Share Your Classic (E-Learning) Board Games #137

E-Learning Board Games #137: Challenge | Recap

One of the most important goals of e-learning is helping learners acquire and apply new skills and knowledge.

Designing effective e-learning requires practice and being able to adapt your learning designs to fit your learners. And other times, it’s just about finding ways to make the course feel less like a course and more like a game.

This week, we’re diggin’ in the crates and dusting off our favorite childhood board games. Why? Because those classic board games are the inspiration behind this week’s challenge.

We’ve seen some great examples of classic board games redesigned as e-learning courses. Here are a few examples to help you get started:

Battleship

Hunt, seek, sink, and win in the classic combat game. Originally a pencil and paper game, Battleship remains one of the most popular board games today.

Here’s a great example of how a classic game can be reimagined as an e-learning game. The source file is provided so you can peek under the hood hull.

Battleship

View the game | Download

Chutes and Ladders

Clever use of JavaScript to randomize the rolling of dice in this game by Darren Heath.

Chutes and Ladders

View the game | Learn more

Operation

Cool use of drag-and-drop in this mobile-version of Operation by Linda Lorenzetti.

Operation

View the game | Learn more

Challenge of the Week

This week, your challenge is to design a short game or interaction based on a popular board game.

Rules: Challenges, like board games, wouldn’t be fun without a few rules. Actually, we only have one rule this week:  New challenge entries only.

We’ve hosted six, game-based challenges over the past few years and the entries were amazing. To keep the awesomeness going, please share a new game-based example in this challenge.

Bonus: If your challenge entry fits in a previous challenge, you’re welcome to share it. This way you get more mileage out of your work. See? I’m not a total meanie!

Resources

Hands down, game-based challenges are some of our most popular challenges. If you want to know what’s possible with e-learning games, check out the previous challenges and recaps.

Last Week’s Challenge:

Before you roll the dice in this week’s challenge, check out the incredible simulations your fellow course designers shared in last week’s Red Bead Experiment challenge:

Deming

Deming's Red Bead Experiment #136: Challenge | Recap

Wishing you a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

New to the E-Learning Challenges?

The weekly e-learning challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

189 Comments
Maija Perfiljeva
Maija Perfiljeva
Maija Perfiljeva
David Anderson
Henk Corporaal

This is my first ever contribution to the E-learning Challenges: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/51948927/Yahtzee/story.html It's the famous game YAHTZEE (I know, not exactly a board game but I thought it should count...) BE CAREFUL to make sure to enter a score as soon as you click any of the score fields. Because if you change your mind after selecting a score field the game will return a 'NaN'. (This is the only bug that I know of and my sense is this is a Articulate software issue. Would love to hear people's feedback on this matter if there's a way to solve it...) What's your best score? --- UPDATE: --- The above link contains the updated version of the game with the 'NaN' issue resolved. BIG THANKS to Maija for helping out! In case anyone is interested in the .st... Expand

Maija Perfiljeva
Maija Perfiljeva
Joanne Chen
Henk Corporaal
Punam Parab
Bridget Brown

CHESS ANYONE?? https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BzER4J1zCaZ-LUotTXBueVNTN2M This is my first challenge entry! Just happy I had something that I was currently working on! The task at hand was a boring one. Describe roles and responsibilities in the global risk organization of a Fortune 500 company. My mind went to games like “Risk” and “Chess.” “Risk” seemed WAY too hard to breakdown, but chess allows the learner to discover on their own and feel as if they are making progress as the pieces build in a 2D and flat design way. I created the chess board in PowerPoint and used variables that call to both the chess board (TOC) and the master slide. While there is a lot of clicking in the sample file, I was careful to put the pieces in realistic positions. Furthermore, our Risk o... Expand

ieva swanson
Tania Vercoelen
Maija Perfiljeva
Allison Goldthorpe