your screenshots for different social channels. You’ll need to crop or create versions of your portfolio header image so they align with each channel’s image specs.

 

Twitter and Facebook will auto-crop your images so they fit the stream. That sounds nice, right? Yes and no. Failing to respect the different aspect ratios could mean cutting off the heads of your customers. Sorry guys.

 

Thanks to @KellyMeeker for calling this to my attention. I won’t make that mistake again.


Part 4: Share your portfolio on social media

Twitter:

Tweet your screenshots and a link to your portfolio. Remember to include #ELHChallenge so we can find them

  • Image sizes: Twitter follows a 2:1 aspect ratio and recommends sizing images at 1024x512. 

  • This is the same aspect ratio I’m now using for challenge recap posts so you kind of get a pass with this one.

Facebook:

Reply to this Facebook post with your portfolio screenshot and a link back to your portfolio.


Pinterest:

Pin your portfolio image to your Pinterest board and use #elhchallenge. I'll search for the tag and re-pin your images to the Elearning Portfolio. You can message me to let me know you've pinned your image, too. But I'll check Pinterest each day for new #elhchallenge pins.

  • Image sizes: You’re not limited to using the same 2:1 aspect ratio like you did for Twitter and the challenge recap.

  • Pinterest pins use a fixed width of 236 pixels. You can use a height of up to 882 pixels so that gives you some interesting options.

  • The single image size is capped at 736 pixels wide and 1102 pixels tall.


Last week’s e-learning challenge

E-Learning Audio Tips & Tricks

 

Before you show off the cool work you’re doing in this week’s challenge, take peek at the audio tips your fellow community members shared in last week’s audio challenge:

 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Wishing you a pretty-as-a-picture week, E-Learning Heroes!

 


Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Recap #45: Best E-Learning Audio Tips Posted Thursday, August 07, 2014 at 2:09 PM

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How do e-learning designers record high-quality audio every time? What's the best microphone for recording narration?

 

Turns out, we know a few people who can answer those questions! Thanks to everyone who shared and participated in this week's challenge. There's enough audio goodness to take everyone's recording to the next level!

 

And a special thanks to our first-time challengers who joined this week. We're glad you're here!

 

 

New to the challenges?

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. And if you tweet your projects, try using #ELHChallenge so we can track the cool demos you share.

 

Thanks, E-Learning Heroes! You folks do awesome work!

 

 

Tim Slade

 

Recording Professional Quality Audio from Home

 

 

Author: Tim Slade

Twitter: @sladetim

 

Tom Kuhlmann

 

Tips & Tricks for Recording Audio Narration

 

 

Author: Tom Kuhlmann

Twitter: @TomKuhlmann

 

Tricia Ransom

 

Recording Audio in Online Training

 

 

Author: Tricia Ransom

Twitter: @TriciaRansom

 

Amy Iannucci

 

Amy's audio tips

 

 

Author: Amy Iannucci

 

Jackie Van Nice

 

How I Record Audio for E-Learning

 

 

Author: Jackie Van Nice

Twitter: @JackieTrains

 

Dan Sweigert

 

Sound Advice

 

 

Author: Dan Sweigert

Twitter: @elearningwdan

 

Nicole Legault

 

Audio Recording Tips

 

 

Author: Nicole Legault

Twitter: @nicole_legault

 

Mike Schwind

 

How We Record Audio

 

 

Author: Mike Schwind

Website: SchwindTEC eLearning Solutions

Twitter: @slivo6

 

Melissa Milloway

 

It's all in the audio!

 

 

Author: Melissa Milloway

Twitter: @MelMilloway

 

Nick Russell

 

Audacity recording and editing tips

 

 

Author: Nick Russell

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

 

Tips for eLearning Audio recording on the go

 

 

Author: Jeff Kortenbosch

Twitter: @elearningjeff

 

Ashley Chiasson

 

Recording Audio in Online Training

 

 

Author: Ashley Chiasson

Twitter: @amdchiasson

 

Mary Beth Faccioli

 

Tips for Great Elearning Audio

 

 

Author: Mary Beth Faccioli

Website: Design Shorts

Twitter: @webmb

 

Jennifer Valley

 

Articulate eLearning Hero's Challenge #45

 

 

Author: Jennifer Valley

Twitter: @jvalley0714

 

Mister Learning

 

Mister Learning's audio tips

 

 

Author: Mister Learning

Twitter: @misterlearning

 

Bruce Graham

 

My Audio Setup

 

 

Author: Bruce Graham

Twitter: @brucuk

 

Andy Parker

 

Andy audio tips

 

 

