Creating Dynamic and Personalized E-Learning with Random Number Variables #278

Random Number Variables in E-Learning #278: Challenge | Recap

Knowing how to use variables is essential when you need to present content based on your learners’ activity, choices, scores, and other defined conditions. And with Storyline's random number variables you have even more options for designing dynamic e-learning.

Here are just a few examples of what’s possible:

  • Sales scenarios that present a new challenge each time the learner visits the course
  • Red flags that show random risk events each time a slide is visited
  • Customer service scenarios that randomize the number of customers, stock items, or shoplifters
  • Food and beverage industry scenarios that randomize the available waitstaff, customers, or food items
  • Skill and drill exercises for solving math problems

Using random number variables is just another way to design more dynamic e-learning. And that’s what this week’s challenge is all about.

Challenge of the Week

This week, your challenge is to share an e-learning example that uses random number variables. 

Share Your E-Learning Work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published example and blog post.
  • Forums: Start  your own thread and share a link to your published example..
  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.
  • Social Media: If you share your demos on Twitter or LinkedIn, try using #ELHChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

Last Week’s Challenge:

Before you randomly jump into this week’s challenge, take some time to review the amazing instructional design activities your fellow community members shared over the past week:

Instructional Design Activities and Examples #277

Instructional Design Activities and Examples #277: Challenge | Recap

Wishing you a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

New to the E-Learning Challenges?

The weekly e-learning challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

166 Comments
Joseph Spivey
Narda Butler
Trey McNabb
Tobias Noeske

Here's my submission for this week: A random math quiz. All numbers in the calculations are random (except the result of course) and the order of the different layers with the different calcluations are also randomised. https://360.articulate.com/review/content/12698ee1-06fe-4841-9b99-e3949c32135e/review There are a few issues I couldn't solve so far: - for some reason Internet Explorer seems to have problems with calculating correctly. No matter what result you type in it will count it as wrong. - I'm still looking for a way to set the focus on the numeric input every time a layer opens so you don't have to click it all the time - I'm also looking for a way to completely clear the numeric trigger variable so the field will be empty every time it is shown anew. So far I always re... Expand

Narda Butler
Mark Weingarten
Alex Jinca
David Tait
Zsolt Olah

Hi everyone, I did this last year (before the changes in Storyline with their January update) but the concept can still work: It's testing your math and strategy skills. The numbers are random, the dots where you collect coins are random as well. Play with Calcy [kalki]: https://www.rabbitoreg.com/examples/calcy/story_html5.html How it's done: https://www.rabbitoreg.com/examples/p99/#/lessons/cbc4yvAA2gSbF2zQUoL_26HbatjVdcWd A couple of words on "randomness" from game design: Randomization improves replayability, which means that you can replay the game over and over again and you go through a different experience. There are different types of randomization you may apply: - Randomization of a set of numbers without repeats: let's say you have 5 scenarios num... Expand

Trey McNabb
Steve Hazelton