10 Replies
James Brown

Let's look at what your product is? What do you want the nurses to learn from it. I see a lot about the exam and a little about the possible equipment. You really need to think about how you wish to cover the materials. Is this going to simply be covered by e-learning or are you going to supplement the training. If you are simply trying to explain the use of a new blood pressure machine than scrap all of the non-necessary information and target in on your objective, i.e. a nurse will be able to take a patient's blood pressure with this new device. Hopefully you see where we are going with this.

You really need to start off with a good task analysis because from what I see above you have a lot of non-necessary information.  I remember watching a tv show where a person hired a SME. The person simply wanted to know from the SME how to do a specific task yet the SME tended to digress into information that was not necessary for the task at hand. The result was the person being cheezed off by the SME and he was very happy to see them go. That's why it's nice to have a SME but it's really up to toss all of the non essential information and keep all of the pertinent information. From what I see above you have definitely have some info to toss and you also need to focus in on the materials that are pertinent to the operation of the product.

James Brown

BTW an objective is not Physical exam or diagnostic workups. That would be more a definition of a process. Based on the amount of materials you are going to have a bunch of training subsections with different goals and objectives for each section. An objective is more in tune of, after the training module the nurse will be able to explain the term constipation correctly to a physician. Hopefully that makes sense. 

Poornima Ramachandran

Hi Venice,

That's an interesting query you have posted. An engage tool like a label graphic would serve the purpose, if you are on a stiff deadline.

But the course might feel like sleeping pills to your nurses.

I was in a similar soup last month, where I had to thrust down a truck load of info on my learners. I came up with something, which I have attached for your reference (based on the glassy blue template). Lessons I learnt -

1. Don't show all the info at a stretch - It might scare your learners.

2. Adding a human touch, like a pointing hand would keep the course lively. (A point demonstrated by Tom in one of his blogs dealing with presenting tables).

3. Break it into as simple learning pieces as possible.

I tried to work around the sample you provided, and below is a suggested way. I have also included the PPT version of this. Hope it helps, and good luck!

Louise Ward

I would try and break it up into a 'walk through' scenario - e.g. you (as in the learner; who is the nurse) have a patient and you need to carry out each examination....maybe you could be on your rounds and a doctor is asking you questions as you go through (e.g. where is the low pressure retention cuff located?)

So it's like a quiz based scenario....