Profile: Andy Parker

 

Tim Danner

 

Tim’s audio tips

 

 

Author: Tim Danner

 

Ellen Katz

 

Ellen’s audio recording tips

 

 

Author: Ellen Katz

 

Nick Leffler

Work from high to low and clean that audio up

 

 

Author: Nick Leffler

Twitter: @technkl

 

Rick Handville

 

PreSonus Studio One Free (free)

 

 

Profile: Rick Handville

Website: MassMutual

 

Michael Fimian

 

MirrorScriptPro (free)

 

 

Profile: Michael Fimian

Website: Instructional Tech

Twitter: @MichaelFimian

 

Jim Dickeson

 

This is not Jim Dickeson's desk

 

Jim’s audio tips

 

 

Profile: Jim Dickeson

Website: papaya works

 

David Thompson

 

David’s audio tips

 

 

Author: David Thompson

 

Richard Watson

 

Recording Audio in Online Training

 

 

Author: Richard Watson

Twitter: @bridgehillLS

 

Daniel Adeboye

What I learned this week

 

 

Author: Daniel Adeboye

Website: All4Krist

 

 

 

Marcus Erasmus

Marcus' e-learning tips

Author: Marcus Erasmus

Website: Hitachi Construction Machinery

 

 

E-Learning Challenge #45: Recording Audio in Online Training Posted Friday, August 01, 2014 at 2:50 PM

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If you’re like many course designers, you’ve probably had to record some audio for your e-learning courses. And recording audio is one of the simplest, most straightforward tasks you’ll perform in e-learning. You press the record button and—voilà!—you’re recording.


But what if you want to record high-quality audio? That’s easy, too. Every course designer knows that the key to great audio is… microphones. Right? Wait, it’s the recording software? No… Vocal booths? Mixers? Oh come on!


The reality is this: while recording audio is simple, there’s no one-size-fits-all approach to improving audio quality. That means that the most helpful audio tips are the tips that align with a user’s recording needs, experience, and environment. And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about!


Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to share your audio recording deets with the community. We want to know all about your audio recording: your best practices, your gear, your processes, even your quirks and tricks that give your audio that special something. Maybe you record your best audio dressed up in a chicken suit—no worries, we don’t judge how you get it done.

 

There are three parts to this week’s challenge:

1. Tell us about your recording setup.

What type of microphone do you use? Do you record directly into your authoring tool, or do you record with a third-party application like Audacity? Do you record in your cubicle, or do you have a specific audio recording room?

 

2. Show us your audio setup.

Where do you record your e-learning audio? Try to capture what a typical session looks like. It’s okay to clean your desk before taking a picture… just keep things as real-world as possible. Yes, this part requires a photo.


3. Share your three favorite audio recording tips.

We love tips, and rumor has it you guys have the best audio tips around. Share your favorites. No audio tip is too small. If something’s worked well for you, we want to know all about it.


Tools

You can share audio challenge using Articulate Studio, Articulate Storyline, PowerPoint, the forums, or your own blog. Since this is a slightly different challenge, you have more options for how you share your entries.


Resources

Last week’s challenge

Before you sound off in this week’s challenge, take a virtual tour of the amazing demos your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:

E-Learning Challenge #44: Virtual Tours in Online Training

 

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

Wishing you a safe-and-sound week, E-Learning Heroes!

 


Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.


Post written by David Anderson

 

Recap #44: Virtual Tours in E-Learning Posted Thursday, July 31, 2014 at 1:24 PM

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View E-Learning Challenge #44: Virtual Tours in Online Training

 

Whether you’re into princesses, chocolate, or boldly going where no course designer’s gone before, chances are you’ll find virtually everything you’re looking for in this week’s challenge.

 

A big E-Learning Heroes shoutout to first-time challenger Donielle Bell. Donielle introduced herself by sharing a beautiful city tour interaction. Thanks and welcome, Donielle! We're really glad you're here.

 

New to the challenges?

