Quiz reaction categories

Hi, I don't manage to configure a quiz in a way, that a result may be half correct. If the user thought of a certain condition, his answer is right. If not, he should be made aware that he just had a lucky guess. But I can't say he was wrong, because the circumstances for his answers are really complex. So instead of right or wrong, I want to let the quiz react with good inspirations.

My quiz does not serve to certify absolute knowledge. It shall make people sensitive for thinking in the right manner ans putting the right questions before they exclude items from belonging to a certain category.

The reactions of the quiz template like "correct", "incorrect" and "try again" don't give me the opportunity to copy the "correct" item and make a "correct if..." out of it.

5 Replies
Lauren Connelly

Hi Anselm!

You're right, this isn't a feature in Storyline. We currently offer feedback for correct, incorrect, and try again.

If you are looking to offer this type of feedback, what about trying Survey questions? Your students would have the opportunity to explain their answers, and it would be up to you to provide additional scoring points.

I'm interested in any other workarounds to create a scenario like this in Storyline 360!

Anselm Geske

Hi,

Thanks for the suggestion to use open questions, but it actually ends in more efforts for me, because I would need to care for all answers very individually. This is not the target.

I want to give advice for each single drag&drop action a little more than only "Try again", "Correct" or "Incorrect", because I want to inspire people to think in the right manner. Instead of giving confusing specifications for the drag objects ending in a harsh feedback, people shall just try something and get advice while "failing". There is no absolute right or wrong in my setup. It depends if people related the object for the right reason. So I let them do as they think and offer additional text to deepen their thought on their decision. They may stay with their opinion. So the drop action does not need to be withdrawn, because it's nothing but wrong. This would be didactically stupid.

The WBT is a machine and definitely never as smart as the learners. So it may not say "you are too stupid to handle me, try again". I need better motivation for my learners to explore and receive support while proceeding. It's the "Yes, and..."-approach. I expect an intelligent WBT to handle this adequately.

Best regards
Anselm Geske

BSH Hausgeräte GmbH
Global Information Technology
PLM Governance, Training (GIT-PLG)

Wohlrabedamm 15
13629 Berlin
Tel.: +49 30814022633
Mobil: +49 173 8861900
Fax: +49 3081402-5137
anselm.geske@bshg.com
www.bsh-group.com

Anselm Geske

Thanks! That's a good hint. I'll play around with that.

Best regards
Anselm Geske

BSH Hausgeräte GmbH
Global Information Technology
PLM Governance, Training (GIT-PLG)

Wohlrabedamm 15
13629 Berlin
Tel.: +49 30814022633
Mobil: +49 173 8861900
Fax: +49 3081402-5137
anselm.geske@bshg.com
www.bsh-group.com