E-Learning Challenge: Creative Resume Templates for E-Learning Portfolios Posted yesterday at 1:36 PM

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Happy Friday, E-Learning Heroes!


Last week you visually explained what you do as course designers. This week, it’s time to show what you’ve done as course designers.


How do you show your work? In a portfolio, of course. But this time, use your same tools for building learning projects and let your creativity run free. Seriously! It’s your time to showcase your skills with the tools you use every day.


I get it. Most course designers don’t like to think about portfolios. Saying “look at what I did” probably isn’t in your DNA. But portfolios are a lot like flossing teeth. You never really know how important it is until it’s too late.


Last month I posted a forum thread asking users to share their e-learning portfolios. Some folks had their portfolios ready, others had to scramble. This week, Jackie Van Nice shared some creative resume ideas and asked the community if anyone had built their portfolios or resumes using Storyline. Some lively discussions followed around topics like: when to use interactive resumes, what will recruiters think, and what types of jobs are best suited for non-standard resumes.


An interactive portfolio should move beyond the paper resume. It’s your opportunity to create excitement and lengthen the time recruiters view your e-learning portfolio.

 

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to design an interactive resume or portfolio showcasing your e-learning work. You can show all your work or highlight only a couple of your favorite projects.


Your interactive resume can be courses, excerpts from courses, screenshots, word docs, screencasts, or anything else you want to feature.


As always, you can share your examples in the comments below as well as on your own blog. Need someone to help upload your files? I’m happy to host your files for you on Articulate’s servers.


Bonus: Take the challenge up a notch by sharing a template version of your interactive resume that others can use. I’ll create a new blog post to highlight the templates and promote everyone who shares.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your interactive resume.


Resources

To help you get started, check out some of the websites your fellow community members built using Articulate software.


Last week’s challenge


Before you run off and show us what you’ve done, check out these visual explanations of what people do in e-learning:



More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a showcase week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

E-Learning Challenge: What Do E-Learning Designers Really Do? Posted Friday, April 11, 2014 at 5:53 PM

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Have you ever tried explaining what you do to your friends or parents? Anyone? Chances are you were met with a blank or quizzical look.


While most jobs can be tough to explain to people outside your industry, e-learning design has to be one of the most challenging jobs to explain. The industry is relatively new and requires designers to juggle a variety of skills from writing to design to project management to counselling.


For anyone who’s struggled to explain their occupation, the “What People Think I Do / What I Really Do” is the visual elevator pitch you've been looking for. 

 

Using a series of panels, you tell a visual story about the preconceptions outsiders have about our industry. You’ve likely seen one or more versions of this visual communication meme. Here’s one of my favorites:

 


There isn’t a strict format you have to follow, the panels typically include panels for:


  • What my friends think I do

  • What my mom thinks I do

  • What society thinks I do

  • What my boss thinks I do

  • What I think I do

  • What I actually do

In some ways, this meme is similar to the photo collage challenge you did a couple weeks back. The biggest difference is the meme is focused around explaining what your occupation while the photo collage was more open-ended.


Now, it’s possible what people think you do and what you really do are exactly the same:

 

Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to design a visual chart using the “What People Think I Do / What I really Do” meme.  You can choose any job role you like: instructional designer, course designer, Super Hero, or any other title that interests you.


Projects can be static images, or you can try something more interactive like video or animation. Whatever you decide to do, just have fun with it! I’ll start a Pinterest board like I did for your instructional design tips to showcase your examples.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your visual chart.


Resources

Here’s a free PowerPoint template to help you get started:

 

Blogs and articles

Last week’s challenge


Before you start telling everyone what you really do, check out what your community members did in last week’s summary slide challenge:


More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a great week—doing whatever it is you do—E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson


______________________________________________________________________________


Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

E-Learning Challenge: Summary and Resource Slides in Online Courses Posted Friday, April 04, 2014 at 4:36 PM

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One of the oft-neglected opportunities in e-learning is the course summary slide. Many course designers spend the bulk of their time designing content and activities—and then forget to consider how to support learners after the course. In extreme cases, we’ve heard of learners opening help tickets to find out how to even close out of the course.