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. If you share your demos on Twitter, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

 

Thanks for a tour-iffic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 



Paris: A Virtual Tour

View Paris

Author: Nicole Legault

Website: Nicole’s Blog

Twitter: @nicole_legault


Wonka Chocolate Tour

View Wonka Chocolate Tour

 

Stock Clerk Tour

View Stock Clerk Tour

 

Author: Melissa Milloway

Blog: Drop that page turner for an immersive experience

Twitter: @MelMilloway


U.S.S. Defiant Virtual Tour

View U.S.S. Defiant Virtual Tour

Author: Tim Slade

Website: Tim Slade

Twitter: @sladetim

 

 

Virtual Tour of New South Wales (NSW)

View Virtual Tour of New South Wales (NSW)

Author: Matt Guyan

Website: Learning Snippets

Twitter: @MattGuyan

 


Disney Princesses at Epcot World Showcase

View Disney Princesses at Epcot World Showcase

Author: David Glow

Blog post: Business Critical Learning

Twitter: @CriticalLearner

 


My Scenic Route to E-learning Design

View My Scenic Route to E-learning Design

 

Author: Jackie Van Nice
Blog post and demo: My Scenic Route to E-learning Design
Storyline template: Download

Twitter: @JackieTrains

 

 

Virtual Office Security Tour

View Office Security Tour

Author: Tom Kuhlmann
Website: Rapid E-Learning Blog
Twitter: @TomKuhlmann
Demo: Office Security Tour
Storyline template: Download


A Virtual Tour of Oregon

View A Virtual Tour of Oregon

 

Author: Richard Watson
Blog post and demo: A Virtual Tour of Oregon

Screencast tutorial: View
Twitter: @bridgehillLS

 

Justin’s Real Estate and Movie Studio

View Justin’s Real Estate and Movie Studio

Author: Tracy Parish
Blog post and demo: Justin’s Real Estate and Movie Studio
Twitter: @TracyParish


Urban Prairie Primary Care Network

View Urban Prairie Primary Care Network

Author: Louisa Fricker
Twitter: @LouisaFx

 


Cities of the World

View Cities of the World

Author: Josh Stoner
Twitter: @joshuastoner

 


Virtual Home Tour PowerPoint

Download

Author: Daniel Adeboye

Website: All4Krist

Template: Download

 


Solar System: A Virtual Tour

View Solar System: A Virtual Tour

 

 

Twitter: @keypointlearn

Virtual Tour of the Australian Outback

Virtual Tour of the Australian Outback

Author: Dianne Hope

Blog post: Virtual Tour of the Australian Outback

Twitter: @DianneHope

 

Welcome to ACME Global

Welcome to ACME Global

Author: Jeff Kortenbosch

Website: Serious Learning

Twitter: @elearningjeff

 

 

Interactive Map

Interactive Map

 

Author: Simon Blair

Website: Simon Blair Consulting

Twitter: @SimonBlairTrain

 

Interactive Timeline

 

Interactive Timeline

 

 

Author: Simon Perkins

Website: e-volv

 

Welcome to My World

 

Welcome to My World

 

 

 

Author: Nick Russell

Website: Benchmark Learning

 

E-Learning Challenge #44: Virtual Tours in Online Training Posted Friday, July 25, 2014 at 5:54 PM

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In last week’s challenge, you shared creative ways to virtually introduce learners to key players in your organization. Your demos were amazing and included everything from standard org charts to creative meet the team examples.


In the spirit of virtual introductions, I thought we’d look at ways to introduce learners to locations using virtual tours. Virtual tours are a great way for learners to experience remote locations—just like they would if they were on a real-world field trip.

 

Before we jump into this week’s challenge, let’s look at some examples and basic considerations for designing virtual tours.


Simple Tours

One of the easiest tours to create involves a floor plan or cutaway shot of a location with buttons placed over key areas. Clicking each button loads a modal window containing information about the area. These are easy to build and a great starting point for virtual tours.

 

View Energy House

Maps and Photos

Using the floor plan concept, tours can use creative layouts to combine maps and photos. I really like the way the LA Times created this virtual home tour. Clicking each camera icon reveals a photo for that given location. Notice how the camera icon changes to indicate the direction the photo was taken.

 

View The single-family artist colony

 

Another option is to use the map only for reference and place the interactivity on the photos. In this example, users navigate by clicking through a series of photos while the map is visually updated to indicate the general area of the photo.

 

View A Wine Tour of Collio, by Vespa

Audio-based tours

Audio-based tours emphasize narration over fancy graphics and interaction. This example by Mother Jones shows how a photo combined with labeled graphics and audio narration can help learners virtually tour a prison cell.

 

View Life in the Hole: Inside a Solitary Cell

Tabbed navigation

Tabs are another way to highlight key areas of a location by using image-based thumbnails. Each tab can represent a different area and include different types of multimedia.

 

View A New Tower for The Times

3D Virtual World Tours

Virtual tours can be immersive experiences like those in Second Life and other virtual worlds. These are complex to produce and often difficult to navigate. Thankfully, we don’t need anything this complex to create engaging virtual tours!

View Elearning Guild Annual Gathering 2008

 

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to design a virtual tour of a real or fictional location. You can use any photos, illustrations, audio, and video you like to create your tour.

