Voice Changing Software

Hello,

Has anyone used voice changing software for their eLearning courses? I'm not a big fan of text-to-speech voices, but I need variety in my courses. I'd like to record my voice for all of the audio I need, but then change it so that it doesn't sound like me anymore. I've played with Audacity but I find it difficult to make every audio piece sound consistent. I was looking at software such as AV Voice Changing Software - Diamond edition. Has anyone used this or do you have better recommendations for me? Thank you so much!

Molly

12 Replies
Wendy A

Great question, Molly!

I wanted to record my voice for all the audio I needed for a course based on scenarios and found after running it through Audacity that it wasn't quite what I was looking for...  I ended up having a co-worker do some of the audios since we are on a limited budget.

Looking forward to the responses to your question(s).

Megan Gesing

Hi Ladies!  I ran across a software called MorphVox (there's a pro and junior version- check them out here: http://www.screamingbee.com/).  The Pro version is under $40 and the junior version is free... The quality seems so-so on the junior version, but it might be worth a look at.  The Pro version comes with some pretty neat sound effects.

Wendy Jaehnig

I'd like to resurrect this topic. Has anybody tried voice changing software to change their voice significantly? I would like to be able to change my recorded voice to sound like a man, and to just sound like it's not me. (I'm doing a series of courses with different narrators.) I've tried adjusting the pitch in Soundbooth, but it doesn't sound right.

Has anybody had any success with voice changing software or something else to change the sound of one's voice?

Jerson  Campos

I'm interested in this topic too. I don't have the "narrator's" type voice so I wouldn't mind changing it a bit.

@Wendy, have you ever tried to have somebody else listen to it with them knowing it is you? Maybe it's just a self conscience thing, like an artist, we see all the mistakes we make but other people don't see it.

David Anderson

@Wendy - some of those spy shops have some voice changers you can try. There are also software solutions but I think there's going to be an element of electronics to them.

Then, there's the autotune solution

But on a more serious note, maybe something like what Phil Hendrie does can help. He's a radio guy who does fake voices. The way he pulls off so many voices is by running his character voices through a telephone. The lo-fi approach masks that he's the one doing the voices. He also pulls of the character voices because his characters are so well defined. The characters are believable and have distinct personalities.

If you can create believable characters, the voice won't matter as much.

Wendy Jaehnig

Thanks for the suggestions folks.You're probably right David, that there will be an element of electronics to most solutions. I'm hoping for something that still sounds rich and full, but just not like me. I don't think I can pull off distinctly different characters, but that is an interesting idea.

Jerson - Although it's true that I don't really like the sound of my recorded voice (like many people I suspect), that's not why I want voice changing software. I am creating a series of courses using some of the characters in Storyline, and I want to be able to do the voices myself. I'm doing my own voice for one of them.

I've found some software called AV Voice Changing software (as the original poster mentioned), and wondered if it would do the trick. Perhaps I should download the trial and find out. I suspect it won't be quite what I had in mind.

Daniel Brigham

Hi, Molly:

Have you tried the "change pitch" effect in Audacity? I often use that if I need to play a few different characters. You can also play with the "change tempo" effect as well.

More important than variety is quality narration. Do you have a copy of James Alburger's Art of Voice Acting? Good stuff.