Best Hardware Suggestions for Storyline Design (and Adobe Creative Suite)!

Hi,

I have the list of the minimum system requirements for Storyline, however, I need to purchase and set up a desktop station for our Instructional Design Team.  We all have laptops, but would like a desktop station.  We use Storyline for all course design, and we have full access to the Adobe Creative Cloud apps as well. Would love to know what experienced multimedia developers/designers would recommend.   Thanks for any and all advice in advance!

Aloha,

Kris

4 Replies
Ali Goulet

Hi Kristine,

Thanks so much for reaching out here! I'll have to defer to the community on preferences and suggestions regarding this. However, you may also want to reach out in our Building Better Courses forum as there are many developers and designers hanging out there who might be able to provide some personal experience and tips for you as well. :) 

Dave Cox

Hi Kristine,

That's a tough question, and it really depends a lot on your goals. Today's laptops have a lot of capabilities, sometimes more than the comparable desktops. For me, one of the best advantageous of the desktop is the ability to have more monitor real-estate, but depending on your laptop, you may be able to hook up good additional monitors as well. 

You also indicated that you also have the Adobe Creative Suite, which in my humble opinion is a must to create quality presentations. Still, what hardware you need once again kind of depends on what you are doing with it. If you are only using Photoshop, then you probably don't need as much horsepower as if you are using After Effects and Premier Pro.

So no matter what platform you use, the real key is performance. The more co-processors, the better. Next, the more memory the better. Even with great processing power, your processing ability can really be limited by too little memory to work with. Next, go with a lot of storage. but if you can, go with two hard drives rather than one. That way you can have your OS, and working files on one drive, and your scratch and temp files on another drive. This helps speed up your processing, because not everything is going down the same pipe to the same drive. (Think of the traffic jam going to a packed event. Data going to and from storage does the same thing.)

Ha, so I know I haven't really answered your question. But I don't know your goals for your hardware. Hopefully I've given you some thought to steer you in the correct direction.

Kristine Lesperance

Hi Dave,

Sorry I've been remiss in responding to your helpful reply. You've offered some good ideas. I'll be taking your input as well as others from the other page, and working with IT in the next few weeks.  We hope to create a great desktop station for our instructional design team.

Thanks again, and Aloha!

Kris