Branching Scenarios: Show Us Your Favorite Examples #99

Branching Scenarios in E-Learning #99: Challenge | Recap

Branching scenarios are one of the best ways to move your click-and-read courses to something more interactive and meaningful for learners. By placing your learners in realistic situations, you can get them to practice making decisions that result in meaningful feedback and consequences.

A Practical Model for Designing Scenarios

When we teach scenario design in our workshops, we like to begin with the 3C Model. It’s easy for new learners to pick up because it focuses on the core elements of scenarios: Challenges, Choices, and Consequences. Let’s look at how it works:

The first step is to present your learners with a challenge. It can be any realistic situation that challenges your learners’ understanding on a given topic. Next, provide meaningful choices that allow your learners to make a decision. And finally, provide the appropriate consequences (feedback) for each of the choices.

A Practical Model for Designing Scenarios

Learn more about the 3C scenario model

CCAF Learning Scenario

Here’s a good example of how scenarios can be used to teach learners about scenarios. Very meta, right? I like how Jackie used challenge activities to give learners an opportunity to practice using the design model.

CCAF Learning Scenario

View the scenario | Learn more about the scenario

Engaging Text-Based Scenarios

Scenarios don’t have to be rich in multimedia and visual design to engage learners. Consider the following First Aid Exercise scenario. The countdown timer adds a nice element of urgency to the scenario.

Engaging Text-Based Scenarios

View the First Aid Exercise scenario

Challenge of the Week

This week, your challenge is to share one or more branching scenario examples. Your entry can be as simple or complex as you like.

If you want to take it easy this week, try building a text-based scenario like the First Aid example. For those looking to push the limits, show us what you can do by building on the 3C or CCAF models.

Resources

Check out some of our earlier challenges for topic-specific scenario examples:

Articles and blog posts

Here are some helpful articles around building scenarios for e-learning:

Last Week’s Challenge:

Before you create your best-case scenarios for this week’s challenge, check out the buzzword bingo games your fellow community members shared over the past week:

Instructionally Sound Buzzword Bingo Games for Meaningful E-Learning

E-Learning Buzzword Bingo Recap #98: Challenge | Recap

Wishing you a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

New to E-Learning Challenges?

The weekly challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

150 Comments
Nancy Woinoski
Todd Troost
Todd Troost
Todd Troost
Alexander Salas
Todd Troost

Thanks Alexander: I assume you are referring to the feedback text. The other demos for this course do have closed captioning which can be turned on or off, as well as a button to pause the timeline. Even though this is not a real course, it does make sense to use the same method to maintain consistency. I added a tutorial and simulation on how to use the navigation for my other demo, so that is in place. Adding closed captioning at the bottom of the screen for feedback would be easy enough. I agree about cognitive load. I think having narration with a closed captioning option is a good idea. The demo is text heavy. This is what you you were suggesting, correct? I posted a question about a problem I was having with closed captioning (a different demo) in a previous post that co... Expand

Alexander Salas
Linda Lorenzetti

Hey Todd, Welcome to the challenges. I'm so glad that you asked for constructive feedback because sometimes I know that I could offer suggestions to improve a course, but I don't want to discourage anyone, especially a newbie. I've worked in design and can give you a few tips to improve the look of this course. 1. Don't center all of your text. Look at how text is laid out in a book or a magazine, sometimes the title is centered, but the text is usually left justified. Left justified text is easier for your learner to read. 2. Resist the urge to put boxes around everything (especially text). A page of text is less overwhelming and easier on the eyes when there is some empty space around it. Get layout ideas by taking out a design book from the library. Magazines and web... Expand

Todd Troost
Cecilia  Bernal
Todd Troost
Cecilia  Bernal
Todd Troost
Brian Keys
Alexander Salas
David Anderson
Dianne Hope

Great entries everyone. Welcome to the challenges Todd - some really good feedback on your design too. I started entering the challenges as a "beginner" and thanks to this amazing community have taken on board feedback and incorporated this into my designs - looking back on some of the things I produced early on is often quite cringeworthy!! One of the tips I agree with that Linda has mentioned is to take note of what you like in a design and use this in your projects. There are so many great examples out there - I often base my designs on something I really like and the challenge in this is recreating the look and feel of the design which I have found to be really beneficial as far as then being able to use what I've learnt and be more creative. I really like how you ha... Expand

Todd Troost
Dianne Hope
Veronica Budnikas
Alexander Salas
Parichaya Kanungo
David Anderson
David Anderson