 

Examples wanted!

If you have some examples of virtual tours that you really like, please share them in the comments below.

 

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your interactive virtual tour.


Last week’s challenge

Before you go on tour this week, take a look at the virtual introductions your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge.

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you an tour-iffic week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson



Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. If you share your work on Twitter, try using #ELHchallenge to help others track your projects.

 

 

Recap: #43: Interactive Org Charts in E-Learning Posted Thursday, July 24, 2014 at 1:15 PM

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View E-Learning Challenge #43: Interactive Org Charts

 

Wow! What a great week of interactive org charts! Hands down, one of our best challenges ever!

 

First, a big thanks to first-time challengers Louisa, Josh, Nick, Ellen, DarlesaFarrah, Mel, Jennifer, and Justine, ! We’re so glad you’re here!

 

This week’s recap features interactive org charts, meet the team, who’s who, and other creative (and surprising) ideas for introducing people in e-learning.

 

New to the challenges?

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

 

If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure. And if you tweet your projects, try using #ELHChallenge so we can track the cool demos you share.

 

Thanks, E-Learning Heroes! You folks do awesome work!

 

 

Louisa Fricker

View Louisa's interactive org chart

 

View Louisa's interactive org chart

 

View Louisa's interactive org chart

 

Louisa kicked off the week’s challenge with a interactive org chart. Later, she shared a version of Meet the Team. She wasn’t finished. Inspired by Tim’s blurred background demo, Louisa came back with her own version. Thanks so much, Louisa!


 

David Glow

View David's interactive org chart

 

David shared a creative org chart featuring a clean and flat design theme.


 

Tim Slade

View Tim's interactive org chart

 

Tim went all out this week by sharing a free Storyline template for his interactive org chart. You’ll want to check out Tim’s blog post and time-lapse video to learn more about this awesome project.


 

Montse Anderson

View Montse's interactive org chart

 

View Montse's interactive org chart

 

View Montse's interactive org chart

 

Montse shared three creative examples for introducing key players in the organization.


 

Jeff Kortenbosch

View Jeff's interactive org chart

 

View Jeff's interactive org chart

 

Jeff shared a top-down perspective with his interactive org chart. Be sure to check out Jeff’s blog post and time-lapse video to learn how he pulled this project together. Thanks, Jeff!


 

 

Nicole Legault

View Nicole's interactive org chart

Nicole channeled some Office Space to create her interactive org chart.


 

Matt Guyan

View Matt's interactive org chart

Matt sported a trading cards theme to introduce corporate rugby players. Very cool, Matt!


 

Melissa Milloway

View Melissa's interactive org chart

 

View Melissa's interactive org chart

 

Melissa kicked things into high gear by sharing two creative examples for introducing key players. Lots of inspiration in these two demos!


 

Darlesa Cahoon

View Darlesa's interactive org chart

Darlesa shared a creative idea for working with illustrated characters. I might have to find a way to make this idea into its own challenge. Great demo, Darlesa!


 

Josh Stoner

View Josh's interactive org chart

It’s a jungle out there! What better way to tame office craziness than getting to know the animals? Great demo, Josh. Hope to see more of your in future challenges.


 

Nick Leffler

View Nick's interactive org chart

Nick jumped into his first challenge by sharing his version of interactive org charts and a free Storyline template. Thanks, Nick!


 

 

Lance Treloar

 

View Lance's interactive org chart

 

Lance shared a practical solution for managing large org charts. Great solution for something you can use in just about any org chart project. Thanks, Lance! 


 

 

 

Daniel Adeboye

View Daniel's interactive org chart

Daniel used PowerPoint to create his well-designed org chart. Check out Daniel’s blog post to learn more about his project and download the free PowerPoint template. Thanks, Daniel!


 

 

Tracy Parish

View Tracy's interactive org chart

 

Cool twist on this week’s challenge by using a seating chart example. Great job with the interactive elements for each sections. Check out Tracy’s blog post to learn more about her project and Atsumi’s fashion makeover.


 

 

Dianne Hope

View Dianne's interactive org chart

 

Dianne always shares such creative ideas and this week was no exception. Using a common photography shot, Dianne shared a fun way to introduce each team member. Check out Dianne’s blog post to learn more about her project!


 

 

Ellen Katz

View Ellen's interactive org chart

 

Ellen jumped into her first challenge with a clean and practical solution for interactive org charts. Welcome and great job, Ellen. Really hope to see you in future challenges.

 

 

 

Allison Nederveld

View Allison's interactive org chart

 

Great use of slide layers in this animated meet the authors demo. Well done, Allison!