A few weeks ago Nicole posted some great tips along with a starter template to help course designers design better summary slides. And when community member Eric Isaksson wrote me last week to suggest summary slides as an e-learning challenge, I knew that this would make a great challenge!


Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to design an e-learning conclusion or summary slide.


You can focus your entry on instructions for closing the course, job aids to support the course, or even additional resources for learners to continue learning.


This week’s challenge is all about design ideas for presenting summary slides and resources. You don’t need to build out a working interaction—but I know many of you will, and that’s totally cool, too.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your e-learning summary screen.


Resources

Last week’s challenge


Before you conclude this week’s challenge, check out the summary of last week's Top 10 challenge:



More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a week worth summarizing, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

E-Learning Challenge: Top 10 Things Learners Need to Know About Storyline Posted Friday, March 28, 2014 at 4:05 PM

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At least once a week, someone asks me to recommend a list of “getting started” tutorials and demos. Sometimes it’s for a group of users who just purchased our software, and other times it’s for experienced users looking to take their skills to the next level.


In each case, the time it takes me to pull a list together can vary from a few minutes to… a while, to say the least. While my work affords me the benefit of knowing what resources are available, the curation part can still take time depending on how much I know about the users and their needs. It’s not helpful for users if I send 50+ tutorials and let them sort through them.

 

One of the fun things about Top 10 lists is that they're rarely identical. Curation is personal and that's why I thought it would make a great weekly challenge.


Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to put together a Top 10 list of “getting started” tutorials for any area of Storyline development you like.


Your Top 10 can target new or experienced users, and you can narrow your list any way you like. Just imagine you've been asked to help someone with a Top 10 list of tutorials. What would you share?


Note: Your list doesn't have to include software-specific resources. If you’re curating a list on scenarios in Storyline, you may want to include an article on scenario models or giving feedback in scenarios.

 

Here are some ideas to get you started:


  • Top 10 Things You Should Know to Build a Storyline Course

  • Top 10 Things New Users Need to Know About Storyline

  • Top 10 Things You Should Know About Scenarios in Storyline

  • Top 10 Getting Started Tutorials for Working with Audio in Storyline

  • Top 10 Storyline Tutorials for Working with Multimedia

  • Top 10 Ways to Create Your Own Graphics in Storyline

  • Top 10 Creative Ideas for Building Interactive Scenarios in Storyline

  • Top 10 Tutorials for Total Newbies

  • Top 10 Articulate Guru Skills You Wish You Had

  • Top 10 Production Tips for Working in Articulate Storyline

 

Tools

You can use any of Articulate’s tutorials and resources, as well as anything you've created or discovered on other sites.


Last week’s challenge

Before you begin listing your favorite tutorials, take a moment to check out the amazing ideas shared in last week’s photo collage challenge:



More about the e-learning  challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Wishing you a Top 10 week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

E-Learning Challenge: Visual Storytelling with Photo Collages Posted Friday, March 21, 2014 at 9:51 PM

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Looking to move from a screen full of bullets to creating visual stories? Then you’ll love the ideas shared in Tom’s post on using photo collages to build interactive stories.


Working from simple panel layouts, the photo collage is a simple way to work with image-driven stories and interactions.


In Tom’s example, he used a symmetrical layout similar to many comic book designs. But that’s just one possibility. Another option is to work from a less structured layout:

 

A quick search in your favorite stock photo site returns a variety of photo collage styles and possibilities. Here are two more ideas:

 

I really like this visual approach to storytelling and and think it’ll make a great e-learning challenge.


Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to create an interactive story around a photo collage. You can use placeholder photos and graphics, or rework an existing project into a photo collage.


You can design your interactive story around any topic you like. Not sure where to begin?

 

Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Design your story around a common problem or challenge

  • Rework an existing scenario or interaction using a photo collage

  • Use the built-in characters (illustrated and photographic) which include multiple expressions and poses

  • Map collages are ideal for interactive org charts or customer profiles

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, or PowerPoint to build your interactive story.


