Going it alone instead of working for an organisation - advice on examples

Hi there,

After being made redundant for 2 years, from my last job as e-Learning developer, well my title was multimedia designer (but was really developing and updating current learning material).

I am doing a website offering my services as an ELD, and on that website, I will need to have some examples of work I do. I am unable to use what was done when I was employed, for obvious reasons.

So I want some advice on what best to do for examples. I personally love simulations, but often times they are not what people are looking for. Any ideas please would be great....thanks in advance.

Kind regards

Rossco

10 Replies
Richard Watson

Ross,

When it comes to "what is best to do for examples", it looks like Matthew has given you an excellent resource for ideas. I would like to add one more suggestion. When you select what you want to include in your portfolio, think a little about what types/styles you enjoy creating. What you put in your portfolio will tend to attract potential clients who want that specific thing. In other words, if the bulk of your portfolio includes technical-related subject matter, your clientele will be more skewed to that asking you to create that for them. Make sense? 

Richard

David Tait

If you're looking to get work from organisations in a specific industry, try developing examples using content that relates to your target industry.

This sometimes helps potential clients visualise how you could make their content look and feel and shows them that you understand their industry.

Holly MacDonald

Ross - it might be a good idea to determine your target market and determine your unique value proposition for that target market. Be prepared to sell to that target. 

I like the Value Proposition Canvas as a tool to work through aspects of defining that: https://strategyzer.com/canvas/value-proposition-canvas

It gets you out of the "do any project for money" (where you eventually are competing on price) to "do the right projects for the right clients at the right price" place.

My 2 bits...

Richard Watson

Holly,

More great advice. It's so easy to become busy with the wrong clients and "chasing money" and then wonder why you're all of a sudden burnt out!

I've found that many e-Learning freelancers have a hard time saying "No" when money is on the table. Even when the client and/or project is not a good fit. It starts with thinking about your core values and long-term goals. Many times, I've turned down potential clients because they were not a good fit for me. That's not to say they would not be a good fit for another e-Learning freelancer. :)

Richard

Ross Hopkins
Holly MacDonald

Ross - it might be a good idea to determine your target market and determine your unique value proposition for that target market. Be prepared to sell to that target. 

I like the Value Proposition Canvas as a tool to work through aspects of defining that: https://strategyzer.com/canvas/value-proposition-canvas

It gets you out of the "do any project for money" (where you eventually are competing on price) to "do the right projects for the right clients at the right price" place.

My 2 bits...

Brilliant Holly,

thanks very much for the link and info

Ross Hopkins
Richard Watson

Holly,

More great advice. It's so easy to become busy with the wrong clients and "chasing money" and then wonder why you're all of a sudden burnt out!

I've found that many e-Learning freelancers have a hard time saying "No" when money is on the table. Even when the client and/or project is not a good fit. It starts with thinking about your core values and long-term goals. Many times, I've turned down potential clients because they were not a good fit for me. That's not to say they would not be a good fit for another e-Learning freelancer. :)

Richard

Thanks for the heads up Richard

Kind regards

Rossco