 

 

 

 

Dan Sweigert

View Dan's interactive org chart

 

Dan proved he knows e-learning like the back of his hand in this hand-crafted org chart. For a first-hand account of how this came together, check out Dan’s blog post.

 

 

Paul Alders

View Paul's interactive org chart

 

Paul took a scenario-based approach to his creative org chart demo. Featuring 3D backgrounds and interactive conversations, this is a must-see project. Thanks, Paul!

 

 

Cary Glenn

View Cary's interactive org chart

 

Get to know who reports to Who in this sci-fi theme interaction. I love seeing Dr. Who brought into the challenges. We might need to find a way to make a full challenge around this. Thanks, Cary!

 

 

Nick Russell

View Nick's interactive org chart

 

Meet the family of beers in this animated org chart by community member Nick Russel. Nick always finds a unique "twist" on things and this project has plenty of twisting!

 

 

 

Jackie Van Nice

View Jackie's interactive org chart

Jackie shared an entertaining twist on “meet the team” by categorizing one’s job by level of importance. Thanks, Jackie!

 

 

 

 

Farrah Faruqul

View Farrah's interactive org chart

 

Farrah joined her first challenge with this creative family tree activity designed for little kids. Great concept, Farrah!


 

Richard Watson

View Richard's interactive org chart

 

View Richard's interactive org chart

 

Lots of cool ideas in Richard's org chart like the silhouette effect and drag-drop test mode. Check out Richard's blog post to learn more about his project. Great job, Richard!

 

 

Sophia Xu

View Sophia's interactive org chart

 

Nice use of variables for navigation in this branching org chart.

 

 

Bruce Graham

View Bruce's interactive org chart

 

Meet the international team and learn about their operations in this icon-based, interactive map.

 

 

Mel Gordon

View Mel's interactive org chart

 

Meet your e-learning team in this interactive org chart by Mel Gordon.

 

Jennifer Jakob

View Jennifer's Superheroes interactive org chart

Meet your superhero in this comic-themed org chart by Jennifer Jakob.


Profile: Jennifer Jakob

Website: Jennifer Jakob

 

Justine Swain

View Justine's interactive org chart

 

Come meet your new department in this branching org chart by first-time challenger Justine Swain.

 

Cecilia Bernal

Three basic layouts for “Meet the Team” examples

 

Cecilia shared a detailed and thoughtful summary of this week’s challenge entries. Thanks again for inspiring this week’s challenge, Cecelia!


 

 



 

Post written by David Anderson

 

E-Learning Pet Peeves Posted Tuesday, July 22, 2014 at 3:06 PM

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David, do you like e-learning?

 

I absolutely love e-learning. I love building e-learning. I love managing e-learning. And these days, I especially love helping people build their own e-learning. E-learning is perfect.

 

Perfect? 

 

Well, there might be one or two things I don’t miss about building courses. 

 

Like what? 

 

For one thing, the interminable QA cycles. No, I really don’t miss those. I lasted two, maybe three, rounds before getting restless and wishing the project would just end. Thankfully, those projects were rare.

 

So never-ending reviews are like lima beans?

 

Exactly! So what about you? Got any e-learning pet peeves?

 

E-Learning Challenge #43: Interactive Org Charts Posted Friday, July 18, 2014 at 2:44 PM

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As course designers, you’ve likely created a course or two (or more) that introduced learners to key people in your organization. Typical content includes topics like organizational structure, position rankings, leadership bios, and general contact information. New Hire 101, right?


I’ve tracked this type of interaction for a while, but never really thought of using it for a weekly challenge until I saw a Tweet from community member Cecilia Bernal. Cecilia created some fun examples using community resources. I really liked how she reworked the templates for her own Meet the Team interactions.

 

View Meet the Team: Examples for introducing people

 

Org charts, family trees, meet the team, and who’s who are essentially the same diagram. They show organizational structure and the relationships of people and positions. After seeing the Cecilia’s interactions grouped together, I knew this would make a fun challenge.


Before we jump into this week’s challenge, take a look at some variations of org charts. Consider how a similar model could work for your own projects.

 

 

Family Trees

Family trees also use a tree structure to represent relationships. They can resemble a real tree or use simple shapes to show hierarchy.

 

View North Korea's First Family

Labeled Graphics and Markers

Photographs of teams are another way to introduce a group of people. If there are a lot of people or the people are close together, try using interactive markers to identify each person.

