"Course" is not acceptable.

Hi.

Experienced something that I knew would come at some point.

I spent 1.5 days solidly building a soft-skills course.

Client had been asked by HIS client for 15 minutes, visually interesting, not too interactive (but it had some layer clicks etc.)

When he showed it, they apparently changed their tune - wanted 5 minutes, and in a format "...that the Gen Xers will not be bored by".

So...

1. Think they are crazy to think you can teach anything that matters, (and this subject was quite important...) completely in 5 minutes.

2. If they wanted video etc. then fair enough (should have said...), but sometimes, it just takes more - Heaven help them if they ever have to read a book for example!

Anyway - my first feeling was that the tech we have here (rapid eLearning) in any of its forms is just completely wrong, as an ID I need to be competent at building in other tools as well, but I'm just not sure what. Prezi? PowToon?

Really not looking for an answer as not sure I have the question yet - but it was something that just felt odd. I appreciate that the original specification was completely wrong, and we have salvaged the content for use as a vanilla offering by my client, but they obviously wanted something other than "a course".

Bruce

14 Replies
David Anderson

I get where you and your clients are coming from. For most of us in elearning, there's a defined and possibly narrow agreement of what online training looks like. We know what our corporate clients and employers expect from us.

Contrast our version of online training with marketing, explainer videos, interactive conversations,  and multimedia journalism and you start to see the training "product" emphasize different elements. 

It's probably less about the tool than it is the storyline (no pun intended) and available resources.[

We like to use the Hungry Suitcase example in our workshops. It's a fun example. The drag-drop animations, talking suitcase, sound effects and pacing make it a lot of fun to use. But it's ultimately no different than asking learners to click check boxes to select their preferred vacations.

They're both asking users to complete the same tasks. The suitcase emphasizes play more than the other example, but they're both valid. Which one do you think cost more to develop?

When I used to consult, I would run into projects that were less about training than they were engagement. You see a lot of these in the non-profit and public service announcement areas. 

To circle back to your tools comment, I really dont think tools are the issue as much as storytelling and design. The interactive conversations JellyVision create are possible in just about any tool. The writing and storytelling combined with visuals is what makes them fun to watch.

Nancy Woinoski

I am kind of in the middle on this one. I agree with Bruce that eLearning tools can be limiting for certain types of design but also agree with David that you can do a lot with them given the time and resources.

@Bruce - I think in your case this is more about a client not really knowing what they wanted at first so it probably wouldn't have mattered what tool you were using. It almost seems like a series of infographics might be the  way to go for your project instead of an actual course.  I haven't used Prezi in an SL course yet but it is pretty easy to use and I think you should be able to embed the presentation in SL  as a web object. It would be nice if one tool could do it all but this isn't the case so you are right that IDs need to be competent in designing in other tools.

As for the JellyVision style interactions that David mentioned, I just completed something in a similar style using Storyline.  Here's a link for anyone who is interested.

http://pinchedhead.com/examples/Global%20Matrix%20%20output/story.html

john faulkes

Bruce - my first thought is that there is no real answer to this, and probably won't be for some time to come.

I wish sometimes that clients could understand the difference between inspiration and motivation. Getting people excited, 'wow' factor, deploying senior people as talking heads...all very inspirational. Also shows up the commissioning people in a good light. The key thing though about inspiration is that it's great while it's happening, but it starts to fade as soon as it stops. Because it's all 'push'; it's all 'sell'.

Are we the only people holding the torch for what makes real learning? Learning by doing, by experiencing. By trying things out and getting it wrong sometimes. This is what motivates people, and once the learning challenges are overcome, new skills are more permanent...

Don't give up the principles, whatever wow stuff you use!

deb creghan

Sometimes what they need isn't what they want....  I encounter this with my SMEs periodically.  I view myself as a problem solver and sometimes eLearning isn't going to solve their problem -- but they want something slick and cool.  Maybe what your client needs is something short that motivates people and then some other tool that will teach them...  good luck!

Bruce Graham

In the end we got all militant about this...  

No longer selling to the original client, but wanted to see if we could create "funky" in 4-minutes.

I give you "Coaching Skills and the GROW Model" - built using PowToon in a Storyline shell.

This would never be a standalone course - but perhaps linked with pre-work, and as a "starter course" (commercial...????), it would work.

Could CERTAINLY use the concept for scenarios.

Bruce

Natalia Mueller

@Bruce that turned out great. I love the style. I'm sure that was a frustrating experience. Thanks for sharing both the challenge and the outcome with us.

@Nancy- so glad you shared this. You did a GREAT job. Did you create some of it in PPT and import as a video file or is all created inside Storyline? Either way, beautifully executed. 

Nancy Woinoski

Natalia Mueller-Spurgin said:

@Bruce that turned out great. I love the style. I'm sure that was a frustrating experience. Thanks for sharing both the challenge and the outcome with us.

@Nancy- so glad you shared this. You did a GREAT job. Did you create some of it in PPT and import as a video file or is all created inside Storyline? Either way, beautifully executed. 


Hi Natalia - Thanks so much.  All of the animation was done in Storyline. I just played around with different enter and exits animations (adjusting speeds and directions) and slide transitions.  The only trick I did was for some of the fly in and fly out animations. I put shapes over top of them to make it look like the transition was starting and stopping at a specific point on the screen instead of flying or out in from the outside of the screen.

Bruce Graham

Nancy Woinoski said:

The only trick I did was for some of the fly in and fly out animations. I put shapes over top of them to make it look like the transition was starting and stopping at a specific point on the screen instead of flying or out in from the outside of the screen.

That is a GREAT trick

Come on...that's got to be "Screenr-worthy"!  

Bruce