Resources

Last week’s challenge

Before you begin creating your interactive story collages, take a moment to check out the amazing ideas shared in last week’s interactive screenshot challenge:



More about the e-learning challenges:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Here’s wishing you an interactive week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

E-Learning Challenge: Interactive Screenshots for Online Training Posted Friday, March 14, 2014 at 6:53 PM

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To everyone who shared a demo, template, or idea in one or more of the challenges, I want to say a huge heartfelt “thank you.” The amount of creativity and generosity in this community is truly amazing.


At the two-day workshop Tom and I did this week in Phoenix, I was reminded that a lot of you create online training around documents, charts, and, of course, software systems. After talking with some of the folks who attended, I realized we should do more around this important category of e-learning.


In a recent challenge, we looked at screencasting and software simulations, which are the two most common methods for technical training. But sometimes a screencast or simulation is overkill for orienting your learners with an application’s UI or features.


That’s where interactive screenshots come in. They’re easy to build, and let learners quickly drill down into the details for a particular menu or panel. In my opinion, they’re a must for your e-learning toolkit.


Challenge of the week

This week, your challenge is to create an interactive screenshot for an application’s UI or specific features.

Here are a few things to consider when planning your projects:

  • How much of the application will you show? How much do you need to show?

  • How will learners pull the information? Hover? Click? Drag?

  • How can you work additional resources, videos, or practice opportunities into the detailed views?

  • How will learners return to the original screenshot?

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Studio, or PowerPoint to build your demos.


Resources

Sharing your projects

You can share your files in the comments section below, the E-Learning Heroes forums, or on your personal blog. If you post on your own blog, include a link in the comments section below.

I really like how Gem Henderson and Jackie Van Nice write a short post for each of their demos.


The posts give us some insights into their design process. Anyway, if you’re thinking of blogging but not sure what to write about, the challenges are a great place to start.


Note:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Here’s wishing you an interactive week, E-Learning Heroes!

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.

 

Challenge Recap: 24 Weeks of E-Learning Examples Posted Friday, March 07, 2014 at 2:00 PM

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Congratulations on rocking another 12 weeks of e-learning challenges.


Instead of doing a challenge this week, I thought it would be a great time to look back at the amazing examples you guys shared over the past three months. Take the week to go through the projects, or use the time to catch up on a challenge or two you missed.


I feel incredibly fortunate to be part of this community. It's not easy to show and share one's work. That's true for newbies as well as course-designing gurus. But you guys take that risk each week and the community rewards your efforts with feedback, support, and new friendships.


About the challenges

Miss a challenge?

Challenges are always open—there's never a deadline to submit an idea. If you missed a challenge, just add your demo to the comments and we'll update the weekly recap and the quarterly recap to include your samples. The best way we know how to thank you for sharing is by promoting what you do.


Got an idea for a challenge?

I'm always taking ideas for future challenges. I think our editorial calendar is filled through June, but I can always move things around for the right challenge. If you have an idea for a challenge, I definitely want to hear it.


Looking for previous challenges?

You can find the first 12 challenges in this recap post.

 

Here are summaries and links to the latest 12 weekly challenges:


Give Your Quiz Results Slides a Makeover

 

 

Create a Radiant Template with Pantone’s Color of the Year

 

 

Creating Custom Drag-and-Drop E-Learning Interactions

 

 

Using Job Aids in E-Learning


 

 

Using Characters in E-Learning

 

Screencasts and Software Simulations in Online Training

 

Ask Your Learners to Prove They’re Learning

 


Beyond the Basic Drag-and-Drop Interaction

 

Olympic-Themed E-Learning Template

 

 

Decision Map to Branching Scenarios

 

 

 

 

Create a Simple E-Learning Game

 

Instructional Design Tips That Really Pop

You can view everyone’s poster designs on Pinterest.


 

E-Learning Template: Web Style Tabs Interaction Posted Wednesday, March 05, 2014 at 10:55 AM

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Hey everyone. I wanted to kick off the day with an e-learning template created by Articulate Super Hero Phil Mayor.

