Version Controls in Rise 360

Hi Community,

Just curious, how do you version control in Rise 360?  I don't see anywhere that it does this in the course or settings for that particular course.  So it seems that I would have to duplicate a course and version control via title bar (old school and makes so lots of files - so 90's).

Here is my rationale most governments and legal require to see specific versions of courses. EG: transportation you build an air brakes course version 1 in 2000. It doesn't have pneumatic pressures in it. It is revised in 2005. Accident happens in 2002. Legal needs to see operators and what specific course they took.

Thoughts.

3 Replies
Patricia Raymond

Along those lines - How are people doing their own version control?  and in particular for places where we have two courses that have some of the same content but have different audiences (for example one version has instructor notes).  Is anyone doing anything that feels scalable for managing content blocks so that if something changes, you can minimize the number of places you make the change?  (author once/publish multiple)

Karl Muller

When we create a new Rise course, we use a signed-off course design document in MS Word format.

The document contains the entire course, structure, content, quiz questions, descriptions of interactions and media, etc. This is the course blueprint and we develop the Rise course exactly as specified in the document.

Over the life of the Rise course, we always keep the Word document updated. If anything needs to change in the Rise course, we first update the Word document, and then update the Rise course to match.

So we use Word documents for our version control. 

In terms of "author once/publish multiple times", this is not something Rise is not good at.

We also have several courses that have some of the course content, and even if you use Template blocks, making a change in one course does not automatically update the same content in the other courses. At least using templates, you can ensure that the change is made consistently even though editing is a manual and repetitive process.