Video production equipment

I have recently purchased video equipment to start creating some video in the our courses.  here is a list of items purchased.  Pricing maybe a little different now on Amazon but it will give you price point.  Hope this helps. 

the only two things not on here are the tripod and another handheld device to connect the camera and the wireless receiver. 

adorama heavy duty L-bracket standard flash shoe mounts 10.99

28 Replies
eric mongrain

Patti,

i attended the Multimedia for instrctional designers course and came back with some extra knowledge on how to make the narrations sound better using audacity and also some vocal exercises to do before narrating.  the other part of the course that was great was how to make a storyboard for video and how to use different camera angles and shots to get the learner to be engaged.  there was parts of the course that really did not pertain to instructional design but all in all it was a good two day class. 

Ellyn Lambert

Hi- just starting to purchase equipment to create a video/edit suite at our company. We want to do some quick 1 minute elearnings videos. We will also utilize the equipment for additional elearning content.

I see the posting are over 100 days old. Any updates you can share for purchasing a camera, lights, mic and green screen equipment?

George Hayman

Ellyn, what type of budget range for everything?

David, the biggest secret to green screen is making sure you have enough light and contrast between the subject and the green.  I recently had someone who wore a bright yellow blouse and it really messed with the key.

FCPX has really been a let down in the Professional market, but it does have a decent keyer in it.  And you always have to be careful of people's hair and also glasses.

Geo

Ellyn Lambert

Thanks for the reply.

I like to keep it under $3,000 total if possible, however can go as high as $4,000 everything in.

I see the Westcost ulite Green screen kit is only $249, so that's good. Do I need additional lights? I'm really focused on the right camera and mic.

What works best with Articulate elearnings?

Liked you comments and feedback. Good points

George Hayman

Hi,

That price seems incredible if the lights work well.  I'm a bit spoiled because we have some studio lighting.

The green screen itself is no big deal, that it available in many places, but like it said you have to make it as smooth as possible and with no shadow.  So you need light that goes on the green screen behind the subject and one up front to light them.  Again think contrast.

As far as bringing it into articulate, the issue there will be more of the flash encoding but that happens after you have produced the video.  I would just try it and see, but make it talking head type framed and without lots of movement and it should be fine.

Another thing is this, you can crop the green part of the image to just be around the subject more in post production and thus have less to worry about if the green doesn't key well at the edges.

Steve Flowers

One other thing to consider is the size of your room and the size of the green screen. You don't want your actors right up against the screen. The farther away from the screen the subject the easier it is to differentiate the lighting and prevent splash that will make it really difficult to pull a key. This also lets you DOF the backdrop a little (not a lot) bit to smooth over minor shadows or imperfections that could muck up your key with noisy stuff. 10-15 feet of separation seems like a lot and will require a relatively large green screen, but it really helps you fully light your backdrop without seriously affecting your subject.

Rich Johnstun

Ellyn Lambert said:

Hi- just starting to purchase equipment to create a video/edit suite at our company. We want to do some quick 1 minute elearnings videos. We will also utilize the equipment for additional elearning content.

 

I see the posting are over 100 days old. Any updates you can share for purchasing a camera, lights, mic and green screen equipment?


I've posted this picture before. Here is my home green screen setup. I've got $120 invested. 

The green screen is from tubetape.com and the rest is from the hardware store.  Here was my trial run with this setup(and me being an idiot). It isn't perfect, but I was doing it all myself and didn't mess with it much. The video was shot with a Panasonic HD-900K and the audio is a Rode VideoMic. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r35Zk4-bjjw

I have a larger and more costly setup at the office, but like anything, you can spend as much as you want to. I spend half my day doing elearning/instructional design and I spend rest of my time doing video/media production. 

Don't underestimate the importance of good quality audio. The quality of the audio is more important than the quality of the video. People will tolerate poor quality video if the audio is good, but not vice versa. I would sacrifice the quality of the camera if it meant I could get better audio gear. 

Some questions. 

What is your shooting environment going to be most of the time?

Do you need to portable?

How many presenters will you normally have at one time?

Does your budget need to include software or is that budget just for hardware?

eric mongrain

Sorry the camera is actually the newer version the Zi10.  I actually just completed a 40minute long DVD that i used about 40 video clips from the kodak zi10 camera.  The audio i end up doing separately in Audacity and the mic i use is the Samson C01U usb condenser mic.  for photos i use a nice Fugi DSLR and i have the lighting like Rich

Ellyn Lambert
Steve Flowers

AVCHD is an oddball format that will initially feel like a pain. Would recommend looking for a converter that works well with your camera or film in MP4 mode if your camera supports it. My Sony NEX-5n supports AVCHD and MP4 formats. The MP4 is restricted to certain camera modes (not sure why) but it saves me a conversion step.

It took me quite a few tests to find a converter that worked well with my camera's AVCHD format. 

Steve Flowers

Your video editing suite may work fine with AVCDH - unfortunately, many high end cameras don't output MP4 as AVCHD carries high quality signal more efficiently (and more of it). The only way to tell how well something will work is by trying it out or asking folks that use the camera how they shape their workflow. 

This AVCHD converter indicates that it's made for the Sony camera you listed above. Depending on your purposes, you might be better off looking at a DSLR body. These will typically be more suitable for shorter clips (20 minutes) but you'd get the benefit of a dynamite still camera and lens flexibility. I love my compact Sony NEX-5n ($600) but I think there are better cameras out there for video purposes from Canon and Panasonic:

http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Digital-28-135mm-3-5-5-6-Standard/dp/B002NEGTU6/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1334766111&sr=8-2