self-promotion

Hi

I  was wondering what everyone does to promote  themselves. Do you always include a page or a tab at the end of the course including the person responsible for the content and yourself as a "produced by". Perhaps also including the person who did the voice-over. Are there any do's and don'ts here? What would you include?

Can anyone help here?

Thanks,

Kim

16 Replies
Bruce Graham

Hi,

"My" courses become the IP and property of my clients when they get paid for, and as such I think it's rather "naff" to use them as promotion in that way.

My promotion usually comes from other people in a company seeing what someone else has done, and asking for my details, or from repeat business, or recommendation.

I can understand that would be different if you sold your courses through e.g. OpenSesame where you retained the IP.

Bruce

Kim Alison

Hi,

Yes I can see your point of view. I work within a huge global company and only make the courses for the company I work for. But as it's so large and our organisation is new, I've had a couple of calls from people saying they needed so long to find me or they give the work externally because they just don't know that I exist.

And the guy giving the content would like to see his name on it. So both these things are making me try and find a "not-naff" way to include it.

Kim

Mike Walters

Hi Kim,

I really like what eLearner Engaged did in there demo in the Articulate community showcase > http://articulate.demos.s3.amazonaws.com/dc_fundamentals/story.html

This makes me feel that if well done it is acceptable to have a "Credits" slide at the end of a module.

The only niggle that I have at the back of my mind is if you are creating a module for a client and the intended audience are a group of employees for example; is it really worth having a credits section? Are the learners actually going to be interested and will it generate any leads for you?

In this sort of instance I won't actually put anything in the module itself but I will ensure my author details and email are in the description section when I publish the course.

Of course, if you are a creating a demo module or something that is for resale (somewhere like Open Sesame for example) then definitely make sure there is a cool credits screen in there.

Cheers,

Mike

Bruce Graham

Agree with Mike.

I think it's much better/professional (?) to have your "adverts" in your distribution and marketing mechanisms rather than in the content.

When this guy leaves and his name is plastered all over courses - then what?

I do wonder hat his motivations are for wanting so much exposure and credit.........

Bruce

Scott Hewitt

Hi.

I think this depends on the client and the final market.

If you are creating the course/product for a client then I suggest that you ask the client before you put any type of credits into it. I'd also get them to agree what it is included in it. A lot of clients have e-learning standards which cover things like this. If it is a custom project for a client and the course will be used only in their business I wouldn't expect to include a credits section.

If you are creating your own courses to sell you can do what you want! I've worked for companies involved in e-learning and computer game design and writing the credits list for the manuals and the game has taken weeks...who do you include, why have certain people been missed, how do you write their names? It is a another thing to check! ...not including the animated logos that started to appear.

It sounds like people don't know about the capabilities of you within your organisation. Instead of a credits page could you create a demo course that you could distribute to the business or host on the LMS/Intranet? It would show the capabilities of you and your team - it will be uploaded and you can email people to show that you have this demo available. Also you could include a lot more information about you and your skills - just a thought? ....assuming that you have the time to build the demo! :)

Hope this helps,

Scott

Sheila Bulthuis

Kim,

I agree with Bruce - including individual names isn't usually a good idea, as people do leave...  However, it sounds as if your primary concern is people in your own company knowing that your group/organization is the one within the company that's creating these courses? 

If that's the case, I think you could consider some or all of these options:

  • Brand your group - in each of my corporate jobs, our department had a name and, in most cases, a logo.  If you include these in everything you produce, and in all your communications, people will have an easier time finding you.
  • Include your group's name and/or logo in the player (as in the sample Mike linked to).
  • Have a slide at the end that says something like "If you have any feedback about this course, please send it to...[email address]."  (Ideally, this is a group mailbox, not an individual's mailbox)
  • If you don't already, implement Level 1 surveys at the end of each course; this gives you an opportunity to collect feedback about your courses and you can also include your group's contact info there (again, preferably a shared mailbox - e.g., training @company.com).
  • If your courses are in the company's LMS, make sure your info is in there somewhere - depending on the LMS, there may be a field for it, or you could include it in the course description.

Hope some of those ideas help - good luck!

Nancy Woinoski

Kim Alison said:

Hi,

Yes I can see your point of view. I work within a huge global company and only make the courses for the company I work for. But as it's so large and our organisation is new, I've had a couple of calls from people saying they needed so long to find me or they give the work externally because they just don't know that I exist.

And the guy giving the content would like to see his name on it. So both these things are making me try and find a "not-naff" way to include it.

Kim


Hey Kim, if you are creating courses for internal use in your company, there is nothing wrong with creating a credits slide at the end of the course to give credit to everyone who worked on the project - just make sure you include your subject experts as well as your designers. People like to be recognized for their efforts.

You could include your department's contact info here as well or put it in a separate tab.

Daniel Brigham

The heroes are making very good points, as usual.

A slightly different way for self-promotion: determine the impact of the training you create--maybe it's reduced training costs, reduced turnover, greater sales, whatever. Then align yourself with that impact. Perhaps present on that impact within the company. How you designed the course to achieve maximum impact, etc. etc.

When people think of the positive impact the training has made, perhaps they think of you. Not too hard to do, if your company values and celebrates training. Anyway, just a different way to go about self-promotion.

Bruce Graham

Nancy Woinoski said:

Kim Alison said:

Hi,

Yes I can see your point of view. I work within a huge global company and only make the courses for the company I work for. But as it's so large and our organisation is new, I've had a couple of calls from people saying they needed so long to find me or they give the work externally because they just don't know that I exist.

And the guy giving the content would like to see his name on it. So both these things are making me try and find a "not-naff" way to include it.

Kim


Hey Kim, if you are creating courses for internal use in your company, there is nothing wrong with creating a credits slide at the end of the course to give credit to everyone who worked on the project - just make sure you include your subject experts as well as your designers. People like to be recognized for their efforts.

You could include your department's contact info here as well or put it in a separate tab.

I would agree that people like to be recognised, I am just not sure that doing it in a course is the best way to do it. Certainly I have never seen, or been allowed to do this when I was in "corporate-land".

I think there are probably better ways to advertise yourself, your department and your offering, perhaps more subtle that "WE MADE THIS!" at the end of the course, (when I suspect people will rush off anyhow to do emails   )

People will know me as a shy and retiring individual ;)  but I just think there are more appropriate, effective and powerful ways to achieve fame, glory and un-ending Purchase Orders in your corner of Corporate-land.

Just my 2p worth.

Bruce

Ken Stafford

I work for a large organisation and the courses are only used by my organisation. 

I use credits only so other department heads know where they can go for support, If they want to create e-Learning for their department.

My credits section is an advert for my department (training department) which also offers basic computer courses and help with e-Learning for those members of staff who are not very good with computers.

So really the only reason we promote ourselves is so staff know where to get help!

Kim Alison

Thank you so much for all your points and help. Certainly gives me a lot to think about. I think I'll need to find a nice way to explain to my SME that he needn't be mentioned. I definitely mustn't show him Bruce's subtle approach - I think he'd love it!

Thank you for some really great and useful ideas like the feedback email and many more things mentioned here.

Kim