 

At first glance, this seems like a regular tabs interaction. But wait, there's more!

 

Beyond the flat design, this tabs interaction features nifty button options that include built-in Twitter and email options so your learners can easily share your customized version of the template.

 

Check out the quick tutorial Phil put together to learn more about the template and how you can adapt it to your own projects.

 

Download: Web style tabs interaction

 

Phil Mayor is a an imaginative and award-winning instructional designer who builds some amazing e-learning projects. Learn more about Phil on his personal site, E-Learning Heroes, or follow him on Twitter.

 

 

Post written by David Anderson

 

Interactive Conversations in Articulate Storyline Posted Tuesday, March 04, 2014 at 11:17 AM

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How many of you build e-learning scenarios? I think we all have at some point, right? Well, if you're like me, then you're always looking for a new or creative way to present conversations between two or more characters.

 

Here's a scenario idea shared by community member Mayra Aixa Villar that combines characters, chat boxes, and Storyline's scrolling panel. You gotta see it to believe it! 

 

Mayra first shared this tip on her Creative Design of Learning Experiences blog. You can also find Mayra on Twitter, YouTube, and Scoop.it!

 

Thank, Mayra!

 

 

 

 

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Post written by David Anderson

 

Two Ways to Emphasize Part of a Graphic Posted Sunday, March 02, 2014 at 9:00 PM

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We got a good question via Twitter last week, and I thought I'd post the solutions Tom and I shared with Nick.

 

First, here's the Tweet for help:

 

You can emphasize a section of text or an image using several techniques. Below are the solutions we shared:

 

Create a Lightbox Effect on a Slide in Articulate Storyline

In this technique, we format the background with the original graphic. To create the emphasis effect, we add another shape and fill that shape with the background graphic.

 

 

Quick Way to Emphasize Part of an Image in Articulate Storyline (and PowerPoint)

In this technique, we use Storyline's built-in image formatting combined with the crop tool to emphasize part of the graphic.

 

 

 

 

Update: Here's another idea shared by Articulate Super Hero Steve Flowers:

 

 

 

Can you think of another technique? Share your ideas in the comments below.

 

 

 

 

Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter. And don’t forget to post your questions and comments in the forums! We’re here to help.

 

E-Learning Challenge: Instructional Design Tips That Really Pop Posted Friday, February 28, 2014 at 4:27 PM

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Happy Friday, E-Learning Heroes!


I’m so impressed with the amazing demos, games, and e-learning templates you’ve cranked out over the past few weeks. Really inventive work in so little time! For this week, I think we’ve earned a little breather with a less intensive design workout.


One of the things I’ve been interested in lately is typography posters—you know, those fun posters that feature playful design quotes set in creative typography. They’re a great way to share tips or common pitfalls in a more engaging and shareable format than boring old bullet lists.

 


Maybe you’ve heard that the e-learning industry loves its tips and rules of thumb... And we all have our go-to favorite tip, piece of advice, or rule of thumb we love to spring on newbies.

 

Considering how often we’re asked “What does an instructional designer need to know?”, I thought a typography exercise would be a fun way to communicate visually our favorite tips with new users.

 



This week’s challenge

This week your challenge is to design a poster around your favorite education or instructional design quote. Your quote can be serious, playful, or even a little snarky. The text is simply the vehicle for your favorite tip designed as a typography poster.


When you post your example, please include the actual quote you used along with links to your web site, Twitter, or other social media sites. It helps us promote you and your work while hopefully connecting you with other community members.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio, PowerPoint, Word, or any graphics program to create your design poster.


Resources

Need some inspiration? Check out the following sites for education quotes and typography design inspiration.

 

What do e-learning designers need to know?

Forum threads

Instructional design quotes

Typography Posters

Free fonts

Last week’s e-learning challenge

To help you find your voice for this week’s challenge, take a look at the highlights from last week’s e-learning games challenge:


Did you know?

