9 Replies
Chet Hertz

Yes!  I used the new capabilities to craft and display a more streamlined initial entry screen and a more curated presentation of first-impression navigation options (rather than the long, grey, generated topic list that defaults to the topmost page).  Then, after the user is thus guided/eased into the portal contents proper, full navigation capabilities open up.  

I can't link you to it or show you pictures because it's a company-internal sales learning portal that I've built with Rise.  Plus it's deployed via SharePoint behind a firewall.  But I can describe for you here what I did and how...

  1. Created a blocks lesson-1, an illustrated, font and color-rich Navigation page -- basically a gussied up button stack.
  2. Cloned my whole course / learning portal, duplicating it into what I'll call here for ease of reference Start Portal and Whole Portal.
  3. Deleted everything from my Start Portal except the curated Navigation Lesson-1.  Linked that page's navigation buttons to launch the URLs of the respective chapters over in Whole Portal.  So upon-button-click from Start Portal, user bypasses Whole-Portal's topmost page and navigates directly to the chapter selected.
  4. Set the Start Portal to never display left-nav pane -- "no sidebar".   
  5. Set the Whole Portal to always display left-nav pane -- "open". 
  6. Linked the Whole Portal's navigation buttons to its own respective internal chapters. 

It works great.  I built it first in a dev folder and demo-ed it to some UX guinea pigs.  They liked the changes and suggested some nice embellishments that I implemented before promoting it to production.

Good luck e-Learning Heroes in your intrepid experimentation!  And thanks Articulate staff for the strong tool -- keep the features coming!

Andrew Ratner

Chet, this is super interesting and I have so many questions about this: 

1. Can you elaborate a little more on how you cloned the whole course / learning portal? Was this already created as a lesson previously?

2. I didn't know you could customize the nav panes to distinct lessons -- or am I misreading this? Are your portals considered separate courses?

I'm really wishing to see how you did it! Really awesome, Chet. Thanks for doing it!

Chet Hertz

Yeah, wish I could show it (but confidential and proprietary, etc., so no) -- but will answer as many Q's as community has about it.  Yours:

  1. From a course's " ... " menu on its Rise dashboard display, select "Duplicate" and name the clone in the subsequent dialogue interaction.
  2. (a) What I customized per course was not Rise-generated nav ;  it was the curated navigation I created with button stack within block Lesson-1.    (b) I end up with Start Portal being a single-lesson course consisting of only block Lesson-1's navigation button stack.  And Whole Portal being a 40+ lesson course.  Start Portal launches directly into button-selected chapter of the 40+ lesson Whole Portal.  From Start Portal my users can only navigate to lessons that my buttons take them.  Once they get there, in Whole Portal, all navigation options open up for them and they can roam freely.  So I split it into two courses behind the curtains just for purposes of more gently directing their initial experience -- not making them have to pick from a 40+ list of generated gray lesson links.  But the split is mostly unnoticed to users, because aside from the fact that Start Portal launches Whole Portal in a separate browser tab, everything looks compatible and complementary.

Does that additional info help?  If anyone has better (or differently good) ideas, please share.  This was what I could figure out how to do something helpful for my audience with the new "no sidebar" options.  Other use cases and approaches will be interesting to read here too.

Chet Hertz

I don't think there's a setting through which to remove the prev/next lesson nav from lesson top/bottom. 

But in the course settings navigation controls you can set mode to restricted, if that helps for your purposes.  That disables the lesson-bottom next nav until you have paged completely through the currently displayed lesson and interacted with all its gizmos.

Plus there's the blocks divider continue button, which enables you to control forward navigation conditionally.

So maybe some creative combination gets you the nav you're looking for.