So how did you get really started in eLearning / ID?

I pose this question because I'm itching to do more with the eLearning - instructional design skills that I currently have.  I'm pretty much the only one where I work that creates the modules using Articulate.  Most of my work is now related to developing and supporting online classes in Blackboard, but I really want to get back to the eLearning - Instructional Design side of things.  The past few years I've created 3-5 modules a year, and this year I've only created two.

I know there is much more to ID than taking a ppt from the sme and reworking it into a learning module.  I feel that often the projects that come to me are because someone has a need to teach/train others on a specific subject, but what's lacking is the actual data and measurement of learning. I know I can make beautiful, clean looking modules that meet all the objectives and learning points given to me.

I'm wanting to take on consultant jobs outside of work and/or possibly find a job that is more ID based. I feel unsure of how competent I am of the other pieces of Instructional Design that are mentioned often in open job openings/searches.  Did any of you all go through this?  How did you overcome this if so?

Did you go to school first thinking this is what you wanted to do, and found a position directly after college/grad school?  Were you doing something else similar to ID and your current workplace changed your role to be more of an "official" instructional designer?

Thanks in advance for reading and providing feedback.  I love reading the recent discussions on the role of an ID and am learning something new everyday.

Laura

1 Reply
James Brown

I grew up with a passion for computers, video games and electronics. Later got into website development. Eventually started working as a software support tech which lead me into the realm of training. Started developing instructional materials to aid users in repetitive tasks to increase the number of calls that I could take during a business day without constantly having to repeat instructions over, and over, and over again for commonly encountered issues. Eventually wanted to pursuit a masters degree and became hooked on ID when I attended Boise State.