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Have a quotable week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________


 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

E-Learning Challenge: Create a Simple E-Learning Game Posted Friday, February 21, 2014 at 5:37 PM

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View the e-learning game

 

I know there are a lot of folks in the community who are looking to build games in Storyline, or who just want to know more about using games in e-learning. If either sounds like you, then you’ll love this week’s challenge.


This week we’re going to look at transforming a quiz into a simple e-learning game.


In reality, these types of games are more like glorified progress meters than high-production games. But they’re fun for learners to take, and just as much for course designers to build. 


Choose a game theme

What type of game do you want? One option for game themes is to align the game to the rest of your course content. Think of a new hire course where the objective is to collect important documents from different departments. Maybe you browse the aisles of your company “store” and fill your cart with your departmental items. Another option is to choose something more off-the-wall like an adventure game or a treasure hunting scenario.


Backgrounds create context

Once you’ve found a theme, the next step is to head over to your favorite stock photo site for some background graphics that match your theme.  Because the background graphic is the largest slide object, it sets the context for your e-learning game.

 


 

Select the style of game

How do you want your learners to move through the game? Two common ways include:


Linear: Learners follow a path of challenge questions. Each time the learner answers correctly, the learner moves forward along the path. Markers along the path are updated visually to indicate correct and incorrect choices.


Non-linear: Learners move through the game by choosing one of the markers or buttons placed around the game board. Clicking a marker loads a new challenge question. After answering the question, the learner is returned to the game board and the marker is updated visually to reflect a correct or incorrect answer.


Building the quiz

As with most interactions in Storyline, you have multiple options for how you structure your game. Depending on your goals, you’ll find one method fits better than the other. You essentially have two ways to build your file:


Single slide

Everything is built on a single slide. This is an efficient way to structure your file because it enables you to easily share your final game template. Because all quiz questions are built on slide layers, Storyline’s built-in quiz results options won’t be available to track and report the game scores.


Separate slides

The other option is to build your questions as separate slides. Using your game board as your home slide, each marker loads a quiz question either as a lightbox slide or jumps the learner to the new slide. After completing the question, the learner is returned to the home slide where the marker is updated to reflect the learner’s correct or incorrect answer.


This week’s challenge

This week your challenge is to build a simple e-learning game in either Storyline or Quizmaker.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline or Articulate Quizmaker to create your e-learning game.

 

To get you started, take a look at this e-learning game from our downloads gallery.


Last week’s e-learning challenge

To help you find a game plan for this week’s challenge, take a look at the highlights from last week’s branching scenarios challenge:


Note:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Get your game on this week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

E-Learning Challenge: Decision Map to Branching Scenarios Posted Friday, February 14, 2014 at 7:57 PM

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Remember last year’s e-learning challenge, where we looked at transforming static infographics into interactive infographics? You guys came up with some amazing examples making that one of our most popular challenges.


Last week, an infographic from Inc.com resurfaced. The infographic is really one large simulation map to help managers determine their leadership style.

 

View the infographic

 

There’s even an interactive version of the same infographic.

 

View interactive infographic

 

Since both of these infographics are similar to the branching scenarios we build in e-learning, they make the perfect starting point for a weekly challenge!


This week’s challenge

This week your challenge is to build a branching interaction based on the What Kind of Leader Are You? infographic.


This challenge is all about interpreting an existing simulation map and bringing it to life. Use whatever design style you like. This can include using characters, boxes and arrows, LOL Cats or anything else you can dream up. We just want to see what you can come up with using the infographic as a starting point.


Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio ’09, Articulate Studio ’13, or PowerPoint to create your branching simulation.


Resources

Here are some scenario resources to help you get started:


Blog posts

Forum discussions

Tutorials

Sharing your examples:

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project. The comments section allows links but not attachments. If you have a question or want to share your source files, you should use the forums.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published source file. You can also attach your project files if you’d like some help or feedback.

  • Personal blog: Post your published example on your own blog and place a link in the comments below.