 

View Meet the stars of Tech City

Working with Photographs

Sometimes there are so many players, it might make sense to forego the individual callouts and give learners a big picture view. I like the way this courtroom interactive toggles the callouts on and off:

 

View Take a look around the courtroom

Learning Games

Your interactions don’t have to be click-and-reveals. Try making a game out of your org chart by asking learners to identify each role or position. Here’s an example of an interactive who’s who designed for kids:

View Who’s Who in the Executive Branch

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to design an interactive graphic to introduce an organization’s team members or key players.

You can focus on corporate teams, sports teams, or something more playful like comic book characters.

 

Interaction ideas:

 

  • Meet the Team
  • Who's Who
  • Family Tree
  • Organization Charts

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your interactive who’s who or org chart.


Resources

Here are a few resources to get you started. If you know of any good interactions that would support this week's challenge, please include them in the comments section.


Blog posts:

Templates:

Last week’s challenge

Before you introduce yourself in this week’s meet-and-greet, take a look at the smartphone videos your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge.


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you an org-chart-tastic week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Related E-Learning Challenges

Post written by David Anderson

 

Recap #42: Smartphone Video Training Posted Thursday, July 17, 2014 at 1:38 PM

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E-Learning Challenge #42: Smartphone Video Training for Course Designers

 

 

Welcome to Recap Thursday. Okay, that’s only a working title but I wanted to give you an update on the new format for the e-learning challenges.


We’ve always tried to promote your challenge demos as much as possible. Whether on Twitter, Facebook, workshops, or Tom’s blog, the best way to thank you is by promoting the projects you share each week. And I think we’ve done a really good job getting the word out. The only thing missing was a visible way to showcase your weekly examples.


Starting today, I’ll post your challenge recaps on Thursdays. This gives me a larger space to showcase your challenge demos. I’ll still post a new e-learning challenge every Friday. And yes, previous challenges are always open. To date, no one’s participated in every challenge <hint>.

 

I hope you like the new format and that it helps more people discover the great work you're doing. Thanks and see you tomorrow, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Recap #42: E-Learning Challenge #42: Smartphone Video Training for Course Designers


Preparing a Parrot ArDrone for Flight

View Michael's smartphone video training example


The only thing quicker than recording smartphone training videos is assembling a Parrot ArDrone for its first flight. Great example of what's possible using a four-year-old phone and natural light.

 

How (NOT) to Parallel Park

View Tim's smartphone video training example


There’s a right way and a wrong way to parallel park. Tim shows you the… Maybe you should just see for yourself.

 

 

 

Duvets Dos and Dont’s

View Ashley's smartphone video training example


Inserting a duvet cover sounds simple right? Evidently there’s a right and wrong way to go about it.

 

 

 

How to Make a Simple Salt Scrub

View Melissa's smartphone video training example

 

You may never purchase expensive scrubs again after watching this practical video tutorial. Thanks, Melissa!

 

 

How to Make Coffee

View Dianne's smartphone video training example

 

Making coffee is easy. Recording videos with smartphones is easy. Creating smartphone training videos has some advantages and disadvantages which you can learn about in Dianne’s detailed recap. Thanks, Dianne!

 

 

 

Making Coffee with Nespresso

View Matt's smartphone video training example


Terrific example combining smartphone video with Storyline. You’ll want to review each step to gain access to behind-the-scene photos.

 

 

 

The Proper Way to Fold a Shirt

View Daniel's smartphone video training example

 

Shirt-folding just got a whole lot easier with this helpful video. Nice use of a simple title sequence to introduce the training video. 

 

 

 

Make Your Own Smartphone Mount

View Paul's smartphone video training example

 

You don’t need to spend a lot of money on fancy camera mounts. In this video Paul shows some practical ways to build your own mount and let us know how it works.

 

 

Protect Your Lunch from Greedy Office Workers

View Stephanie's smartphone video training example

 

Whether you work in an office or your home, this video offers some proven techniques for protecting your favorite snacks.

 

 

 

How to Bust Out of Your Home Office

View Jackie's smartphone video training example

 

There’s a lot we could say and probably shouldn’t say about this one. How about if we say this is worth watching several times!

 

How to Shoot Stop Motion Animation with a Smartphone

View Charles' smartphone video training example

 

Just how much work is it to create stop motion animation? Check out the smartphone video shared by community member Charles Hamper to learn what's involved in this popular animation technique.

 

 

 

Creating Training On the Go


View Allison's smartphone video training example

 

Smartphone video is easy, but it's even easier when your cat lends a hand paw. Great use of smartphone video to demonstrate how to fold an origami box. Allison also shares some good tips and lessons learned in her blog post. 



