Using Video in Quizzes and Scenarios #365

Interactive Video in E-Learning #365: Challenge | Recap

Interactive videos are a great way to capture learners’ attention, render information visually, and give them a break from text-heavy content. Using video-based quizzes and scenarios, you can transform the typical e-learning quiz or scenario into something more engaging for learners.  And using video to create more engaging e-learning is what this week’s challenge is all about!

To help get you started, check out the following examples from our 2019 video quiz challenge.

Quiz with Video Backgrounds

A common approach to video quizzes is to overlay the question choices above the video. Here’s a good example of using a full-slide video to focus on a specific step or process in a quiz.

Quiz with Video Backgrounds

View project | Natalie Budesa | Website

Quiz with Supporting Video

Video quizzes don’t need to be full-screen, immersive productions. Instead, keep things simple by using video to support the quiz. This example from Jodi shows how subtle videos can replace static images to create more engaging quizzes.

Quiz with Supporting Video

View project | Download | Jodi Sansone | @jodimsansone

Video Interview with Branching Quiz Questions

This is one of my favorite examples from the video interview challenge. I really like how this project alternates between presentation and quizzing modes.

Video Interview with Branching Quiz Questions

View the interactive video quiz by Amar Kulshreshtha

Challenge of the Week

This week, your challenge is to share an example that shows how videos can be used in quizzes or scenarios.

Your entry can be anything from a rough concept to a polished example. The challenges are open to everyone, regardless of experience or skill level. 

Share Your E-Learning Work

  • Comments: Use the comments section below to share a link to your published example and blog post.
  • Forums: Start  your own thread and share a link to your published example..
  • Personal blog:  If you have a blog, please consider writing about your challenges. We’ll link back to your posts so the great work you’re sharing gets even more exposure.
  • Social Media: If you share your demos on Twitter or LinkedIn, try using #ELHChallenge or #ElearningChallenge so your tweeps can track your e-learning coolness.

New to the E-Learning Challenges?

The weekly e-learning challenges are ongoing opportunities to learn, share, and build your e-learning portfolios. You can jump into any or all of the previous challenges anytime you want. I’ll update the recap posts to include your demos.

Learn more about the challenges in this Q&A post and why and how to participate in this helpful article.

Last Week’s Challenge:

Before you dive into this week's challenge, take some time to hear from your fellow designers in last week's audio podcast challenge:

E-Learning Podcasts: Audio Interviews with Course Designers #364

Audio Interviews with E-Learning Designers #364: Challenge | Recap

133 Comments
David Anderson
David Anderson
Danny Benton

Hi, I have created another entry for this challenge, I selected a random 17 slide template presentation in Canva, set the timer of each slide to 5 seconds and exported as one MP4 file. My intention is here was to play out the unique slide transitions you get on Canva within Storyline. I have used many 'pause timeline' triggers connected to forward and back buttons which have strategically been aligned with cue points. Demo; https://360.articulate.com/review/content/f8469c81-555d-44c9-9c27-176784147ff5/review Download; https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lin_vJAPMfOu1jt260VrWWHA1-qu7Jph/view?usp=sharing It's the first time I have tried something like this (I have tried separate video files on different slides and layers before, but wanted to see if I could save time using o... Expand

Paul Alders