Gamification presentation advice

I have been tasked with giving a presentation to the rest of my team in a monthly team meeting next week about Gamification.  I have a 20min slot to give an overview of what it is, how we could use it, etc.

So I know quite a bit about gamification and have already successfully implemented it in some training however I am a little stuck as to how to approach this presentation.  If possible I would like to gamify my presentation but I am a little stuck for ideas on how to do it (if at all possible) and what I should include in it.

Any suggestions on a way to approach this would be most welcome.

14 Replies
Nick n/a

Hi David,

The following may be useful.

Ten Cool Ways to gamify your next presentation, training, or facilitation:

1) Feedback, interaction, and engagement
2) Team and collaborative exercises
3) Actual games (also simulations & role plays)
4) Power ups and rewards in an LMS (verbal rewards during a presentation–but for a prize at the end)
5) Visual Progress report (although this is almost inevitably collective rather than individualized)
6) Perhaps a sense of not being complete when you get done with presentation (“you haven’t fully powered up until you X”–although I think for most audiences using that language doesn’t make sense–it might to gamers/geeks and teens.
7) Feedback at the end of the presentation (hopefully stored in a database which aggregates the emotional-semantic data). This doesn’t gamify the presentation for the audience, as much as it gamifies it for the presenter.
8] QR codes (although this can be overkill). It seems like this is a gimmick unless used sparingly. QR codes could be used for feedback, additional resources or job aids or activities.
9) Points assigned to activities (perhaps flexible enough that players decide). Although this might be an easier sell in the classroom than the training or facilitation room.
10) Treating the experience as a collective (or individual) quest/challenge/mission as embodied in a story/metaphor/allegory/simulation/scenario.

I think one of the strongest ways to gamify it is to add elements of feedback, play, and a relevant incentive structure (and probably follow up and performance review.)

And finally a comparison of Gamification to garbage for a light hearted approach and finish to the presentation.

http://www.idonotes.com/IdoNotes/IdoNotes.nsf/dx/gamification-as-explained-by-dilbert.htm

Please send a PM if you need anything else.

Nicholas

Jedidiah Esposito

I used to do some classroom teaching with younger ages and had a pretty simple game that ended up working well with adults too. 

Basically I'd print out a few pictures of racecars (could be anything really) - cut them out, and put a magnet or tape on the back. I'd draw a track on the board with a start line and a finish. Then just run a little gameshow with teams to answer questions and move each team's car/blimp/whatever ahead a space when they answer correctly.

It sounds simple but there's something magical about how people respond when there's a race in front of them. 

I imagine this could easily be extended beyond answering simple questions into the realm of participation. One could add 'powerups' of various kinds, etc. 

This might not work for the entire presentation, but I'm sure some creative minds around here could extend it quite a bit.

OWEN HOLT

Pull together a list of "gamification myths" and hide them on a "lottery scratch-off card". Let participants scratch off to reveal one myth at a time. Discuss the myth and what they think the implications are on learning or training design. Reward the best contribution to the discussion with an actual lottery scratch off card (if available in your location).  I've used something like this long ago and discovered that Texas Learners love the Lotto.
If you don't have access to lottery cards, make your own. One virtual scratch off with prizes hidden under some of the scratch locations. 

David Price

Thank you for all the suggestions.  I decided not to gamify the presentation itself as I couldn't get anything that would fit well into the 20mins I have.  In the end I chose to go for a simple presentation where I will talk about what it is.  It only needs to be a high level overview as I have training workshops later in November that will go into it in more detail.

Here is a link to my presentation if anyone is interested - http://talktalkacademy.co.uk/gamification/gamification.html (it is HTML5 so you will need the latest version of IE, Firefox or Chrome to view it.  Also you need to use your arrow keys on your keyboard to navigate if you haven't used on of these before)

I decided to show off the use of new presentation techniques at the same time but using a Prezi style presentation (I used Impress.js instead).  My first attempt at it so please go easy

Any suggestions on things I could add or remove would be more than welcome.

Nick n/a

I enjoyed the presentation David. I was unable to view some of the slides as Prezi can be difficult to manipulate.

Other then that keeping it short and simple made it much easier for me to pick up key points.

I'm sure others can offer more informed opinions as to the design elements.

Do you have a pdf copy of it available?

Nicholas

Joshua Roberts

David Price said:

Thank you for all the suggestions.  I decided not to gamify the presentation itself as I couldn't get anything that would fit well into the 20mins I have.  In the end I chose to go for a simple presentation where I will talk about what it is.  It only needs to be a high level overview as I have training workshops later in November that will go into it in more detail.

Here is a link to my presentation if anyone is interested - http://talktalkacademy.co.uk/gamification/gamification.html (it is HTML5 so you will need the latest version of IE, Firefox or Chrome to view it.  Also you need to use your arrow keys on your keyboard to navigate if you haven't used on of these before)

I decided to show off the use of new presentation techniques at the same time but using a Prezi style presentation (I used Impress.js instead).  My first attempt at it so please go easy

Any suggestions on things I could add or remove would be more than welcome.


The link you've provided 404's for me!

Joseph Fournier

Scott Payne and I gamified a brief presentation to our team by using Storyline to create a Jeopardy-like game with scoring and visuals and pointing them to a bunch of resources so they could compete as sub-teams. It was great fun.

If you have some easily accessed, or searchable resources, you might be able to do the same with "gamification."

For our topic, we decided we were more interested in assuring our team members were aware of resources than providing them with an information dump, so we did a quick orientation of the resources; then fired up the game. In the end, I think, we were all winners. '-)

Helen Gordon

I love the visual infographic style look of your presentation slides, with solid core content to give them a taster of what's to come in the workshop. 

Your post made me thing of this presentation I saw on Five Things Game Designers Can Teach eLearning Designers: 

http://www.slideshare.net/kkapp/5-things-i-ds-can-learn-from-game-designers

Although it's quite a gamified presentation which you've decided isn't the best route for your time frame, it might give you some more ideas or could give the audience the link to have a look at. At the end, to give them something to think about or to provide a discussion (or even a competitive end if you split them into two teams and get them to write up as many answers as they can think of), you could give them some examples of gamified content / ideas (good and bad) and ask them what makes an effective use of gamification and what doesn't.