Making Guacamole with Master Chef Morgan


View Richard's smartphone video training example

 

This smartphone video project is full of flavorful tips and tricks! It also demonstrates how well Storyline and video (and guacamole) go together! Great project, Richard! 

 

 

 

 

 

Post written by David Anderson



More about the e-learning challenges

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.

 

E-Learning Challenge #42: Smartphone Video Training for Course Designers Posted Friday, July 11, 2014 at 12:34 AM

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In last week's challenge, we looked at a hypothetical training world where the only course design tools we had were pen and paper.

 

The samples you shared were nothing less than inspirational. When I shared your examples in my workshop yesterday, several people commented on how they imagined sketching a course could be faster than using images and text. And I totally agree.


So in the spirit of moving faster and looking at non-traditional e-learning tools, I thought it would be fun and educational to take a look at some ways course designers can use smartphones to create video courses and tutorials.


Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to record, edit, and publish a training video using your smartphone.

 

Choose a topic that allows you to record multiple videos for your project. The focus on this challenge is as much about editing as it is recording. 

 

Questions to answer

Whether or not you participate in this week's challenge, I'd love to get your feedback on the following questions. For those who participate, use the comments section or your own blog to answer the questions. This is a hot topic right now so course designers will be interested to hear about your projects.

 

  • What are some advantages and disadvantages to using smartphones for video training?
  • What types of content work well for this type of training?
  • Did you use your camera's built-in recorder or did you use a third party app? Talk about why you went with a different app.
  • What are some tips and best practices for creating smartphone training videos?
  • How long did it take you to create your video?


Possible video course ideas:

  • How to make a cup of coffee or tea

  • How to tie a shoe

  • How to give feedback to employees

  • How to parallel park

  • How to change a tire

Tools

You can use your smartphone’s built-in video camera to record and edit your videos. The emphasis is on using something portable and relatively inexpensive to create training videos.  If you use one or more custom apps, let us know what you used and how it worked for you.

 


Publishing your videos

You can embed your training videos in Articulate Studio or Articulate Storyline and share your project like any other course. Another option is to publish to a video hosting service like YouTube, Vimeo, or even Flickr. If you need help hosting your project, send me a DM through Heroes and I’ll help you out.


Resources

Here are a few articles on using smartphones to create video. After you publish and share your videos, please share some of your own tips and lessons learned.


The most important smartphone video tip you should know:

 

Vertical Video Syndrome - A PSA


Last week’s challenge

Before you shoot your masterpiece, take a look at the lo-tech, high-speed course designs your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:


  • Jeff Kortenbosch kicked off the week’s challenge by sketching a rapid response process for a fictional flood in the Netherlands. Featuring checklists for do's and dont's and a location map for affected areas, this is a well-conceived project.

  • Melissa Milloway followed with her own emergency response designs for a science lab accident. Sketches include a scenario intro, checklists, step-by-step, and prevention guide. Great job (and handwriting) Melissa!

  • Jackie Van Nice took things in a slightly different direction with her mixed-media abduction survival guide. There’s lots of ransom-iffic goodness going on in this organic and highly tactile “course” design.

  • Kimberly Bourque shared her analog-based hurricane survival guide featuring a locator map, contact numbers, and evacuation decision map. Awesome, Kimberly!

  • Lance Treloar shared a low-tech guide to surviving an alien invasion. It could happen, you know? I really like the way Lance used contrasting line weights to visually group the steps.

  • Richard Watson buzzed through this challenge with a colorful guide to surviving a killer bee invasion featuring FAQs, maps, how-tos, prevention, and removal steps, this is a “sweet” project. Richard took things up a notch by creating an interactive version of his project that caused even more buzz.

  • Daniel Adeboye sketched a colorful step-by-step guide for coping with test anxiety. Simple and elegant solution featuring background information, do's and dont's, recovery and prevention tips. Nicely done, Daniel!

  • Dianne Hope shared a three-step bush fire safety guide that features how-tos for preparing, acting, and surviving. Thanks, Dianne!

  • Allison Nederveld used Sharpies and watercolors to guide users through a hurricane disaster that features shelter news, FAQs and reminders, evacuation routes, and a safety checklist for dos and don’ts. Awesome project, Allison!

  • Hazel Brewer joined her first challenge (Yay!) with a highly relevant zombie survival guide. Featuring branching sticky notes and safety maps, this is another creative example of lo-fi course designs. Thanks for sharing, Hazel!

  • Dan Sweigert sketched a Survivorman-themed survival guide for surviving a cruise ship disaster. Featuring bold graphics and tips for shelter, food, and safety, these sketches are a great solution to pen and paper course design. Thanks, Dan!

