Header Image: Converting Instructor-Led Training into E-Learning with Rise 360

If you’re in a race against the clock to turn most—if not all—of your instructor-led training into e-learning, then you’ve come to the right place. Luckily, Rise 360 makes it quick and easy to create beautiful, engaging e-learning courses that work well on any device. 

But no matter how easy it is to build courses in Rise 360, it's still your job—as the e-learning designer—to determine how to present your content to ensure the best possible learning experience. 

If you’ve got your PowerPoint deck open on one side of the screen and Rise 360 open on the other and are feeling unsure about which options to choose, this article is for you!

I’m going to walk you through how I took a simple PowerPoint slide and reimagined it in Rise 360 using not one, not two, not three, but seven different block types. If you’re new to Rise 360, blocks are modular components you can customize and arrange to create your Rise 360 lessons. You can learn more about working with blocks in this article on choosing lesson and block types.

My hope is that next time you’re struggling to come up with creative ways to use the blocks in Rise 360 to turn your PowerPoint content into e-learning lessons, you’ll think back to these examples and find the inspiration you need. 

Alright, let’s start by looking at my original PowerPoint slide: 

Original PPT Slide

There’s nothing super-special going on here. It’s a straightforward bullet-point list with a photo background. Though it’s not pictured, it’s safe to assume that the instructor elaborated on the bullet points aloud as they presented them to the class. Pretty standard, right?

The lack of originality here is exactly what makes it hard to imagine another way to present this content. This slide on its own is simply uninspiring. But I didn’t let that stop me! 

Take a look at how I was able to transform this PPT slide into 7 different engaging options using Rise 360 blocks. 

Option 1: Accordion Block 

Here’s that same content, transformed using the accordion block in Rise 360:

View interactive version

It’s like night and day! One thing I like about the accordion block is that it’s really minimal. All the content—aside from the titles—is hidden away until the learner clicks. If you have a lot of information to present, using an accordion block is a good way to ensure it doesn’t overwhelm your learners.

Option 2: Tabs Block

Now look at another option, using the tabs block in Rise 360:

Option 2: Tabs Block
View interactive version

The main difference between the accordion block and the tabs block is that with the tabs block, you can see the content in the first tab from the get-go. If you include an image, this can add some visual interest to your lesson and serve as a teaser, inciting learners to click.

Option 3: Labeled Graphics Block

For this next option, I decided to lead with a visual. So naturally, I chose the labeled graphics block:

Option 3: Labeled Graphic Block

View interactive version

The labeled graphic is great for inviting people to explore product images, complex diagrams, org charts and more. I like how it adds some visual interest and allows learners to take in the content at their own pace.

Option 4: Sorting Block

Then I thought to myself, what if the goal is to not only break up your content, but encourage learners to think critically about the content? What block could I use in that situation? That’s when it came to me: why not use the sorting block? With the sorting block, you can ask learners to classify a set of flashcards into different categories, which give them a chance to reflect. Take a look at how it turned out:

Option 4: Sorting Block

View interactive version

Using the sorting block, I’ve transformed my content from a set of static bullet points to a lean-forward interaction where learners are invited to stop and think about the content.

Option 5: Timeline Block

One of the blocks you may not have considered using is the timeline block. After all, the content of my original slide isn’t a sequence of events. But take a look at how it turned out:

Option 5: Timeline Block

View interactive version

Just because it’s called a Timeline block, doesn’t mean that you can’t use it for something else. Use your imagination! And don’t be afraid to get creative. 

Option 6: Flashcards Block

Another way to put learners in the driver’s seat and allow them to learn at their own pace is by using a flashcards block. Take a peek at how the content looks in this version:

Option 6: Flashcards Block

View interactive version

I’ve opted to use the flashcard stack, but you can also choose a grid with multiple flashcards appearing side by side. It’s up to you!

Option 7: Knowledge Check Block 

Finally, I decided to create one last option using the knowledge check block. Here it is:

Option 7: Knowledge Check Block

View interactive version

Asking your learners questions is a great way to get them thinking. If they know the answer—great! If they don’t, you can give them more information in the form of feedback. You’ve also got the option to include multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, and matching questions throughout your course.

The Bottom Line

Ultimately, you have a ton of great options for using Rise 360 blocks. Don’t be afraid to try out different options and see which block type works best for your content. There’s no right or wrong answer—it all depends on your learning objectives. And with the speed of authoring content in Rise 360, you can afford to be a little experimental. So get creative, have fun, and go with your gut.

Looking for more ideas for creative ways to present your content in Rise 360? Check out these articles:

Want to try Rise 360 for yourself, but don’t have Articulate 360? Start a free 60-day trial, and come back to E-Learning Heroes regularly for more helpful advice on everything related to e-learning. If you have any questions, please share them in the comments.

2 Comments