How to make simple tips memorable?

I think this is one of the toughest problems I struggle with.

I often end up with some facts that are really important and unknown to the learner, yet too simple to make any kind of scenario exercise out of. Let's say you make a course on how to plan a party and you would want stuff like "Make sure to buy a cake", "Don't play dull music" and "Party hats can spice things up!" to go in there.

How would you present this information to make it as memorable as possible?

20 Replies
Rich Calcutt

Eric, 

I don't know if you've ever seen this, but it's a nice set of hints/tips from marketing that are brilliant for learning designers. Take a look - there are a few things that might help you make the hints and tips memorable. 

For me, it's all about context. Giving commandments and a "thou shalt" list is meaningless unless it's given some relevance to me. In your party example, you could relate each tip to some rating like "guest satisfaction" - something that makes it real. 

Hope that helps a bit, 

Rich

Eric Isaksson

Okay, thanks Daniel!

It's about how nurses  in old people's homes can support relatives of the patients by:

Encourage relatives to bring their children when they visit.

Encourage relatives to touch and be close to the patient. 

Give practical information on community support to the relatives.

Encourage relatives to take part in the care of the patient.

They should also know what a stressful situation the relatives are going through.

Bruce Graham

Why do they need to do these things?

These are all EMOTIONAL outputs - you have a great opportunity to use a set of similar black and white photos (for example).

These are all about helping with (for example...) family guilt (from my experience with these homes...), right or wrong feelings of guilt need to be addressed.

These are Heath Brother's "Simple" and "Emotional".

Daniel Brigham

Hi, Eric: Regarding your first two ideas:

  1. Encourage relatives to bring their children when they visit.
  2. Encourage relatives to touch and be close to the patient.

I would think photos would work well. And you or someone in your organization could take them. I've attached is a sample photo that I took that gets to points one and two above. I would let the photo do most of the expressing in situations like this.

Bruce Graham

Eric Isaksson said:

It's true they all have to do with emotions I guess. Could you elaborate a bit Bruce, black & white photos?


Nothing on the screen except a powerful image. Words spoken.

You need to make learners FEEL THE REASONS WHY THESE ARE IMPORTANT THINGS TO LEARN.

Words can be "Imagine how you would feel if...".

Hope that helps.

Diana Myers

Hi Eric,

To make the list of tips more memorable, you could present each tip on a single slide with an appropriate font on black background and add an emotional photo that reinforces that tip.  It gives each tip the importance it needs and can help the learner connect to the information in a personal way.

Here's a quick published sample of what I mean

I've also attached the story file.  Hope this helps!

Good luck and let us know what you decided to do.

Diana

Bruce Graham

Diana Myers said:

Hi Eric,

To make the list of tips more memorable, you could present each tip on a single slide with an appropriate font on black background and add an emotional photo that reinforces that tip.  It gives each tip the importance it needs and can help the learner connect to the information in a personal way.

Here's a quick published sample of what I mean

I've also attached the story file.  Hope this helps!

Good luck and let us know what you decided to do.

Diana

Spot on. Pretty much what I was trying to say - but beautifully executed Diana.
Joshua Roberts

I always find that videos create the most engaging simple tips reminder. I've created multiple short, punchy videos and afterwards viewers are able to recall the smallest details. 

If you would like any advice with video creation echoing the thoughts of Bruce and Diana then please just get in touch.

Eric Isaksson

I'm hijacking my own thread with yet another challenge. I guess I haven't quite got my head around this instructional design thing yet...

This time it's about old people and nutrition. The points that must be conveyed are:

  • It's important that they eat enough, preferably foods rich in energy.
  • Offer them their favorite dish, served in small portions and in an aesthetically appealing way.
  • When the person is close to dying, they tend to not want to eat anymore. This is perfectly natural.
  • Relatives might be concerned by this and feel powerless in the situation. They might try to convince the dying person to eat, which can be very stressful to him or her.
  • But it's important that the dying person doesn't eat or drink too much in this stage as this can cause nausea and illness. Instead, just give the person a few drops of water, pain relief, good mouth care and good care in general.

Thanks again guys, wouldn't know what do without you!

Diana Myers

Hey Eric,

You could go in almost any direction with this, and hopefully you receive a variety of ideas.  You'll want to consider how extensive the list of tips is as well as how this interaction would fit into the rest of your course.  Here's just one way you could go:

Nutrition Tips Output

Cary Glenn

Hi Eric,

I would avoid music for a couple of reasons. One, musical tastes vary, what one person finds relaxing another could find annoying. This might interfere with the message of the course.

Two, this course could, and probably will, present some emotional challenges for people. If you ended up choosing a song that the person really liked or is popular they could end up with the emotions of dealing with the loss of a loved one every time they hear that song. Similar to a trigger for PTSD. I still remember the songs I was listening to when one of my Grandmothers was sick in the hospital, and that was almost 30 years ago.