Conference Presentation Proposals

I just wondered if I'm the only one who thinks that sending out a call for proposals and only giving the audience about 2.5 weeks to prepare something is frustrating. 

I always think I would love to share my knowledge of Instructional Design, eLearning, Storyline, all those hot button topics at a major conference (i.e. DevLearn hosted by the eLearning Guild) but the conference is in November and they only just sent a CFP out TODAY with a deadline of April 15.

I suppose that those who typically present at these conferences may already have proposals prepared and once you have it created you can just submit to multiple conferences quickly but what about those of us who haven't even entered this world of conference speaker yet? 

By the way Articulate people, they are also looking for vendors and sponsors and Captivate seems to be a SERIOUS sponsor of the eLearning guild, it sure would be nice to see more of the amazing Articulate products (particularly Storyline) out there. 

I realize this may not be the best place to post this question, but it's the only place I can find where eLearning professionals are gathering and actually interact with each other on a regular basis.

5 Replies
Daniel Brigham

Hi, Anna:

Yes, two and half weeks isn't a ton of time, but still, it is a good chunk -- let's call it 17 days. Just create a 17-day plan (joking, sort of). Ok, as a dude that speakers sort of regularly for Elearning Guild, here as some questions that might help you win a spot:

  • What topics get you fired up? Like really, not just sort of in nerdy ID way
  • What topics do you have deep experience with?
  • What topics aren't likely to be submitted by a recognized expert? (For instance, don't be submitting on "Interactive Video with Storyline," because Mr. David Anderson is going to win that spot. As he should. He's awesome)
  • Considering questions above, which topics are listed on Devlearn 15 and Learning Solutions 16 program? You should be able to get those with a bit of digging.

By the way, Articulate is totally represented at these conferences. By the developers who attend. They don't need to buy influence like other companies.

Hope that helps a bit. If you want, give your ideas some good thought, and post back here. I'll reply. Promise. 

OWEN HOLT

As a follow up, and looking ahead to next year...  

Anyone who presented at DevLearn this year (or prior years) and who would like to mentor me through the submission process, please contact me right away! (Are you listening Alexander Salas &/or Ashley Chiasson?)

It looks like they will open up submissions sometime in February of next year but there is no time like the present to start learning about the process and preparing. :)

Daniel Brigham

Hi, Owen:

I don't think there's any magic formula, but here's what's worked for me:

1. Choose a topic you really dig and know a lot about (even if it seems
small).
2. Choose a topic not everyone is doing. (for instance, don't submit
"interactive video with Storyline" because Sir David Hubbens (aka David
Anderson) owns that space. Take a look at recent DevLearn and Learning
Solution programs.
3. People dig case studies: perhaps shape the topic as to how it positively
impacted your org.

Really, it's kinda a crapshoot.

Rachel Barnum

"I suppose that those who typically present at these conferences may already have proposals prepared and once you have it created you can just submit to multiple conferences quickly but what about those of us who haven't even entered this world of conference speaker yet?"

There is nothing stopping you from making proposals ahead of time as well :)