Last week's e-learning challenge

 

To help you find the critical path for this week’s branching challenge, take a look at the highlights from last week’s e-learning games:


Note:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


It’s your week to branch out, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

______________________________________________________________________________

 

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

 

E-Learning Challenge: Design an Olympic-Themed E-Learning Template Posted Friday, February 07, 2014 at 6:13 PM

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Happy Friday, e-learning Olympians! With the opening ceremonies of the 2014 Winter Olympics today, we’re jumping into the spirit of the games with our own e-learning challenge. You’ve trained so long for this moment—now, it’s your turn go for gold.

 

This week’s challenge

This week your challenge is to design an e-learning template for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. You can design a general template for the Winter Olympics, or focus your template around a specific country or event.


Your goal should be to build out at least five slides for your template:

  • Cover slide

  • Objectives slide

  • Quiz slide

  • Interaction slide (tabs, timeline, etc.)

  • Scenario slide

Alternative challenge:

Keeping with the sports theme, you can also celebrate the Super Bowl champions with a Seattle Seahawks-inspired design template. You know Tom will appreciate seeing what you come up with.

 

Tools

You can use Articulate Storyline, Articulate Studio ’09, Articulate Studio ’13, or PowerPoint to create your Olympic template.


Resources

Tom has some great posts on finding design inspiration, creating starter templates and using websites to get started. If you read only one post, I’d check out the post on creating an e-learning template. It outlines the most common slide designs found in courses.


Sharing your examples:

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published project. The comments section allows links but not attachments. If you have a question or want to share your source files, you should use the forums.

  • Forums: Create your own thread in our E-Learning Heroes forums and share a link to your published source file. You can also attach your project files if you’d like some help or feedback.

  • Personal blog: Post your published example on your own blog and place a link in the comments below.

 

Last week’s e-learning challenge


To help you limber up for this week’s e-learning events, check out the freestyle examples shared in last week’s drag-and-drop challenge:


Note:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Have a gold-medal week, E-Learning Heroes!


Post written by David Anderson

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Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.


 

E-Learning Challenge: Beyond the Basic Drag-and-Drop Interaction Posted Friday, January 31, 2014 at 6:18 PM

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In this week’s blog post, Tom shared great tips for crafting good drag & drop interactions. That post must have ignited a lot of ideas because we were delightfully inundated with drag-and-drop questions this week at Learning Technologies in London.

 

One of the hot questions was how to create drag-and-drop interactions for non-quizzing activities. Here are a few examples we shared about this at the conference:


Drag-and-drop to reveal

This fun example demonstrates a novel way to use drag-and-drop to reveal hidden objects or messages.


Modeled after a scratch-and-win lottery ticket, this drag-and-drop interaction leans on Storyline’s variables to count the number of times the quarter is dragged over an object.

 

View the drag-and-drop example

 

Drag-and-drop to complete

Using multiple objects, learners drag objects to complete an optical illusion puzzle. How can this type of game be applied to procedural training?

 

View the drag-and-drop example

Drag-and-drop to trigger a response

In this example, learners are asked to drag the microphone to each candidate to hear a response.

 

View the drag-and-drop example

Challenge of the week

This week your challenge is to build a drag-and-drop interaction based on one of the three examples above.


Don’t have time to put an activity together? No problem. Just share some ideas for ways to use drag-and-drop in non-quizzing activities. We’ll pull the ideas together and use them for a future challenge!

 

Resources and templates

To help you get started, check out these drag-and-drop resources and tutorials:


Blogs and discussions:

Tutorials:

Demos & templates:

 

Post written by David Anderson

 


 

Last week’s e-learning challenge


Before you drag-and-drop your way to e-learning stardom, check out the creative ways your fellow community members asked learners to prove they were learning:


Note:

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. We’ll feature your work and provide feedback if you request it.


Hope your week is drag-and-drop-tastic, E-Learning Heroes!

______________________________________________________________________________

Even if you’re using a trial version of Studio ’13 or Storyline, you can absolutely publish your challenge files. Just sign up for a fully functional, free 30-day trial, and have at it. And remember to post your questions and comments in the forums; we're here to help. For more e-learning tips, examples, and downloads, follow us on Twitter.