Using Interactive Video Quizzes in E-Learning #257

Interactive Video Quizzes in E-Learning #258: Challenge | Recap

Videos are a great way to capture learners’ attention, render information visually, and give them a break from text-heavy content. 

When you combine videos with interactive elements such as: cue points, hotspots, buttons, and markers, you can go transform the typical e-learning quiz or scenario into something more engaging for learners. And leveraging video to create more engaging e-learning is what this week’s challenge is all about!

Challenge of the Week

This week, your challenge is to share an interactive video quiz, scenario, or knowledge check.

Your entry can be anything from a rough concept to a polished example. The challenges are open to everyone, regardless of experience or skill level. If you need technical or creative help with your project, please ask in our forums and reference the challenge number you’re working on.

Related Challenges

We’ve hosted several video-based challenges. You’re welcome to combine challenge topics to share your examples in more than one challenge.

Last Week’s Challenge:

Before you jump into this week’s challenge, check out the mobile-inspired e-learning examples your fellow community members shared over the past week:

Mobile Navigation Templates and Examples

Mobile Navigation Templates and Examples RECAP #257: Challenge | Recap

Wishing you a great week, E-Learning Heroes!

New to the E-Learning Challenges?

The weekly e-learning challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

159 Comments
Daniel Sweigert
Tobias Noeske
Jonathan Hill
Jodi Sansone
Jonathan Hill
Jodi Sansone
Jonathan Hill
Merel Wesselink

Hi Syed, Great interactive video! This would be a perfect test for people who are trying to get their driver's licence. I thought it was fun having to click in the video to provide your answer, it felt very natural. I also liked the fact that you didn't use the red colour to address an error. Instead, you used a neutral colour: grey. This makes it feel less "wrong", yet you still want to give it another go. A few tips: - Highlight the action verbs ("to identify", "click on, etc,), so that it's easier to read what needs to be done. - Insert a timer/countdown of the video, so that the learner knows how long the video takes and within what time frame to provide his/her answer. - Insert a motivating sentence when the learner does something wrong, like "That's not quite r... Expand

Artem Kuzmin
Jonathan Hill
Ernesto Yannini
Tobias Noeske
Karen Philips
Jonathan Hill
Natalie Budesa

Hello everyone! This is my first entry into the challenges and my second time making something in Articulate. I'm a teacher transitioning into ID. Can you tai chi? Here is my quiz to find out: https://360.articulate.com/review/content/7f0c122d-2479-43dc-a41f-e4d410d0b749/review When I searched free videos on Pexels, I was instantly drawn to some Tai Chi videos because I used to live in China. The answers are not all correct names and they definitely don't actually match the videos. Please use your imagination! The idea is that the learner would watch the videos, then identify something based on what they have seen. Some issues I had that I wouldn't mind help with: I could not get my "Finish" button to actually jump to my "Results" page. I have a trigger linked to th... Expand

Samuel Apata
Jeffrey Riley
Jeffrey Riley
Natalie Budesa
Matilda Morton
Matilda Morton
Natalie Budesa