More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a videotastic week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

 

E-Learning Challenge #41: Low-Tech, High-Speed Course Design Posted Friday, July 04, 2014 at 5:55 PM

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Shortly after the dust storms rolled in last night, most of Phoenix lost power for several hours. Power outages are rare in Phoenix, but they can be scary for cats, dogs, and 5-yr olds. To keep our kid’s mind focused on happy thoughts, we gathered around our candle-lit table and made flower fairies.

 

Back to the basics

While we worked by candlelight, I remembered a story I’d read about the 2011 Japan earthquake and how a town’s newspaper used pen and paper to manually print news of the disaster, shelter information, and general support efforts.

 

“For six consecutive days after the twin disasters, reporters used flashlights and marker pens to write their stories on poster-size paper and posted the ‘newspapers’ at the entrances of relief centers around the city. Six staff members collected stories, while three spent an hour and a half each day writing the newspapers by hand.” Newseum


View the video story at Newseum

 

One reason I think I like this story so much is that it’s a great reminder that technology is only part of the answer. It also highlights the speed at which designers can move when they aren’t focused on technology or any single solution.

 

Power’s out? Pen and paper are in. Back to work everyone!

 

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to create an emergency-response course using pen and paper.


Select a news story or training course that focuses on a disaster or emergency event and create a 3-5 slide course to help learners navigate the event. Because you’re creating everything by hand, you’ll really need to focus on the basics.

 

Consider adding one or more of the following elements:

  • Information - What happened and what do your learners need to know?

  • Checklists - Can you provide steps or procedures for your learners to follow?

  • Resources - Are there any additional resources available to learners?

Note: This challenge is not about prototyping. This one’s all about designing an analog course using basic drawing tools. 

 

Tools

You can use crayons, markers, pencils, or any non-digital drawing tools to create your mini-course. You can digitize your handwritten slides any way you like.


Suggested ways to share your images:


Last week’s challenge

Before you pencil in some time for this week’s challenge, take a look at the instructional design quizzes your fellow community members shared in last week’s challenge:


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a poster-riffic week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.



 

Recap #39: E-Learning Interviews with the Articulate Community Posted Saturday, June 28, 2014 at 3:27 AM

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Last week we asked industry experts (that’s you!) to share their opinions about everything from designing and evaluating e-learning to mobile development to the future of e-learning. 

 

As usual, you guys rocked this challenge. I seriously think this is my favorite challenge. I really appreciate all the time you put into recording your interviews. Thank you.

 

For those who missed the podcast challenge, you’ll find the full interviews below. Hope you enjoy listening to the podcasts, and here’s reminding you that you that the e-learning challenges are always open. If you feel like recording your own interview, we’ll update both the recap post and this highlights post to feature your podcast.

 

 

 

Tim Slade

Profile: Tim Slade

Website: Tim Slade

Twitter: @sladetim

 

 

Allison Nederveld

Profile: Allison Nederveld

Website: Allison B. Nederveld

Twitter: @abnederveld

 

 

Ashley Chiasson

Profile: Ashley Chiasson

Website: Ashley Chiasson

Twitter: @amdchiasson

 

 

Nick Russell

Profile: Nick Russell

Website: Benchmark Learning

 

 

 

Dan Sweigert

Profile: Dan Sweigert

Website: E-Learning With Dan

Twitter: @elearningwdan

 

 

 

 

Nicholas Sargent

Profile: Nicholas Sargent

Website: Healthy Connections Medicaid

 

 


Dana Dutiel

Profile: Dana Dutiel

 

 

 

Jackie Van Nice

Profile: Jackie Van Nice

Website: Jackie Van Nice

Twitter: @JackieTrains

 

 

 

 

Nancy Woinoski

Profile: Nancy Woinoski

Website: Pinched Head

Twitter: @pinchedhead

 

 

 

Richard Watson

Profile: Richard Watson

Website: Bridgehill Learning

Twitter: @bridgehillLS

 

 

 

Rebecca Fleisch Cordeiro

Profile: Rebecca Fleisch Cordeiro

Website: eLearning eLements

Twitter: @refco27

 

 

 

 

Daniel Adeboye

Profile: Daniel Adeboye

Website: All4Krist

 

 

 

Daniel Brigham

Profile: Daniel Brigham

Website: Brigham Communications

Twitter: @danielbrigham

 

 

 

Jeff Kortenbosch

Profile: Jeff Kortenbosch

Website: Serious Learning

Twitter: @elearningjeff

 

 

 

Paul Alders

Profile: Paul Alders

Website: Eyespirations

Twitter: @PaulAlders