28 Replies
David Moreno

Hi Caron,

I work for a Localization/Translation company and we have experience translating Storyline files in more than 30 languages.

Here is our blog about the services that we offer for ELearning projects: (http://www.elearning-localization.com/)

I will be happy to give you a hand here.

Email: david.moreno@andovar.com  Skype: davidm.andovar

Wish you a great day,

David M

David Moreno

Are you translating courses developed in Articulate Rise? Here's some guidance...

After receiving a few inquiries about the localization of courses developed in Articulate Rise, we put together a blog post explaining the process and workarounds needed, while Articulate are "working on a translation feature".

Here's the Blog: Articulate Rise Localization

Feel free to ask any questions.

David Moreno

david.moreno@andovar.com

Leslie McKerchie

Great news everyone!

We released a new feature in Rise today:

New: You can now localize a Rise course into other languages. Export text to an XLIFF file, translate it, then import it back into Rise with formatting intact.

Because Rise is a web app, new features and fixes are immediately available, though you might need to export a Rise course again to update existing published output with a new feature or bug fix.

Kelly shared an announcement you can check out here and our Rise Version history can always be found right here.

Dario Dabbicco

Thank you very much Articulate guys, but I have one question for the community: from what I see, Rise is exporting the XLIFF file with all the html tags embedded, as <p>, <strong> and so on. Using a free XLIFF editor, the tags are still showing in the translation panel, so even copy and pasting from an existing translation turns out to be a very time-consuming and confusing process... this is the kind of content i am getting (where you read "text", is supposed to be the content of the Rise course, that I deleted for brevity):

Am I missing something? How did you get to solve this with common XLIFF editors?

<p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">text <strong>text</strong> text <strong></strong> text <strong>text</strong> 
text
Irina Poloubessov

Dear Leslie,
Would that be possible to export from Rise too in .doc format for localization, and not only in Xliff?
E.g. in Storyline it is possible to use both formats, and it would be much easier (not requiring special software, avoiding the bottleneck of too few people being able to help with translation) - if we could also from Rise export in Word, with "Include "Original Text" column for reference" .
Thank you very much!

Irina Poloubessov

Dear Leslie,
Thank you very much,
However I did mean the export in Doc implemented for Rise just as in Storyline for translation, not for printing - this is so very convenient to export in .doc for localization than in Xliff only, much more people can do the work. It would be great if Rise could follow the same localization settings as Storyline, namely the export for translation in Doc document, with a column for original language and another - for translation. Thank you very much!

Erin Walker

I would also like to +1 for the exporting a translation grid from Rise. My dept has always used the translation grid in Storyline and now in order to take advantage of Rise we need to do research into xliff translation tools. 

To get started on this search, you have any suggestions on web-based xliff translation tools? Thanks!

Dan Rowson

Hi all,

new to Rise and absolutely loving it but hit my first hurdle with a client.

We have the course 99% complete in English but they now tell me it must be available in French and German too. The issue is that they want a single course and the user selects their language when they start the course. 

Can this be done in Rise? At present all I seem to be able to do is create a duplicate which means I will need to supply them with 3 courses

Thanks

Dan

Suzy Dopson

Hi Leslie, we would also love to be able to export the text into WORD DOC for translation, with the reference columns available. The XLIFF files is much more difficult to use, and if there is any formatting in the text, it all shows in the file. we got charged a lot more for translating XLIFF files than what we would with a word document.

Ashley Terwilliger

Hi Zuzka, 

With Rise we added XLIFF translation as it's an industry standard for localization, and there are many free and premium tools for working with XLIFF files (Here’s an example of a free web editor for XLIFF files.) What type of formatting issues have you run into? Rise uses XLIFF version 1.2, do you know what version your translator was using?