Inspiration Needed: Compliance Course

I'm working on an elearning course and struggling for inspiration on design. On one hand, it's a "compliance" course in that we need to track that the employees are receiving this course on a yearly basis. If it were solely that, I would probably consider throwing it in a template with some minimal "interactivity," and including a quiz at the end (as painless as possible, right?). On the other hand, one of the purposes of doing this refresher training is to ensure employees can respond to a few key questions (about security procedures). The frequency of them having to answer these questions (from an auditor/inspector type) is very low, but if they cannot respond to the questions correctly, we could lose our certification effectively killing the majority of our business.

This course is intended to supplement an ILT course that is more in-depth. Ideally, it would serve as an introduction for new hires (to the program, to the procedures) before the more extensive ILT course AND serve as an annual refresher course. I'm still trying to decide if it makes sense to use the same course for both purposes.

Thanks!

5 Replies
Rebekah Massmann

I should mention, one of the approaches I would love to use would be to kick it off with a scenario like this example:

http://blog.cathy-moore.com/2013/08/why-you-want-to-put-the-activity-first/

I'm just trying to figure out how to best approach that type of design while still getting the other more "high level" or "awareness level" information out there also to meet our compliance requirements.

Daniel Brigham

Hi, Rebekah: Those key pieces of info you need to cover: are they related to different topics? If so, you might create a few moderately simple branched scenarios (i.e. specific info), then that lead into the bigger topics (more general info) from which they emanate. Every decent sized topic could perhaps start with a moderately simple scenario.

That's a structure that might help you get at the specific and general info. Often, it's just coming up with artful transitions. Thanks for the question. Gets me thinking.

Laura M

Hi Rebekah,

I'm working on a corporate quality system training right now that is covering the broad overview of the responsibilities that fall to key areas of the company.  I broke up the material into sections.  We start with two overview/general background sections.  We followed with sections for the three major areas of focus, each starting off with an ungraded scenario quiz question. These are all based on real cases and include links to learn more.  After they answer the quiz question, they receive feedback and the information on that topic is presented.  The whole course concludes with a final 10 question graded quiz with mostly simple scenario/multiple choice questions.  I'm in the piloting phase with it now and feedback on the scenarios has been fantastic.  I think the key is to come up with examples that really can be "gray," so people see that not every real situation will be a simple yes or no.

We are in the same boat with needing to make sure our employees really understand what is being taught in compliance training, as we are audited by a variety of global regulatory groups every year.  And obviously our quality system is a huge basis for how we operate.  Fun stuff    Good luck!

Rebekah Massmann

Thanks for the ideas and suggestions! I think several mini sections starting with scenarios and feedback will probably work well for us, followed up by some of the more high-level or "pushed" information.

I'm doing some rough action mapping to try and structure the course accordingly. The compliance side "compromises" to a pure scenario-based approach will be to include some content that is peripheral to the scenarios, and to include a traditional assessment at the end.

I need to do some additional analysis, but it appears there may some scenarios that only apply to certain groups, in which case I might do various "paths" through the course based upon role.

Rachel Barnum

Hey Rebekah, I saw a great idea for compliance courses that we're considering moving towards. Basically, we'd start out with the scenario and there'd be a total of X amount of questions - we'll say 5 for this example. Each quiz question would pertain to a certain "section" of the compliance course.

The person goes through the scenario and reaches the first quiz question. They manage to get it right. They then skip the first section entirely, and move to the next question. If they get the next question wrong, then they have to move through the entire section then take the quiz question again at the end. And so on from there, if they get the question right, they skip the section. If they get it wrong, they have to take the section.

If you're considering this for new hires as well, you could put in a question at the beginning that asks if they have taken this compliance course before. If they haven't, then they have to go through each section no matter what.

Good luck!