How do I make a boring flowchart into an interesting interaction?

I'm creating a course where some concepts have to be taught using the business flowcharts. I've created a road map to indicate the steps and once the user clicks, a description pops up for each step. 

But I'm not very satisfied with this approach and I wonder if you might have some fresh ideas I could use.

Looking forward to your comments and thanks in advance!! 

18 Replies
Bob S

Maybe because it's Friday, I have games in my head....  Would converting the flowcharts to a board-game type format work?

Think LIFE or some other classic game, where each space you land on something happens, a card is drawn, etc. And if things go well you skip a space (ie skip process step if condition A is met) , or if you mess up..... go back a space (ie Return to previous process step if condition B occurs).

Scott Wiley

You might try incorporating a story of a hypothetical character, or two, actually following the flowchart steps in contextual "real world" examples.

Perhaps the flow-chart could act as a resource the learner could refer to and make choices for the character to see how it plays out in various scenarios.

It is more work, but could be much more learner-centric and engaging than just showing the steps.

Danielle Delgeras
Scott Wiley

You might try incorporating a story of a hypothetical character, or two, actually following the flowchart steps in contextual "real world" examples.

Perhaps the flow-chart could act as a resource the learner could refer to and make choices for the character to see how it plays out in various scenarios.

It is more work, but could be much more learner-centric and engaging than just showing the steps.

Like a choose your own ending type of story? How then do you control that the necessary information is being presented? I like this type of idea, I'm just unsure of how to implement it. I guess participants only have a select few choices to make, and therefore it is a little more controlled....but....yeah. I guess it requires a little more thought before execution. 

Scott Wiley

I don't think you would need to go that deep with multi-branching scenarios, only the branches that appear in your flow-chart.

It is hard to know without seeing how complex the flowchart is, but if very complex you don't have to have them "experience" every possible decision, but more the high-level "what ifs" associated with each major branch.

Scott Wiley

Yes, but not at liberty to share "internal use only" content here.

While this is more complex ("choose your own ending") than I was speaking of, I was originally inspired by a Cathy Moore project named "Connect with Haji Kamal."

First take a look at this high-level flowchart that describes the possible pathways through her training course - http://blog.cathy-moore.com/wp-content/Haji-flow-simplified.png

Now imagine a simplified version of that to match your internal flowchart and how you might create a story that would help a learner navigate through the various branches of the flowchart.

See how the "Connect with Haji Kamal" course plays out here. - http://www.worldwarfighter.com/hajikamal/activity/

Oh and by the way, you don't need super complex tools to create something like this. As a proof of concept, years ago I recreated her "Haji" course using Articulate Presenter (the first version).

Mark  Burns

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Good day Priysha! My advice to you is don't use more branches. Yah we all know
flowchart is a series of steps but you should make it more precise. I have link
to be you guide.

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